allopolo:volvo ocean race Found it on the Volvo site with…

Thursday, November 30th, 2017

allopolo:

volvo ocean race

Found it on the Volvo site with Google’s reverse image search:

October 17, 2014. Leg 1 onboard Team Vestas Wind. Maciel Cicchetti driving, Tony Rae on mainsheet and Nicolai Sehestead on trim as the boat surfs at 25 knts on the morning of Day

…and then it cuts off, in mid-sentence. 😜

I thought that looked like Nicolai (on AkzoNobel this time). And I wondered about that smooth-ish dome on Maciel (on Brunel this time).

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a-solitary-sea-rover: a-solitary-sea-rover: Computer-Background-W…

Tuesday, November 28th, 2017

a-solitary-sea-rover:

a-solitary-sea-rover:

Computer-Background-Worthy photos of the Volvo Ocean Race fleet arriving in Cape Town this past weekend. (x)

For those who missed it. 

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Volvo Ocean Race: Out go the lights

Monday, November 20th, 2017

Volvo Ocean Race: Out go the lights:

a-solitary-sea-rover:

(November 20, 2017; Leg 2, Day 16) – The dance for the Volvo Ocean Race teams around the St Helena High appeared complete, with all seven bows aiming east toward the finish line. Nearly as far south as the Roaring Forties, it was breeze on and heat off with a 1700 nm drag race to home.

And then it got interesting.

Dutch crew Team Brunel opted to go into stealth mode today, cloaking their position from their rivals for up to 24 hours. Trailing only leader MAPFRE by some 35 nm, Brunel made the call to ‘disappear’ from the rankings following the 0700 UTC report.

Will Brunel, the most southerly boat in the fleet, go further south?

Did you see how there’s a bug in the web version of the official tracker such that if you use the slider to back up ever so slightly from the current position you can actually see what appears to be Brunel’s real, unmasked position? I commented on SA via this gif, which felt on-brand if slightly weird.

“Right. So, not quite as secret as we’d hoped.”

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All shook up

Friday, November 17th, 2017

All shook up:

a-solitary-sea-rover:

Dongfeng Race Team Onboard Reporter Jérémie Lecaudey describes how his crewmates differ in their behavior when taking the helm:

It took me a while to understand that Pascal was driving, his body against the stack of sails, one of these stylish positions that some drivers end up having. Stu puts one of his hand upside down, Charles drives like a cowboy on a big truck, Daryl… looks like he’s driving his own car really… he’ll talk to you in 30 + knots and still follow your conversation as if nothing was happening when you’re s*** scared, every wave stopping the boat from gliding perfectly on the ocean unlike tonight, the boat smoothly follows the waves and gain speed up to 20 knots in the gusts.

Daryl’s average when I look at the polar percentage is always around 105, surely one of the best but what the hell, Jeremie, Carolijn, Jackson, they are all the best at it anyway…

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Turn the Tide on Plastic gybes to starboard. Volvo Ocean Race,…

Tuesday, November 7th, 2017

Turn the Tide on Plastic gybes to starboard. Volvo Ocean Race, 2017-11-07 1740 UTC. Source.

I want to talk for a second about that guy in red at the back of the boat. That’s Sam Greenfield, the boat’s on-board reporter (OBR). This time around, for the first time, the output of the Volvo OBRs is being published immediately, without filtering by the team sponsor or the race organization. The OBRs shoot the video, edit it on board, uploads it via satellite, and it’s immediately available for viewing on the race’s Raw Content page.

I’m kind of obsessed.

When I saw this video show up in the feed today I immediately got excited. Because in the beginning of the video you can see that the crew is shifting the stack to leeward, which means they’re about to gybe. And as far as I know no one had ever used a drone to record a racing sailboat gybing in conditions like this in the middle of the ocean.

Well, someone has now. :-)

Sam pioneered the use of drones in the last edition of the race, and since then they’ve become common in coverage of sailboat racing. But he keeps pushing the state of the art forward.

The start of Leg 2 has been windy and rough, and a lot of the OBRs (and not only the OBRs) have been dealing with seasickness. Despite being one of the victims, Sam has been sharing amazing stories off the boat over the last two days. I can’t wait to follow him around the world over the next 8 months.

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kaiyves replied to your photo “a-solitary-sea-rover: A report from Turn the Tide on…

Monday, November 6th, 2017

kaiyves
replied to your photo
“a-solitary-sea-rover:
A report from Turn the Tide on Plastic’s…”

It’s a lost cause because Moms ALWAYS worry.

IKR? I would spend nine months with continual anxiety if a kid of mine did this race.

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a-solitary-sea-rover: A report from Turn the Tide on Plastic’s…

Monday, November 6th, 2017

a-solitary-sea-rover:

A report from Turn the Tide on Plastic’s Onboard Reporter, Sam Greenfield. If he’s covering the VOR, he’d better add that word to his spellcheck.

(Here’s the video of the lifevest incident.)

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a-solitary-sea-rover: lies: Alan Block (Mr. Clean on Sailing…

Monday, November 6th, 2017

a-solitary-sea-rover:

lies:

Alan Block (Mr. Clean on Sailing Anarchy) and Matt Knighton (the OBR for Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing, the team that won the previous edition of the Volvo Ocean Race) have a new video podcast all about the media coming off the boats in this edition. I am, as you probably will be unsurprised to learn, very excited about it.

I’ve created a spreadsheet to keep track of the metadata for all the Raw Content videos being uploaded off the boats. See here:

http://ift.tt/2AaRAME

Alan made a nice comment on SA about how helpful the spreadsheet was for his preparation for this episode.

Leg 2 of the race started this morning. This is the first full-on ocean-crossing leg: 7,000 miles, finishing in Cape Town about 3 weeks from now. Great footage from the live show, including helicopter shots of them blasting out into the North Atlantic with 30+ knots of wind. Dongfeng was first out of Lisbon, with MAPFRE right behind them.

Holy crumbs, that is a detailed spreadsheet, hats off to you, @lies

And this is a great vidcast, especially the bit about NASA being interested in the VOR as an analogue for travel to Mars.  

[17 hours into Leg 2, MAPFRE are currently leading. Tracker here.]

 😜

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Hang OnTurn the Tide on Plastic, Volvo Ocean Race, 2017-11-05….

Monday, November 6th, 2017

Hang On

Turn the Tide on Plastic, Volvo Ocean Race, 2017-11-05. Source

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Alan Block (Mr. Clean on Sailing Anarchy) and Matt Knighton (the…

Sunday, November 5th, 2017

Alan Block (Mr. Clean on Sailing Anarchy) and Matt Knighton (the OBR for Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing, the team that won the previous edition of the Volvo Ocean Race) have a new video podcast all about the media coming off the boats in this edition. I am, as you probably will be unsurprised to learn, very excited about it.

I’ve created a spreadsheet to keep track of the metadata for all the Raw Content videos being uploaded off the boats. See here:

http://ift.tt/2AaRAME

Alan made a nice comment on SA about how helpful the spreadsheet was for his preparation for this episode.

Leg 2 of the race started this morning. This is the first full-on ocean-crossing leg: 7,000 miles, finishing in Cape Town about 3 weeks from now. Great footage from the live show, including helicopter shots of them blasting out into the North Atlantic with 30+ knots of wind. Dongfeng was first out of Lisbon, with MAPFRE right behind them.

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Volvo Ocean Race on Twitter

Friday, November 3rd, 2017

Volvo Ocean Race on Twitter:

Liz Wardley on Turn the Tide on Plastic had a nasty accident during the Lisbon In Port race today. (Earlier in the race Ñeti on MAPFRE had a similar accident when a sheet pulled his legs out from under him and he landed on the back of his head.)

The foredeck of a racing sailboat definitely isn’t the safest place. I’m glad Liz wasn’t hurt worse. Also, good job by OBR Sam Greenfield, who switched quickly from his designated “watch but don’t assist” role to dropping the camera and helping to free her. (Another member of the crew ran forward from the pit area to help too, but I can’t tell who it was from the video.)

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2017-10-23: The Volvo fleet exits GibralterThey didn’t post it…

Tuesday, October 31st, 2017

2017-10-23: The Volvo fleet exits Gibralter

They didn’t post it on YouTube until now, but the Volvo Ocean Race media team did an amazing job of broadcasting live on That Other Platform (mumble mumble Facebook mumble) when the Volvo racers were running through the Strait of Gibralter on the second afternoon of Leg 1. The winds were being funneled into the Strait, and the boats had only a narrow channel they were allowed to sail in due to commercial shipping, so there was a lot of gybing in pretty intense conditions.

The most-compelling footage for me was watching eventual leg-winner Vestas at the front of the fleet, hanging onto their Masthead 0 rather than shortening sail, keeping everything just barely on the right side of catastrophe. The media people were able to combine live helicopter footage with on-board video and audio, and hearing the sailors talking through the maneuvers was some of the best competitive-sailing television I’ve ever seen. I mean, these teams do this a lot; they’ll be doing it all the way around the world over the next nine months, at times in gnarlier conditions and circumstances than they were dealing with here. But this felt like being there on that boat as it happened.

I’ve tried to link to the part where they join Vestas, around 36:30, but it’s all great.

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Así es la Volvo Ocean Race desde dentro

Tuesday, October 31st, 2017

a-solitary-sea-rover:

yahoodeportes-es-yahoopartner:

El pasado domingo 22 de octubre arrancó en Alicante una nueva edición de la Volvo Ocean Race, que finalizará a finales de junio de 2018 en La Haya. Las siete embarcaciones participantes han completado ya la primera de las 10 etapas de las que se compone la prueba, que tenía como meta Lisboa. En total, han sido más de 1.600 millas náuticas de recorrido que nos han dejado unas imágenes espectaculares de las tripulaciones luchando contra los rivales y los elementos.

RelacionadoLas espectaculares imágenes de la Barcolana, la regata más multitudinaria del mundo

Volvo Ocean Race

El pasado fin de semana finalizó la primera de las 10 etapas de la Volvo Ocean Race 2017-2018. Se trataba de un sprint de 1.650 millas entre Alicante y Lisboa que los participantes han completado en apenas seis días de navegación. Nada comparado con lo que tienen aún por delante. (Foto: Instagram / @volvooceanrace).

Source: Yahoo Deportes

Sin embargo, pese a haber sido una etapa corta, no ha estado exenta de dificultades y los tripulantes se han tenido que enfrentar a los rivales y a los elementos, como demuestran estas espectaculares imágenes desde el interior de las embarcaciones. (Foto: Instagram / @volvooceanrace).

Source: Yahoo Deportes

Y es que la vida de los regatistas a bordo de sus embarcaciones no es nada sencilla. Tienen que comer, dormir, navegar y hacer guardias. (Foto: Instagram / @volvooceanrace).

Source: Yahoo Deportes

Incluso realizar cualquier tarea de higiene se vuelve muy complicada mientras navegas luchando con el mar y el viento. (Foto: Instagram / @volvooceanrace).

Source: Yahoo Deportes

Sin embargo, para estos regatistas participar en la vuelta al mundo a vela supone toda una oportunidad y un reto personal. (Foto: Instagram / @volvooceanrace).

Source: Yahoo Deportes

La Volvo Ocean Race arrancó, como decíamos, en Alicante el pasado 22 de octubre y finalizará el 30 de junio de 2018 en La Haya, Países Bajos. (Foto: Instagram / @volvooceanrace).

Source: Yahoo Deportes

En total serán 10 etapas, algunas de más de 7.000 millas náuticas, en las que las embarcaciones darán la vuelta al mundo. (Foto: Instagram / @volvooceanrace).

Source: Yahoo Deportes

En la segunda de las etapas, las embarcaciones partirán de Lisboa el 5 de noviembre para llegar a principios de diciembre a Ciudad del Cabo. (Foto: Instagram / @volvooceanrace).

Source: Yahoo Deportes

Después tendrán que navegar por el Océano Índico hasta Australia, China y Nueva Zelanda, cruzar el Pacífico y el Cabo de Hornos para alcanzar Brasil y llegar a Estados Unidos a través del Atlántico, antes de regresar nuevamente a Europa. (Foto: Instagram / @volvooceanrace).

Source: Yahoo Deportes

Al igual que en la edición 2014-15, en esta participan siete embarcaciones. Entre ellas está el Azzam, actual campeón, que este año compite bajo el nombre Team Sun Hung Kai/Scallywag y el australiano David Witt ha sustituido al británico Ian Walker como patrón. (Foto: Instagram / @volvooceanrace).

Source: Yahoo Deportes

El único barco español participante es el Mapfre, cuyo patrón es el doble medallista olímpico Xabi Fernández. (Foto: Instagram / @volvooceanrace).

Source: Yahoo Deportes

El Vestas 11th Hour Racing, liderado por el estadounidense Charlie Enright, fue el ganador de la primera etapa por delante del Mapfre. (Foto: Instagram / @volvooceanrace).

Source: Yahoo Deportes

La Volvo Ocean Race 2017-2018 es la edición número 13 de esta regata que se celebró por primera vez en 1973 organizada por la Royal Naval Sailing Association. (Foto: Instagram / @volvooceanrace).

Source: Yahoo Deportes

En un principio constaba de tan solo cuatro etapas y se celebraba cada cuatro años. Ahora es cada 3 y tiene 10 etapas. (Foto: Instagram / @volvooceanrace).

Source: Yahoo Deportes

Como decíamos, la edición 2017-2018 no ha hecho nada más que comenzar y por delante quedan unas 80.000 millas de navegación, casi 130.000 kilómetros. (Foto: Instagram / @volvooceanrace).

Source: Yahoo Deportes

Así que veremos imágenes aún más impresionantes que estas de las regatistas durante los próximos meses. (Foto: Instagram / @volvooceanrace).

Source: Yahoo Deportes

On Sunday, October 22, a new edition of the Volvo Ocean Race started in Alicante, which will end at the end of June 2018 in The Hague. The seven participating boats have already completed the first of the 10 stages of the test, which was aimed at Lisbon. In total, there have been more than 1,600 nautical miles of travel that have left us spectacular images of the crews fighting against their rivals and the elements.

(With context and Elementary School Spanish the rest is pretty easy to follow.)

That last picture of Team Brunel would make a good movie poster.

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Volvo Ocean Race: Vestas wins Leg 1 >> Scuttlebutt Sailing News

Saturday, October 28th, 2017

Volvo Ocean Race: Vestas wins Leg 1 >> Scuttlebutt Sailing News:

a-solitary-sea-rover:

Vestas 11th Hour Racing have won Leg 1 of the Volvo Ocean Race, crossing the finish line in the River Tagus in Lisbon, Portugal this afternoon afternoon.

It’s a tremendous victory for American skipper Charlie Enright and his team, who earn 8 points for their efforts (including a one point ‘bonus’ for winning the leg).

It wasn’t easy. The wind shut down on the final approach, and an early morning lead of 34-nautical miles over second-placed MAPFRE was whittled down to 10-miles, with the finish in sight, but the current in the river even pushing the leaders back out to sea in some of the lulls.

But the crew on the Vestas boat held their nerve, tacking first up and then down, zigzagging towards the line, into agonisingly light headwinds.

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anonsally replied to your photoset “Vestas exits the Med As of October 24, 2017, Vestas 11th Hour…

Tuesday, October 24th, 2017

anonsally replied to your photoset “Vestas exits the Med As of October 24, 2017, Vestas 11th Hour Racing…”

ooh! has it started?

It has! They started Sunday in Alicante, Spain, exited from the Mediterranean Monday afternoon/evening, and are now en route to the turning mark just northeast of the island of Madeira, about 700 miles southwest of the Straits of Gibraltar. If all continues according to the plan they’ll finish Leg 1 in Lisbon, Portugal next weekend.

It has been quite exciting so far, and the coverage has been really good. They are posting video from the boats on the official site’s Raw content page, which is something I’ve been particularly whiny about wanting them to do in the past, so good on them.

Pre-race favorites MAPFRE have clawed their way from toward the back up into second place. But the surprise leaders so far have been Vestas 11th Hour, the team led by Charlie Enright and Mark Towill, the two young(ish) Americans who led the Alvimedica team last time. Their main sponsor is Vestas Wind, who sponsored a different group of sailors in the last race. They (Charlie and Mark) have picked up some top sailors for their crew, including Simon Fisher, who was navigator on Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing (the overall winner) last time.

Wind has been easterly, meaning they had a quick run out through the Strait of Gibraltar. The wind funneled through there enough to give them gusts of 30 knots yesterday afternoon, which is when those helicopter shots of Vestas were taken. Besides some really good navigation from SiFi, they’ve been sailing aggressively, using a larger sail (the Masthead Code 0) when Akzonobel behind them changed down to a more-conservative Fractional Code 0 to get through the Strait.

Now (Tuesday night) the wind has pretty much died. MAPFRE has positioned themselves well to the north of the rest of the fleet; it will be interesting to see if they can get the new wind first.

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Vestas exits the MedAs of October 24, 2017, Vestas 11th Hour…

Tuesday, October 24th, 2017

Vestas exits the Med

As of October 24, 2017, Vestas 11th Hour Racing leads the 7-boat fleet on Leg 1 of the Volvo Ocean Race. [Source]

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Countdown to Volvo Ocean Race >> Scuttlebutt Sailing News

Tuesday, October 17th, 2017

Countdown to Volvo Ocean Race >> Scuttlebutt Sailing News:

a-solitary-sea-rover:

On October 22 at 1200 UTC, the longest endurance race in the world begins, the Volvo Ocean Race. Libby Greenhalgh, who was navigator for Team SCA in the 2014-15 edition, shares insight as the seven teams prepare for this eight month challenge.

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Race officials finally posted the full replay of the Alicante…

Monday, October 16th, 2017

Race officials finally posted the full replay of the Alicante in-port race on YouTube, though apparently they kept it hidden for a while, which confuses me, but whatever. Commentary after a cut to preserve the dashboards of the non-obsessed.

Boats designed to surf monster waves in the Southern Ocean aren’t the easiest things to get around a short windward-leeward course in 8 knots of wind. But for me this race was surprisingly exciting to watch for one reason: The whole thing was basically over before the starting gun went off.

I’ve linked to that point in the video (around 8:31). Analysis with screenshots follows.

Here’s a helicopter shot with 1:26 to go:

image

The wind is blowing from the right. That powerboat sitting by itself toward the lower right is the race committee boat that marks the right end of the starting line; the tiny yellow dot above it is the inflatable buoy that marks the left end of the line.

The seven Volvo 65s are easy to recognize because of their sponsor graphics. Lining up on starboard tack in that group in the lower left, AkzoNobel is in front with the purple and blue sails. They were skippered in this race by navigator Jules Salter, because previous skipper Simeon Tienpont quit/was fired a few days earlier. (There are dueling press releases and much drama; it’s all still playing out as of Monday.)

Scallywag is the boat closest to the camera with the gray sails and the red and white swoosh. Vestas/11th Hour is the light blue main with the dark blue stripe and the white headsail, and Dongfeng is the red and gray sails beyond them.

Coming toward us to the left of them on port tack is Brunel, whose strategy apparently was to swoop in behind the other boats and tack onto starboard at the last minute. But tacking one of these boats with a Masthead Code 0 in light winds is a tricky maneuver.

Just coming into view in the extreme lower left is Turn the Tide on Plastic (TTToP), skippered by Goofball Boat Mom Dee Caffari. They haven’t even unrolled their Code 0 yet. But that’s fine; the boats in front of them are early and will have to kill time.

Way up at the other end of the line, that little red mainsail is MAPFRE. Like TTToP they haven’t unrolled their headsail yet. They’re just hanging out, jogging slowly toward the pin end of the line. The race commentators are going to offer them premature condolences in a minute. But with the benefit of hindsight, looking at this image: They’ve already won.

image

With 1:11 to go, Brunel is making their tack. They’re slow rolling up the headsail (a requirement for tacking the Masthead 0), though, and it’s going to hurt them badly. On TTToP, Boat Mom has unrolled her headsail and is starting to move into view in the lower left. Meanwhile, MAPFRE is still just chilling out there at the far end of the line.

image

With less than a minute to go, AkzoNobel is bearing off to avoid being over early. Vestas has them pinned to leeward, though, so there’s not a lot of room. Brunel is head to wind with their headsail furled. It’s been 13 seconds since the last screenshot, which means this tack is taking them a long time. Boat Mom is diving down to try to squeeze in to leeward of Scallywag.

MAPFRE still hasn’t unrolled their headsail.

image

At 47 seconds to go, the four starboard-tack boats closest to the line are all reaching off to avoid being over early.

MAPFRE’s just hanging out. Um, guys (and gals): You realize there’s a race today, right?

image

Thirty-seven seconds to go. The three lead starboard tack boats are a mess. Dongfeng has the right of way as leeward boat, and is holding the other two up toward the line rather than giving them acceleration room. Scallywag is diving down to prevent Boat Mom getting a leeward overlap and doing the same thing to them. Brunel has completed their tack, but they’re so far below the line and in such disturbed air from all the shenanigans ahead of them that they’re basically stuck in the water.

Aboard MAPFRE they finally have a headsail, yay! But that’s not all they’ve got:

  • They’re right up on the starting line, rather than 3-5 boatlengths to leeward of it like the other boats. In these conditions that’s huge.
  • They’ve got clear air.
  • They’ve got an open stretch of water into which they can accelerate.
  • They’ve got a position that in a minute is going to give them the right side of the racecourse, where they’ve (correctly) predicted the wind is going to be stronger during the coming beat.

On the other hand they’re on port tack, and every other boat has the right of way, so they’re basically going to have to duck the entire fleet. But given all the advantages listed above, it’s worth it.

image

Thirty seconds. The lead group of starboard tackers has hardened up for the line, though they’re still a little early. Each of them is trying to create a gap to leeward into which they can accelerate. But since they’re all trying to do it in the same place none of them is being particularly successful.

Meanwhile, MAPFRE is reaching off with the Masthead 0 trimmed for speed.

image

Twenty seconds. The leading five starboard tackers are all using whatever gap they have to try to build speed. Brunel is still stuck to leeward.

MAPFRE has started to bear away to go below the starboard tackers. It’s a controlled maneuver, though, unlike the speed-killing gyrations the other boats are doing.

image

Ten seconds. The starboard-tackers are all hardening up for the line. Brunel is basically parked.

It’s hard to see them, but MAPFRE is screaming in (relatively speaking) on port tack, aiming to shave the sterns of the fleet.

Here’s what that moment looked like from MAPFRE’s perspective, courtesy of the video they posted to Twitter:

image

They’re approaching Dongfeng, the lead boat in the starboard-tackers. Antonio Cuervas-Mons (”Ñeti”) is on the bow. As bowman his job is to tell the helmsman (Pablo Arrarte) where to go, because it’s easier to judge the distances from the bow.

The closed-fist gesture means “hold your course.” The wind-it-up gesture means “go for it; head closer to the starting line.”

image

Ñeti calling the duck of AkzoNobel. This is a key moment. Looking around the front of the headsail, Ñeti sees something that Pablo on the helm can’t see: Brunel is going so slowly that a gap has opened up in front of them, and MAPFRE has a chance to squeeze through. So Ñeti gives the wind-it-up sign: go for it.

image

That same moment, two seconds before the starting gun, from the helicopter’s perspective.

image

MAPFRE charging through the gap just after the gun. They’re now in disturbed air, but only for a few seconds, and the speed they’ve built up lets them punch through.

image

And they’re off, heading away from the fleet in clear air toward the stronger wind on the right. When the fleet comes back together at the top mark MAPFRE is ahead, and with mistake-free sailing they never give up the lead.

And that, long-suffering readers, is how you win a boat race before it’s even started.

¡Vamos MAPFRE! 😀

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First win for MAPFRE in Volvo Ocean Race

Saturday, October 14th, 2017

First win for MAPFRE in Volvo Ocean Race:

a-solitary-sea-rover:

Alicante, Spain (October 14, 2017) – The local heroes on Xabi Fernàndez’s MAPFRE were a popular winner when they won the first In-Port Race of the 2017-18 Volvo Ocean Race.

Fernàndez and his team made a bold call at the start to duck behind the entire fleet in order to sail up what turned out to be the favoured right hand side of the course, coming from behind to earn a narrow lead at the first gate.

The video of the race was streamed on Facebook, which is a little disappointing because the FB video player is inferior to YouTube. Hard to obsess properly when the fullscreen video gets way pixellated. :-)

But yay for MAPFRE! The in-port standings only count if needed for a tiebreaker in terms of the overall race, but this is real (finally). And now it’s less than a week until the first ocean leg starts.

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Annalise Murphy on Twitter

Thursday, October 12th, 2017

Annalise Murphy on Twitter:

tfw one sail on your new boat weighs more than your whole last boat. 😜

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