hiimlesphotos:Seed Picker

Friday, October 23rd, 2020

hiimlesphotos:

Seed Picker

Reposted from https://lies.tumblr.com/post/632810086595788800.

47 that I identified to species. There was also a duck I saw in the distance without being able to…

Wednesday, October 14th, 2020
image

47 that I identified to species. There was also a duck I saw in the distance without being able to identify it to species, and since I had no other ducks that one would count for 48 if you’re inclined to be generous.

I didn’t really pick the spot for maximum species count; if I’d wanted that I would have tried someplace closer to a good variety of habitat, especially wetlands. I was hoping to see a migrating Broad-winged Hawk, a rarity around here, and that spot is one of the best local places for seeing them. I didn’t have any Broad-wings during my Big Sit, but the very next day (last Sunday) I did see two of them just a short distance from there.

The “winner” in terms of local Big Sit bragging rights was Linus, a local birder from whom I learned about the event. He set up at a spot along the coast just west of Santa Barbara and had 72 species (!). Some years a Big Sit team in Los Osos (San Luis Obispo county, not far up the coast from here) has had more than 100 species — not bad for birding in a single day from within a 17-foot-diameter circle.

Links if you’re interested in more details:

My merged eBird list of the whole event:

https://ebird.org/checklist/S74759011

My individual Big Sit eBird lists (these include notes, photos, and audio recordings):

0616 – 0636: https://ebird.org/checklist/S74635127

0637 – 0900: https://ebird.org/checklist/S74642614

0901 – 1100: https://ebird.org/checklist/S74649251

1101 – 1301: https://ebird.org/checklist/S74655739

1302 – 1419: https://ebird.org/checklist/S74659808

Linus’ 72-species list:

https://ebird.org/checklist/S74672150

Reposted from https://lies.tumblr.com/post/632018225641750528.

klemannlee: American Redstart

Thursday, October 1st, 2020

klemannlee:

American Redstart

Reposted from https://lies.tumblr.com/post/630786033680777216.

hiimlesphotos:Flying Water

Saturday, September 26th, 2020

hiimlesphotos:

Flying Water

Reposted from https://lies.tumblr.com/post/630370801988812800.

hiimlesphotos:Bouffant

Wednesday, September 23rd, 2020

hiimlesphotos:

Bouffant

Reposted from https://lies.tumblr.com/post/630099005642260480.

mostlythemarsh: The Plovers

Sunday, September 20th, 2020

mostlythemarsh:

The Plovers

Reposted from https://lies.tumblr.com/post/629830412380864512.

‘Hundreds of thousands, if not millions’: New Mexico sees massive migratory bird deaths

Monday, September 14th, 2020

‘Hundreds of thousands, if not millions’: New Mexico sees massive migratory bird deaths:

perishedoffits:

@lies, have you seen this? I wonder if there’s anything people in SoCal can do. Put out extra water, etc.

I had seen the story come through on bird twitter, but hadn’t read it until now.

Last week I was in the eastern Sierra Nevada, not far from the Creek Fire, and I noticed what seemed like an unusually large number of Yellow-rumped Warblers in the trees around the place we were staying. Like, I’d look out the condo windows and count 20 warblers, most of them first-year birds, flitting around feeding in the pines. It reminded me a little of the Thomas Fire’s aftermath near where I live in southern California, where we appeared to have lots of “refugee” birds in unburned areas during and after the fire. That makes me wonder if the extensive western wildfires might have pushed a lot of migrants out of their normal range or otherwise disrupted their migrations, leading to them heading south to New Mexico while in an insufficiently-nourished state to complete migration successfully.

Molt and migration are hugely costly undertakings for birds. It doesn’t take much disruption for them to get behind their “energy curve” and die in large numbers from starvation. That (of course) is one of the big risks of climate change: by shaking up what had been a relatively stable set of conditions over long time scales it can lead to mass die-offs (and not just for birds).

The article isn’t very detailed, and seems to be playing up the most-ominous-sounding quotes in a way that is intentionally alarming. I’m not trying to dampen anyone’s sense of alarm, but I’m suspicious of quick-hit science reporting that sensationalizes in a ploy for virality and readers. So I’m not sure how worried to be about this without hearing more. The article mentions that the dead birds are being examined to try to determine cause of death, which will be helpful in terms of trying to figure out the bigger picture.

Thanks for mentioning it. It’s definitely interesting and concerning.

Reposted from https://lies.tumblr.com/post/629266807392518144.

Fun facts about my thousandth consecutive day of submitting at…

Sunday, September 13th, 2020

Fun facts about my thousandth consecutive day of submitting at least one complete eBird checklist:

* The smoke wasn’t (quite) as bad as it has been, so I didn’t feel like I was chain-smoking as I walked the beach.

* The Lesser Yellowlegs is still hanging around at the mouth of Carpinteria Creek. After working so hard to get them on my county year list a few months ago I appreciate this one just chilling five minutes from my house for so long.

* The big Willet flock at Tar Pits Park was cool. Mixed in with them were Long-billed Curlews, Whimbrels, and Black-bellied Plovers.

* The trio of Black Turnstones foraging in the wrack let me get super close.

* I saw my first Say’s Phoebe of the fall. A few had been reported already; Nick had one at Coal Oil Point on September 4. But I hadn’t seen one yet, and I love them, so when I saw this one it made me happy.

* I liked seeing the Elegant Terns with the faint pink wash on their breast; it helped set them apart from the slightly larger Royal Terns they were roosting with.

Reposted from https://lies.tumblr.com/post/629166402310438912.

mostlythemarsh: Four and Twenty

Friday, September 4th, 2020

mostlythemarsh:

Four and Twenty

Reposted from https://lies.tumblr.com/post/628377666825928704.

perishedoffits: birdingnorthamerica: Double-crested cormorant…

Saturday, August 29th, 2020

perishedoffits:

birdingnorthamerica:

Double-crested cormorant and a lone juvenile gull, Franklin ME.

@lies, what is the difference between a juvenile and immature bird?

Juvenile is a more-specific term. It refers to the first plumage the young bird has when it’s first out on its own. Immature in the broad sense just means the not yet mature (adult) plumage. In a more narrow sense I see it used to refer to plumages that come after the juvenile plumage but before the adult plumage.

Gulls go through a whole fascinating sequence of plumage changes. The bird in this photo does indeed look like a juvenile. I’m guessing it might be a young Ring-billed Gull, though I’m not sure.

Fun fact: Although this photo was taken in Maine, if that is indeed a RBGU it’s a species we also have out where I live in California, and was one of the “Big Four” local species I talked about in our birdwatching group’s Zoom meeting this week:

https://youtu.be/lKiG6tNaAhY

birds, youtube, rbgu. Posted in Tumblr by jbc | Permalink | No Comments »

birdingnorthamerica:Double-crested cormorant and a lone juvenile…

Friday, August 28th, 2020

birdingnorthamerica:

Double-crested cormorant and a lone juvenile gull, Franklin ME.

Reposted from https://lies.tumblr.com/post/627764285214490624.

todaysbird: the new yorker gets it

Thursday, August 27th, 2020

todaysbird:

the new yorker gets it

Reposted from https://lies.tumblr.com/post/627638800289529856.

hiimlesphotos:Noisy BirdI saw one of these yesterday too! But my photo was way less impressive.🙂

Saturday, August 15th, 2020

hiimlesphotos:

Noisy Bird

I saw one of these yesterday too! But my photo was way less impressive.🙂

Reposted from https://lies.tumblr.com/post/626540598167535616.

Photo

Sunday, August 9th, 2020

Reposted from https://lies.tumblr.com/post/626022142562254848.

that-crazy-scorpio-man: todaysbird: ahh x … SQUONK!!! Walking home that nightThe sack across my…

Thursday, August 6th, 2020

that-crazy-scorpio-man:

todaysbird:

ahh

x

… SQUONK!!!

Walking home that night

The sack across my back the sound of sobbing on my shoulder

When suddenly it stopped

I opened up the sack, all that I had

A pool of bubbles and tears, just a pool of tears

Just a pool of tears

Reposted from https://lies.tumblr.com/post/625770196389511168.

greetings

Thursday, August 6th, 2020

greetings

Reposted from https://lies.tumblr.com/post/625751647726059520.

falseknees:❤️ Prints available here ❤️

Monday, August 3rd, 2020

falseknees:

❤️ Prints available here ❤️

Reposted from https://lies.tumblr.com/post/625446841319833600.

seagirl49: Soar © Susan Kramer 2017 All Rights Reserved…

Saturday, August 1st, 2020

seagirl49:

Soar

© Susan Kramer 2017 All Rights Reserved

North Central Illinois US

Reposted from https://lies.tumblr.com/post/625259625029238784.

garyachapple: Turkey Vulture  Mono Cliffs Provincial Park, Mono,…

Friday, July 31st, 2020

garyachapple:

Turkey Vulture 

Mono Cliffs Provincial Park, Mono, Ontario, June 16, 2020 

Reposted from https://lies.tumblr.com/post/625187891890585600.

terfery: “You’ve been taking seagull pictures for 15 minutes now, you must have…

Wednesday, July 22nd, 2020

terfery:

“You’ve been taking seagull pictures for 15 minutes now, you must have hundreds. What are you even going to do with them”

– my sister

Anyway the seagulls were flying really close today so have some pictures of seagulls

Reposted from https://lies.tumblr.com/post/624391510498181120.