nutfisk: time out mind

Posted by jbc on September 25th, 2018 at 5:04 pm

nutfisk:

time out mind

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/178464240352.

Photo

Posted by jbc on September 25th, 2018 at 12:04 pm

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/178456303286.

the-pasta-pack:A young Least Tern (Sternula antillarum) takes…

Posted by jbc on September 25th, 2018 at 7:09 am

the-pasta-pack:

A young Least Tern (Sternula antillarum) takes flight.

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/178448797072.

permagrinphoto: Northern Parula #305Found one myself, in the…

Posted by jbc on September 24th, 2018 at 8:59 pm

permagrinphoto:

Northern Parula

#305

Found one myself, in the tipu trees in downtown Carp. It takes a certain (smallish) effort for someone like me, introvert, to walk around a city street with binoculars and a camera staring into the treetops. But then I see a bird like this and suddenly I don’t care at all.

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/178437078201.

imposer:by Roberto Bertero

Posted by jbc on September 24th, 2018 at 5:04 pm

imposer:

by Roberto Bertero

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/178431366099.

feadae: So I woke up this morning and went “Oh, shoot, I missed…

Posted by jbc on September 24th, 2018 at 12:04 pm

feadae:

So I woke up this morning and went “Oh, shoot, I missed H.G. Wells’ birthday! Oh, well, I’ll just bang out something really quickly before I move on to my real-life responsibilities. Art noob that I am, it won’t take too long and it’ll be terrible, but it’s the thought that counts. An hour or two at the most.”

S E V E N  G O D D A M N  H O U R S  L A T E R

And I’m actually really freaking proud of the result! I’d be prouder if it were freehand (which it’s not; it’s tons of tracing), but it involved me using Autodesk Sketchbook for the first time and figuring out all that nonsense, so I’m proud of it!

Happy birthday, H.G.!

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/178423072703.

lazyjacks: US-9, 30 square meter – Marblehead Leslie Jones,…

Posted by jbc on September 24th, 2018 at 7:09 am

lazyjacks:

US-9, 30 square meter – Marblehead
Leslie Jones, August 1932
Boston Public Library Print Department, Leslie Jones Collection
Accession # 08_06_012836

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/178415404014.

brooklynbridgebirds:Blackpoll Warbler (female)Brooklyn Bridge…

Posted by jbc on September 23rd, 2018 at 10:19 pm

brooklynbridgebirds:

Blackpoll Warbler (female)
Brooklyn Bridge Park, Pier 1

#304

One had been seen all week at Winchester One, a pocket park in Goleta with some lerped eucalyptus and a bunch of migrating warblers. I couldn’t get out there to chase it until today, but I finally did, and the bird was kind enough both to be there and to pose for a fuzzy documentation photo. Yay!

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/178406027751.

Unproblematic faves

Posted by jbc on September 23rd, 2018 at 6:29 pm

Unproblematic faves

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/178399718316.

This concert is very on-brand.(b/c that’s half the Thompson Twins doing “Lies.”)

Posted by jbc on September 23rd, 2018 at 5:39 pm

This concert is very on-brand.

(b/c that’s half the Thompson Twins doing “Lies.”)

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/178398318771.

90377: Pogórze Ciężkowicko-Rożnowskie, Kąśna Dolna, Poland by…

Posted by jbc on September 23rd, 2018 at 5:09 pm

90377:

Pogórze Ciężkowicko-Rożnowskie, Kąśna Dolna, Poland by Piotr Ramijan

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/178397453223.

Sometimes when I’m birdwatching

Posted by jbc on September 23rd, 2018 at 7:04 am

Sometimes when I’m birdwatching

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/178380299046.

Sometimes when I’m birdwatching

Posted by jbc on September 22nd, 2018 at 5:01 pm

Sometimes when I’m birdwatching

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/178362376578.

lady-arryn:anonymous requested: jane austen + favourite romantic…

Posted by jbc on September 22nd, 2018 at 12:06 pm

lady-arryn:

anonymous requested: jane austen + favourite romantic relationship

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/178354604786.

90377: Untitled by *LiliAnn*

Posted by jbc on September 22nd, 2018 at 7:02 am

90377:

Untitled by *LiliAnn*

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/178346956470.

Its is a truth universally acknowledged that

Posted by jbc on September 21st, 2018 at 5:01 pm

thefangirl-nextdoor:

Poe Party is an amazing piece of comedy, drama, and all around entertainment! thanks you @shipwreckedcomedy

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/178329680727.

90377: 9-8-18 Morning Fog by Mike DeLoye

Posted by jbc on September 21st, 2018 at 12:01 pm

90377:

9-8-18 Morning Fog by Mike DeLoye

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/178322022420.

Sometimes when I’m birdwatching

Posted by jbc on September 21st, 2018 at 7:01 am

Sometimes when I’m birdwatching

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/178314725788.

I’ve just happened upon your fabulous tumblr and have an inquiry. I have been wanting to teach my child who is 9 yo more about botany. I’m a casual fan of it, and not a great teacher. I feel like I get too caught up in the details for him to follow. So, my question is, where could I start? Do you have any resources that could help me in teaching a child this age? I want to make a book of the plant life he can find in our local area with him but want to do it in a way that will be memorable.

Posted by jbc on September 20th, 2018 at 5:01 pm

(tbh i think the biggest mistake we make when teaching botany to kids is that we dont show them the cool parts. like when we teach kids about animals we show them lions and tigers and elephants and stuff that they may never see in their lives, and then when we get to plants we show them like. petunias and the parts of a flower and that’s it. kids are always enthralled learning about venus fly traps when they learn about them (because they’re cool as hell), but then we fall flat when talking about how they’re a plant you can stumble across in north and south carolina, and how they contribute to the ecosystem there and can be poached just like an endangered rhino or elephant could be. 

i remember when i was younger i was under the impression that there were cool and exotic plants and ecosystems somewhere in some dense forest in asia or africa, but certainly nothing strange here, where i live. i was under the impression that i was just unlucky in that i lived in a really boring place for that sort of thing. and then i got older and realized that there were plants around me i never knew existed.

for instance, i was told at a carnivorous plant conference this year that every state in the US has a native carnivorous plant. i thought, “Bullshit, not where i live!”. when i got back to school i searched through our herbarium and found a Utricularia specimen collected in 1975…..in the county right next to where i was born and raised (side note: Utricularia is one of those unappreciated carnivorous plants. they live in still water and waterlogged environments where they put down very, very tiny vacuum-sealed bladders; when microorganisms swim by them, they hit the hairs to trigger the traps and get sucked into the pouch, where they’re then digested. the current theory is that venus fly traps evolved from these!)

in high school, i started learning about thermogenic plants, which are plants that heat up. i was under the impression that they were all very far from me…until i found a species that lived in a protected reserve in rural iowa literally 20 minutes away from my house. it’s a remnant ice age population of about 200-400 plants, and knowing that they were there and had always been was incredible. i went and hung out with them about once every couple months in high school. 

so i think the best way to go about it would be to work backwards. native plants are awesome, but when we go to teach animals we don’t start with the native birds in our area; we have to get kids interested first, and then we use that interest to apply it to the things already around us. carnivorous plants are bomb af, and again, there’s a wide range to choose from there (fun fact, we now know that carnivory in plants evolved multiple times independently, so you can find them scattered in with completely normal non-carnivorous relatives!). 

as for resources, documentaries are awesome because they show a good broad range of strange species from across the globe (not just carnivorous plants and titan arums). i made a post with my faves here, and lot of them are on youtube. many of the botanists i met at the carnivorous plant conference this summer became enthralled with them in childhood and found themselves falling into botany because of them (there’s still a lot we don’t know about The Hungry Lads)! 

also one last thing: i have to recommend for you or him one of my fave non-academic botany books of all time, The Plant Messiah by KEW botanical horticulturalist and local lily pad nerd Carlos Magdalena. his entire job is literally rescuing native plants from the brink of extinction, and this book is basically him talking about his adventures in the field and his passion for botany (and also what he had to do to start his career in it). you may know him as the dude who saved the world’s smallest (and most adorable) lily pad species from extinction. this is him in the KEW’s lily pond, holding one of said Small Lads up for comparison with the world’s largest species: 

image

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/178297208290.

dendroica:Summer Azure, Celastrina neglecta (by me)

Posted by jbc on September 20th, 2018 at 12:01 pm

dendroica:

Summer Azure, Celastrina neglecta (by me)

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/178289331257.