Archive for the 'Tumblr' Category

Have you thought about writing a book? Perhaps for the feelings that the Tumblr community can relate to? I Enjoy your blog!

Saturday, October 25th, 2014

Actually, yes. Largely in response to some of the very cool things I’ve come to appreciate via Tumblr over the last few years, I did indeed begin work on a book during last year’s NaNoWriMo. I completed 50,000 words of my first draft that November, and went on to complete that draft in March (I think?) of this year.

I’m now working my way through a second draft, tightening up the story and filling in some missing pieces. I’m about 1/3 of the way through that. When that’s done I intend to start showing it to a few people and getting feedback, while I work on a third and hopefully final draft.

It’s young adult fiction, loosely based on my own teenage experiences growing up in southern California in the late 1970s. It was heavily influenced by Eleanor & Park, which I loved, in that it’s a love story told from alternating boy/girl perspectives. It also features offshore sailboat racing, of the sort I engaged in during that time.

When I read descriptions of bad fanfic I recognize things I’ve done in it, so I think there’s a good chance that’s all it is or ever will be. Other times, though, the characters seem like real people to me, their plight the sort of thing that can make my heart race or my eyes get misty. But I’m easily influenced in that direction, so who knows?

Thank you for the question, and for saying you enjoy my blog. That means a lot to me.

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Heh. According to Team SCA’s official app, no one is on…

Saturday, October 25th, 2014



Heh. According to Team SCA’s official app, no one is on watch. I guess the boat is sailing itself. Good job, boat!

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radivs: ‘Red-tailed Hawk’ by Rick Dobson

Saturday, October 25th, 2014



radivs:

'Red-tailed Hawk' by Rick Dobson

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October—with a gorgeous pageant of colour… Never had she…

Saturday, October 25th, 2014




















October—with a gorgeous pageant of colour… Never had she imagined anything so splendid. A great, tinted peace. Blue, wind-winnowed skies. Sunlight sleeping in the glades of that fairyland. Long dreamy purple days paddling idly in their canoe along shores and up the rivers of crimson and gold. A sleepy, red hunter’s moon. Enchanted tempests that stripped the leaves from the trees and heaped them along the shores. Flying shadows of clouds. What had all the smug, opulent lands out front to compare with this? —L.M. Montgomery in The Blue Castle

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Able Was I Ere I Sailed into the Saint Helena High As the VOR…

Saturday, October 25th, 2014





Able Was I Ere I Sailed into the Saint Helena High

As the VOR fleet sails south past Brazil a key decision is how close to hug the coast. Vestas, which previously made the gutsy call of splitting to the east of the fleet in the doldrums, now appears to have made another gutsy call. In the past 12 hours they’ve cut well to the inshore side of the two leaders. It puts them farther from the finish in Cape Town, but if it means they sail in stronger wind it could be worth it.

The big decision coming up is how to cross the Saint Helena High, that big dark patch of low winds in the forecast map above. Once the boats are south of it and into the westerlies of the Roaring Forties they’re going to be gone. Did you see that photo of SCA surfing at 30 knots I posted last night? They’re going to be doing that, except they’ll be doing it while surfing the huge waves that roll up from the Southern Ocean. It’s going to be wild, probably some of the hairiest sailing they’ll do until they dive deep into the Southern Ocean in Leg 5.

But first there’s that Saint Helena High to get across. It’s named after the remote South Atlantic Island where Napolean was sent to live out his life after he escaped from Elba and ruled for the Hundred Days. I’ve wondered what it must have been like for him there, so isolated, while the events of the world passed him by.

Any VOR racers who make the wrong call cutting across the high are going to get a chance to know how he felt. They’ll be sitting with no wind while the rest of the fleet turns the corner and takes off.

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/100924850656.

rosiealumbaugh: This week’s cover: ‘Into the Woods’ enchants…

Saturday, October 25th, 2014









rosiealumbaugh:

This week’s cover: ‘Into the Woods‘ enchants EW’s holiday movie preview

OH MY GOSH. I’m really happy about how The Wolf is a man in a costume rather than total CG.  I love it more now.  Still mad about that song getting removed.  Still kinda hopeful.  MIXED FEELINGS.  Also kinda upset that people on my dash have been reblogging stuff about it, saying that it’s a Disney Musical.  IT IS NOT.  It’s a Sondheim musical, and it is being adapted for the screen under Disney’s company label.  Sondheim, friends, is a boss.

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/100913081911.

rosiealumbaugh: popculturebrain: Hey, this ‘Into the Woods’…

Saturday, October 25th, 2014



rosiealumbaugh:

popculturebrain:

Hey, this ‘Into the Woods‘ featurette actually features some singing. And it looks pretty good.

(2:30 for Meryl Streep’s “Stay With Me”)

THIS THIS ALL OF THE THIS

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/100912851071.

rosiealumbaugh: Into the Woods (2014) I was born to watch…

Saturday, October 25th, 2014





















rosiealumbaugh:

Into the Woods (2014)

I was born to watch this movie

Oooh! There’s a longer trailer!

Someone’s next few minutes just got booked solid. :-)

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/100912183636.

atraversso: Sea by Rob Walwyn

Saturday, October 25th, 2014



atraversso:

Sea by Rob Walwyn

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/100911847047.

Peter Gabriel, “Digging in the Dirt.” From Secret…

Friday, October 24th, 2014



Peter Gabriel, “Digging in the Dirt.”

From Secret World Live, recorded November 16 – 17, 1993, Palasport Nuovo, Modena, Italy.

I may have watched the laserdisc of this until I wore it out. This is the remastered version, which I know because the vocals sound way more remixed/produced than the already-heavily-touched-up vocals of the original release. Peter never can leave the vocals alone…

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My favorite from today’s batch of on-board VOR videos….

Friday, October 24th, 2014



My favorite from today’s batch of on-board VOR videos. Eric Peron on Dongfeng makes a trip to the bow wearing a helmet cam reminiscent of the rig Peter Garbriel used for “Digging in the Dirt” on the Secret World tour.

Really gives a sense of what it’s like to work the pointy end on a VOR 65.

Reposted from http://ift.tt/1tSAhvc.

Then and Now I wanted to talk a little bit about why the VOR 65…

Friday, October 24th, 2014





Then and Now

I wanted to talk a little bit about why the VOR 65 amazes me, and in particular how it differs from the boats I raced on growing up. And it kind of got long, so here’s a cut. :-)

The left image above is Desperado, a Swan 65, sistership to Sayula II, the boat that won the first Whitbread (which later became the Volvo) in 1973-74. On the right is SCA, one of the boats currently sailing south through the Atlantic on Leg 1 of this year’s race. All the boats this year are identically built VOR 65s.

Both boats pictured above are the same length, and are sailing downwind with a decent breeze, conditions that allow them to reach their top speed. Desperado is going about 11 knots. SCA is sailing closer to 30.

To be fair, Desperado doesn’t have as much wind as SCA does. But even if it were blowing harder in the Desperado photo it wouldn’t make much difference. The fastest that Desperado can ever sail is about 13-14 knots — and that requires big following seas, with the boat on the edge of control.

Why is a VOR 65 so much faster than a Swan 65? Mainly, weight. A Swan 65 weighs (displaces, in nautical terms) slightly more than 76,000 pounds. A VOR 65 weighs less than a third of that.

If you wanted to race a boat around the world in 1973, a Swan 65 was the boat you wanted: big, strong, and heavy. A Swan 65 is built like a tank. The hull and rig are made strong so they don’t break in rough conditions. The boat is heavily ballasted, with 30,000 pounds of lead in the keel, meaning the boat has a lot of “righting moment”. That is, when the wind pushes sideways on the boat it can resist heeling, generating a lot of power. Because the boat is already so heavy, it can carry a lot of gear and provisions without much of a performance penalty. A Swan 65 interior is luxurious, with lots of wood-paneled accommodations. Those were the days…

But let’s switch gears for a second and talk about waves. The speed of a wave is directly related to its length. The longer the wave, the faster it travels.

When you push a heavy boat through the water, that water has to get out of the way, and it does so by forming a standing wave that travels along with the boat. You can see it in that picture of Deperado above. There’s a crest up by the bow, another near the stern, and a deep dip in the middle.

A heavy boat sailing at maximum speed builds up a standing wave that is roughly as long as the boat itself: in this case, 65 feet. A wave that length always travels at the same speed: 11 knots. That’s pretty much the Swan 65’s speed limit, its so-called “hull speed”. The boat can’t go faster than that, because it gets stuck in the trough of the standing wave it’s creating. To go any faster it would have to climb up on top of its bow wave, to leave the water, no longer displacing it but instead planing on top of it like a surfboard.

Which is exactly what SCA is doing in the photo above.

If you push a Swan 65 hard enough it can surf. But it’s not good at it. The hull is built curvy, to fit into that standing wave. That’s great at sub-planing speeds; it means the hull has minimal drag and can reach its hull speed quickly. But it’s awful for surfing.

But the main problem in getting a Swan 65 to surf is weight. It takes a huge amount of energy to lift those 76,000 pounds out of the water.

People back in the 1970s knew how to make a sailboat that surfed. High-performance planing dinghies like the 470 surfed great. All you had to do was give the boat a lot of sail area, a flat-bottomed hull, and make it super light.

Ta-da! A boat that surfs:

Look familiar? Except for the size of the boat, that picture is pretty much identical to the one above of SCA.

Back in the 1970s a few people had tried building bigger racing boats designed to surf offshore. But those boats were considered specialized toys only good for races that were mostly downwind, like coastal races from southern California to Mexico, or the Transpac race from California to Hawaii. They weren’t good for sailing upwind because they didn’t have enough righting moment. And you wouldn’t think about taking one in the Around the World Race.

A planing dinghy like a 470 can sail fast upwind because despite being very light overall, what weight it does have is mostly in the form of the crew’s body weight, and that ballast is highly mobile. If you hike out (as the skipper and crew are doing in that image above), you can get enough righting moment for the boat to power its way upwind. And then you turn around the windward mark and zing! It’s off to the races.

A VOR 65 is built to do the same thing:

  • The boat’s hull has the same fine entry and long, flat sections aft that a planing dinghy has.
  • It uses lightweight daggerboards for lateral resistance.
  • Its ballast is in the form of a lead torpedo that can be canted to windward using hydraulics. In effect, a VOR 65’s crew hikes their ballast to windward just like a 470 does.
  • The boat also has ballast tanks that can be filled with sea water, or emptied when sailing off the wind.
  • The crew constantly shifts the boat’s gear to the upwind side. That happens below, on every tack, and on deck as well, where the onboard video shows the crews constantly wrestling the big sausages of the sails they’re not currently using into the optimal position.
  • Finally, the boat itself is light, light, light.

A Swan 65 was built from hand-laid fiberglass. It was strong, but heavy. On a VOR 65, everything is made from carbon fiber. The boat’s interior is super spartan. Every ounce that can be eliminated has been. Except for necessary structural elements, the interior is completely open and unfurnished. The bunks are carbon-fiber pipe berths — and the crews only sleep on the upwind side. The galley is a tiny station with a single-burner camp stove. The nav and media stations can be reconfigured to be operated from either port or starboard, so the crew using them always have their bodies on the high side.

The boats don’t carry drinking water — the fuel to run a desalinator weighs less. The interior of all the boats is black —  because the carbon fiber they’re made from is black, and paint would be needless weight.

Basically, a VOR 65 is a 65-foot 470. The people who sail it are committed enough (and skilled enough) to take such a boat into the roughest, most dangerous waters on the planet and race it flat-out.

So much respect. And bogglement. It’s just… amazing.

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“One day, you’re 17 and you’re planning for someday. And then quietly, without you ever really…”

Friday, October 24th, 2014

“One day, you’re 17 and you’re planning for someday. And then quietly, without you ever really noticing, someday is today. And then someday is yesterday. And this is your life.”

John Green  (via schlafwandel)

Now that this has 500,000 notes, I should probably reiterate that I never said or wrote this. This is a quote from the series finale of the television program One Tree Hill.

(via fishingboatproceeds)

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mariposaduende: Haven’t used Instagram in ages but I feel like…

Friday, October 24th, 2014



mariposaduende:

Haven’t used Instagram in ages but I feel like changing that. A view of this pretty river on my way to the hospital to do my Thursday morning volunteering yesterday. #winnipeg #manitoba #canada #autumn #fall #rivers #trees #nature

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FIRST OFF: I don’t want to age you. 50 is not old, sir. SECONDLY, I wanted to tell you how interesting and exciting your posts about sailing and boating are. My dad was a sailor for a long time, and he always tells stories of the ‘high seas’ and it’s really great to see him enjoy talking, and I really enjoy hearing about his travels. Your posts remind me of how cool it is, and my dad and I read your posts together. It’s really special. Thanks! ~Rosie, 16 yrs.

Friday, October 24th, 2014

Thank you very much. That’s very kind of you to say.

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“I don’t do fancy frontend shit. I do backend shit.”

Friday, October 24th, 2014

“I don’t do fancy frontend shit. I do backend shit.”

codingjester (via abrad45)

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/100851726756.

beautifulmars: Gorgeous Geology in Arabia Terra

Friday, October 24th, 2014







beautifulmars:

Gorgeous Geology in Arabia Terra

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/100850509566.

kattheghosthunter: I’m getting real tired of these Sponsored Posts. They’re obnoxious. I’m seeing…

Friday, October 24th, 2014

kattheghosthunter:

I’m getting real tired of these Sponsored Posts. They’re obnoxious. I’m seeing enough of them that it’s like following a very active, shitty, blog.

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As I’m writing this (1545 UTC on October 24, 2014), the…

Friday, October 24th, 2014











As I’m writing this (1545 UTC on October 24, 2014), the VOR fleet should be in the process of rounding the Fernando de Noronha islands off the coast of Brazil. It will be a while before the tracker on the website updates, but when it does I expect that ADOR and Brunel will have rounded. By the next update at 1840 Vestas probably will as well, and the trailing four boats should round later tonight (their time, which will be this afternoon from my vantage point in California).

Things get kind of interesting then, as you can see from the wind overlay in the excellent fan tracker operated by voldia. A straight shot to Cape Town would be upwind, which is slow, and would take them into a region of high pressure and light winds, which is also slow. The fastest route will probably be to head south along the coast of South America until they reach the vicinity of Uruguay (roughly at the same latitude as Cape Town), then a fast run east to the finish, hopefully helped along by the high winds of a storm system, if they can arrange to catch one of those.

It’s a part of the race where getting the strategy right can make a huge difference, so it’s definitely not over for the boats at the back of the fleet. Also, since the overall result is based on combined finish rankings from all the legs, every position matters. No one’s going to be giving up.

Image credits:  From the airplane down to Fernando de Noronha – view from North-East, by Wikimedia user Maggiz, used under a Creative Commons Attribution Sharealike 3.0 Unported license. And Fernando de Noronha, by Flickr user Roberto Garrido. Used under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic license.

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coffeenuts: kateoplis:Fantastic Fungi

Friday, October 24th, 2014

















coffeenuts:

kateoplis:Fantastic Fungi

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