Archive for the 'Tumblr' Category

“Needle was Robb and Bran and Rickon, her mother and her father,…

Monday, April 27th, 2015


















“Needle was Robb and Bran and Rickon, her mother and her father, even Sansa. Needle was Winterfell’s grey walls, and the laughter of its people. Needle was the summer snows, Old Nan’s stories, the heart tree with its red leaves and scary face, the warm earthy smell of the glass gardens, the sound of the north wind rattling the shutters of her room. Needle was Jon Snow’s smile. He used to mess my hair and call me “little sister,” she remembered, and suddenly there were tears in her eyes.”

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Campo the Scuola di San Rocco, circa 1882, John Singer Sargent

Monday, April 27th, 2015




Campo the Scuola di San Rocco, circa 1882, John Singer Sargent

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Monday, April 27th, 2015



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pintoras: Anna Boberg (Swedish, 1864 – 1935): Svolvaer Harbour…

Monday, April 27th, 2015



pintoras:

Anna Boberg (Swedish, 1864 – 1935): Svolvaer Harbour at the Height of the Fishing Season.Study from Lofoten (via Stockholm Nationalmuseum)

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art-is-art-is-art:In the Norvegienne Boat at Giverny, Claude…

Sunday, April 26th, 2015



art-is-art-is-art:

In the Norvegienne Boat at Giverny, Claude Monet

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libutron: The giant Lewis’ Moon Snail – Neverita lewisii…

Sunday, April 26th, 2015





libutron:

The giant Lewis’ Moon Snail – Neverita lewisii (Syn. Euspira lewisii)

Lewis’ Moon Snail, Neverita lewisii (Gastropoda – Naticidae), is a huge sea snail native to the Pacific Ocean coast of North America, from Canada to Baja California, Mexico). This is the largest of the moon snails, with shells up to 13 cm in diameter, however a fully expanded animal is several times larger than its shell. The snails plough forward with a foot just below the surface of the sand. When extended, the foot can measure over 30 cm in diameter.

Moon snails feed mostly on clams, mussels, or other mollusks. They are “boring predators”, meaning that they drill through the shell of their prey and ingest the tissue inside. In order to drill a prey item successfully, they must first detect and immobilize their prey, cover it in a mucus sheath and then transport it into the sediment to be drilled. Moon snails use a combination of an acidic enzyme and a “rasping tongue”, the radula, to penetrate their shelled prey. The radula, located at the end of the proboscis, scrapes the surface of the shell as the proboscis rotates 90 degrees, resulting in a fairly round and smooth borehole with an inner and outer edge. The accessory boring organ, located in the snail’s foot, secretes the acidic enzyme to soften the shell of the prey.

References: [1] – [2] – [3] – [4]

Photo credits: [Top: ©Ann Dornfeld | Locality: Alki Pipeline, Seattle, Washington, US, 2009] – [Bottom: ©Megan Asche | Locality: Olympia, Washington, US, 2013]

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Sunday, April 26th, 2015







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Sunday, April 26th, 2015



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“There’s something slightly special about a treecreeper. They’re one of those birds you find in…”

Saturday, April 25th, 2015

“There’s something slightly special about a treecreeper. They’re one of those birds you find in bird-books as a beginner and never believe you will actually see. Part of you doesn’t really believe they even exist. The bird book says they’re common: and so the bird-book is obviously lying. Perhaps there should be a special category for such birds: Category L birds: the birds the birdbooks lie about. The truth, of course, is that treecreepers are common but not commonly seen. There are quite a few birds like that.”

Eddie’s treecreeper | Simon Barnes

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marykatewiles: Happy birthday @yulinononeleg!

Saturday, April 25th, 2015



marykatewiles:

Happy birthday @yulinononeleg!

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Video

Saturday, April 25th, 2015



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sylvia-morris: an eternal self-belief. by Sylvia…

Saturday, April 25th, 2015



sylvia-morris:

an eternal self-belief. by Sylvia Morris

(response to Toyin Odutola’s Art Assignment)

Keep reading

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pinkmanjesse:do you ever looked back at a friendship with someone from the internet and think to…

Saturday, April 25th, 2015

pinkmanjesse:

do you ever looked back at a friendship with someone from the internet and think to yourself, “i’m so glad i decided to befriend them because they make me so happy”

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art-traveller: Vincent van Gogh, Roses  1890

Saturday, April 25th, 2015



art-traveller:

Vincent van Gogh, Roses 

1890

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Saturday, April 25th, 2015







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Horace is the best.

Friday, April 24th, 2015



Horace is the best.

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dappledwithshadow:Gustav Klimt

Friday, April 24th, 2015















dappledwithshadow:

Gustav Klimt

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sea-passion:Big Sur, California

Friday, April 24th, 2015



sea-passion:

Big Sur, California

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sailseaplymouth: crazy good! new stuff from We Were Evergreen

Friday, April 24th, 2015



sailseaplymouth:

crazy good! new stuff from We Were Evergreen

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Blackfish

Friday, April 24th, 2015

arlluk:

horsechild:

dani-kin:

arlluk:

horsechild:

I want to know how many of the anti-captivity or anti-zoo or anti-orcas in captivity people had that viewpoint before seeing Blackfish.

You all are jumping onto a bandwagon of righteousness without questioning the (incredibly biased) source, or bothering to research the other side.

I had someone on here message me that we could just release the orcas in captivity into the wild, and as long as they are released in the right place, they will be fine. That is utterly and completely incorrect.

Normally, I wouldn’t waste the energy to be bothered by this. People have the right to their own opinions, no matter how much I may disagree. But with this issue in particular, there are laws being considered and vast public opinion being changed based on a biased, utterly incorrect “documentary.” It hurts and will hurt living, breathing animals. And not just some animals, but many.

People, analyze what you are saying and reblogging. Read the accounts and rebuttals from people actually involved in the care and training of these animals. If you care so much for the orcas and other animals in captivity, so thorough research. Humans have so much influence over these animals’ whole worlds. You owe it to them to at least make sure your information is correct, not just based on one documentary.

I was against captivity long before Blackfish was released. So are a lot of the people here on whale tumblr.

I am against captivity because I trust orca scientists and their peer-reviewed papers, not an entertainment corporation that stands to profit off the whales.

Me too.  I was actually convinced by David Kirby’s journalistic expose on Seaworld’s corporate malfeasance Death at Sea World, which was published a full year before Blackfish.  I mean, Blackfish is great, don’t get me wrong, its cool to raise awareness and I was glad to see someone make a documentary about it.  But there is so much more depth to why it is totally inappropriate to keep killer whales in captivity than you can get into in a 2 hour documentary.  

What do you propose we do with the whales currently in captivity?

One of the most frustrating and irritating parts about orca captivity is there really is no perfect solution when it comes to figuring out what to do with the captive whales. Clearly, they are not doing well in their current environments, but moving them to other environments (release, sea pens, ect.) also present challenges that are not easily overcome.

Most have been too mentally/physically damaged by their time in captivity (e.g the whole lack of teeth thing) so they cannot be released into the wild. There are a few orcas that could potentially be candidates for release into the wild, such as Lolita or the recently captured orcas in Russia, but the vast majority would not survive. 

Sea pens/ocean sanctuaries are another popular solution (and I really do like this idea), but these too have their issues. Sea pens for one or two orcas are definitely in the realm of possibility, but a large sanctuary with multiple whales and multiple pens is logistically and financially tricky and I honestly don’t think that’s something that will happen in the near future. 

At this point in time, in my opinion, the cheapest and most viable solution to ending orca captivity is halting breeding and allowing the captive orcas to stay where they are until they die, with perhaps some improvements in tank size, enrichment programs, and overall whale social structure. I don’t like this solution, I really truly don’t (because the whales are still going to suffer) but I don’t know of any other alternatives that are feasible at the moment. 

I hope that with time somebody will figure out a way to make ocean sanctuaries work because that would really increase the animals’ quality of life. Perhaps if there was some cooperation among marine parks and scientists, this would be possible. 

The sad thing is that orcas should have never been in captivity to begin with. Simply being in human care has stripped them of what it means to be an orca. They are no longer able to function normally, and because of this, it makes finding a perfect solution pretty damn hard. 

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