Archive for February, 2014

nprfreshair: Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson shares some of…

Thursday, February 27th, 2014



nprfreshair:

Astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson shares some of the big questions  astronomers are working to answer:

We can measure the influence of this thing we call dark energy which is forcing an acceleration of the expanding universe. We don’t know what that is, we don’t know anything about it, other than what it’s doing to the universe.

Then 85 percent of the gravity of the universe has a point of origin about which we know nothing. We account for all the matter and energy that we’re familiar with, measure up how much gravity it should have, it’s about one-sixth of the gravity that’s actually operating on the universe. We call that dark matter, but what we should call it is “dark gravity.” We don’t know what that is either.

We don’t know how [Earth] went from inanimate organic molecules to self-replicating life. We got top people working on that as well.

We don’t know what was around before the universe. We don’t know what is at the center of a black hole. We don’t know whether or not the universe is actually one of many in a multiverse. We want to know if there’s life thriving in under ice oceans of Jupiter’s moon Europa.

… But my favorite question is one that we don’t even know to ask yet because it’s a question that would arise upon answering these questions I just delivered to you. … If you’re a scientist and you have to have an answer, even in the absence of data, you’re not going to be a good scientist.

photo via NASA

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orangepenguino: the rawness up close ➝ rami kadi s/s 2013 Is…

Thursday, February 27th, 2014







orangepenguino:

the rawness up close ➝ rami kadi s/s 2013

Is it weird that I kind of want the first one as a wedding dress?

Reposted from http://ift.tt/1hmocWd.

A mathematical model of “Pride and Prejudice”

Thursday, February 27th, 2014

A mathematical model of “Pride and Prejudice”:

I think the number of people who follow me who would find this interesting is greater than zero.

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spacettf: Horsehead / Flame / Fan LHaRGB by pfile on Flickr.

Thursday, February 27th, 2014



spacettf:

Horsehead / Flame / Fan LHaRGB by pfile on Flickr.

Reposted from http://ift.tt/1cW6TcY.

the-north-starr: The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern: Celia…

Thursday, February 27th, 2014



the-north-starr:

The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern: Celia and Marco

I like that I recognized it as siminiblocker‘s work even before I saw her signature.

Reposted from http://ift.tt/1cW6SFV.

slyvester27: yulinkuang: shipwreckedcomedy: yulinkuang: slyve…

Thursday, February 27th, 2014





slyvester27:

yulinkuang:

shipwreckedcomedy:

yulinkuang:

slyvester27:

Look what we did in my English class today.

We watched A Tell Tale Vlog for our Edgar Allen Poe unit!!

WAIT WHAT THIS IS AMAZING. I recognize those giant hardcover anthology books! And those desks! And those teachers’ catalogue-ordered posters on the walls! And and and also, idk, MAYBE THE THING THAT IS BEING PROJECTED ONTO THAT CENTER WHITEBOARD HEY WHAT.

MY HEART IS VERY FULL RIGHT NOW YOU GUYS I CAN’T REALLY EXPLAIN IT. But seriously. When I was in high school, I worked at the local library and I would spend my afternoons shelving returned library books and when I got to the classics section, I’d always be like, “Ha, I know this is because someone had to write a paper on this for class,” and then I’d be like, “What are the odds that I’ll ever write anything someone talks about in a class, probably zero. But whatever, I’m happy writing my Lily/James Harry Potter fanfiction tralalala” and and and – GOD I JUST WISH TIME TRAVEL EXISTED SO I COULD SHOW THIS TO PAST YULIN, I LOVE THIS SO MUCH AND SHE IS PROBABLY THE ONLY OTHER PERSON WHO WOULD APPRECIATE IT AS MUCH AS ME.

… ahem. By which I mean, this is the coolest thing, your teacher is the raddest, and uh hey, what’s next on your syllabus, maybe I can tailor the rest of our upcoming projects to it so this can happen again and I love you guys very much.

As Shipwrecked’s director yulinkuang has said less coherently, this is pretty much the awesomest thing. If you’re ever screening one of our projects in your class, please find a way to document it for us and let us know, because we will pretty much flip out with the excite.

In my excitement I forgot to ask,

slyvester27

, which episode did you guys watch? Was this before or after you guys did the readings? What did the teacher say about it? What did the students say about it? Did anyone fall asleep? If they did, I HOPE THEY FAIL THEIR SATS. Just kidding, you don’t actually have to answer any of these questions. I am just a weirdo who obsessively collects any and all audience reactions to my work, positive and negative, which sometimes backfires horribly but I just can’t seem to stop myself. Also I’ve never been around a live screening of ATTV to an audience of strangers, so I am kinda fascinated.

I don’t mind answering your questions. I love creators who interact with their fans, because when they recognize that I exist I flail for a few minutes and feel like a ‘cool person’  First we watched Edgar’s Draw My Life for a biography/background of his life information. That day we watched episodes 1 and 2, and I think really really hope we watch the rest of them. As far as reaction goes, everyone loved it they laughed at all the jokes, YAY

This is all part of my continuing quest to have my fandoms represented in school.

Pester the teacher mercilessly. Plead. Cajole. Offer to, I don’t know, turn in your homework on time if you get to watch the rest.

Report back with the results.

Thanks.

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awkwardsituationist: aldelie penguins spend their (austral)…

Thursday, February 27th, 2014


justin hofman


maria stenzel


sergey kokinsky


tim laman


david doubilet


sergey kokinsky


ralph lee hopkins


justin hofman


sergey kokinsky

awkwardsituationist:

aldelie penguins spend their (austral) winters in the seas surrounding the antarctic pack ice – about 4,000km from their southern spring breeding grounds – where they fatten on krill. the krill feed on phytoplankton beneath the icebergs, but warming waters due to climate change has reduced their numbers by up to 80 percent as the plankton, which are now unable to access cold water nutrients, are dying off.

adelies are the most southern living penguin, but head north as the summer ends to escape the protracted darkness of the winter. a warming climate, however, has meant a reduced northern icepack, and has seen the encroachment of other penguins onto their southern summer territory who previously found it too cold. the adelie population northeast of the ross sea, for example, has declined by 90 percent.

as one adelie expert put it, these penguins face possible extinction not merely by a loss of habitat, but by an unshakable fear of darkness; adelies need light, if only twilight, to forage and navigate, and as comfort against predators. but as they are pushed further south they may ultimately find themselves trapped behind a curtain of polar night for which they have no hardwired strategy.

photos by (click pic) justin hofman, maria stenzel, david doubilet, tim laman, sergey kokinsky, and ralph lee hopkins

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yulinkuang: slyvester27: Look what we did in my English class…

Thursday, February 27th, 2014





yulinkuang:

slyvester27:

Look what we did in my English class today.

We watched A Tell Tale Vlog for our Edgar Allen Poe unit!!

WAIT WHAT THIS IS AMAZING. I recognize those giant hardcover anthology books! And those desks! And those teachers’ catalogue-ordered posters on the walls! And and and also, idk, MAYBE THE THING THAT IS BEING PROJECTED ONTO THAT CENTER WHITEBOARD HEY WHAT.

MY HEART IS VERY FULL RIGHT NOW YOU GUYS I CAN’T REALLY EXPLAIN IT. But seriously. When I was in high school, I worked at the local library and I would spend my afternoons shelving returned library books and when I got to the classics section, I’d always be like, “Ha, I know this is because someone had to write a paper on this for class,” and then I’d be like, “What are the odds that I’ll ever write anything someone talks about in a class, probably zero. But whatever, I’m happy writing my Lily/James Harry Potter fanfiction tralalala” and and and – GOD I JUST WISH TIME TRAVEL EXISTED SO I COULD SHOW THIS TO PAST YULIN, I LOVE THIS SO MUCH AND SHE IS PROBABLY THE ONLY OTHER PERSON WHO WOULD APPRECIATE IT AS MUCH AS ME.

… ahem. By which I mean, this is the coolest thing, your teacher is the raddest, and uh hey, what’s next on your syllabus, maybe I can tailor the rest of our upcoming projects to it so this can happen again and I love you guys very much.

Heh. It got better.

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aivley: slyvester27: Look what we did in my English class…

Thursday, February 27th, 2014





aivley:

slyvester27:

Look what we did in my English class today.

We watched A Tell Tale Vlog for our Edgar Allen Poe unit!!

YULIN, SEAN, SINEAD YOU NEED TO SEE THIS I AM ALREADY EXCITED FOR YOU!

Oh wow.

My first real job after college was working as a substitute teacher for LA Unified. There are times when I really miss it, even though I stopped teaching 25 years ago.

This is one of those times. Because if I were doing it again, this is so what I’d be doing.

Also, is that kid on the left wearing VR goggles? Oh, wait: headphones, right?

Reposted from http://ift.tt/1kmhgZk.

On fandom, parasocial relationships, and what we don’t know

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014

jenniferlynnbarnes:

Sarah Rees Brennan has a new post up about her experiences (some of them heart-breaking) as a now-published author who used to write fanfiction. It’s well worth a read, especially for the way it highlights the role that gender may play in these issues.

What this post made me think about is the parallel between the way we view and understand fictional characters and the way we view and understand real people that we do not actually know. There’s a long tradition of research in media studies on what they call “parasocial relationships,” which are one-sided relationships formed with (for example) TV personalities, fictional characters, or celebrities. The basic idea is that it’s easy to fool our brains into thinking we know someone. If you see someone a lot—on television, in magazines, or even just on your twitter feed—of course you start to feel like you know that person. In the course of our evolutionary history, if you saw or heard someone that often, you almost certainly did know them.

But that’s not the case in the modern world. And that’s where you get parasocial relationships, which are, by definition, one-sided. Spend enough time reading interviews with Jennifer Lawrence or read enough celebrity gossip about Taylor Swift, and you start to feel like you really know them. It’s one-sided because they do not know you.

Interestingly, social scientists have long-argued that the parasocial relationships we have with real people we do not actually know operate very similarly to the relationships we have with fictional characters. And both of the above parallel our actual two-sided, real-world relationships in a variety of interesting ways. For example, seeing a picture of a favorite fictional character can have what they call “social facilitation effects,” which we would normally see if you were in the presence of a friend. Being primed with your favorite celebrity (and/or character) increase self esteem and can make you feel a sense of belonging. When a favorite show is cancelled, the resulting emotional distress can look a lot like a break-up.

Long story short, there is a ton of super interesting research that documents a tendency to view fictional characters and real people we don’t know (like celebrities) much like we view real people who we actually know. This can be wonderful! Oh, the fictional friends I have made! But this tendency also has the potential to come with a variety of side-effects, because while fiction is often purposefully written to make certain we know tons of stuff about the personalities, backgrounds, inner workings, flaws, strengths, moral status, and emotional cores of the characters on the page, this is not true of parasocial interactions with real people. When your brain tricks you into thinking that you really know a fictional character, there are many ways in which that is true. But when real people are involved?

It’s not true. It’s not true at all.

In my day job, I study the science of fiction and why we like stories and what the cognitive effects of engaging with fictional characters and fictional worlds might be. In this field, we’re starting to see evidence that reading fiction might improve (or otherwise be related to) the ability to get inside other people’s heads: to read their emotions, and understand what they think and believe so forth. People like Lisa Zunshine and Raymond Mar and Keith Oatley have all kinds of wonderful papers (and books!) on this relationship between spending time with fictional characters and being able to read real people.

How does this work? It’s early days, still, so we don’t really know. But what does seem to be true is that fiction often gives us a front row seat to people’s emotions and relationships and thoughts and beliefs and desires in a way that reality usually does not. In the real world, you might infer, based on the fact that someone bolts in the middle of their father’s funeral, that they are upset or overwhelmed. You might even feel like you know that. But in fiction, you often do know it—you see the before and the after and the moment when the character lets him/herself break down because there is no one there to see it.

But in reality? We don’t have this kind of access. In life, there is no author or director making sure we have the information we need to have in order to understand the “characters.” As a result, in the real world, we only perceive ourselves as knowing what other people are thinking and feeling. We make inferences based on behavioral cues, but we have no direct access to their minds. Oftentimes, we can guess and guess well, but it’s always that… a guess.

What does all of this have to do with Sarah’s post?

I think that a lot of the negative experiences that Sarah talks about female authors (specifically those who used to write fanfic) having are the result of people feeling like they know things that they could not possibly know. Like what an author was thinking when they wrote XYZ character, or what the author’s intention was when they did/said that one thing, or why Author X is friends with Author Y.

In fiction, you frequently (though not always) have the access you need to make conclusions about characters’ mental states and motivations with a high level of certainty. Most of the time in reality, you do not—especially if the people you’re attributing mental states and intentions and dispositions to are people you do not actually know, people you are watching from afar.

Reading Sarah’s post made me wonder if those of us who engage with fiction frequently and passionately and, yes, through fandom, writing stories and daydreaming about characters and diagnosing their motivations—I wonder if that level of engagement could potentially have very real cognitive effects on us, beyond what has already been studied. On the one hand, that kind of engagement might actually make us better at understanding people. But at the same time, I think it quite possibly increases our perceptions of how good we are at doing that, beyond what is actually possible. Regular engagement with fiction—particularly active engagement through fandom—might fool us into thinking, even more than people who are less engaged with fiction, that we really, truly know what other people are thinking or intending and who they are deep down.

Might we get into the habit of telling ourselves stories about real people’s motivations, the same way that fandom thinks about and expands on the inner lives of the characters in the books and television shows we love? And might this trick us, in real-world settings, into forgetting that these stories, in our minds, about these people who are REAL—are not real themselves?

The stories we tell ourselves are just that—stories. They are, at best, guesses, and often, they’re not very good ones. We do not have special access to another person’s thoughts or emotions, no matter how much we’ve read about them. We do not “really know” them better than the people they are close to in real life. It is not in any way rational to think that, based on your familiarity with someone’s writing or twitter feed or something you were peripherally involved with ten years ago, you have superior knowledge of that person’s current mental states, emotions, personality, and moral proclivities than do people who currently hang out with that person on a daily basis.

And yet, this happens. It happens all the time. We judge people not just on their actions, but on the stories we tell ourselves about those actions, not just on their work, but on the stories we tell ourselves about how we think that work came to be. And there are very real reasons to think that the people who might be most prone to this feeling—that we really know someone, that we understand their intentions and emotions and motivations and inspirations—are those of us who spend the most time in fictional worlds, with fictional characters, telling ourselves stories about them.

This is what I was thinking when I read Sarah’s blog entry. I was thinking about parasocial relationships and the way we perceive mental states and how fiction can fool you into thinking those perceptions are more than guesses. I was thinking about the way that gender almost certainly plays a role in what those guesses end up being. And I was thinking that it would probably do a world of good if we made more of an active effort to remind ourselves of all the things we don’t know.

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best socially awkward guy (with tweets) · LBDCareCenter

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014

best socially awkward guy (with tweets) · LBDCareCenter:

shipwreckedcomedy:

thelirivera:

sara-wrote-this:

This is awesome. Poe wins by a landslide.

The best part of this is the tweets from Shipwrecked!Poe.

Thanks to thelbdcarecenter for voting Socially Awkward Poe the Best Socially Awkward Guy! We passed the news on to Edgar and he muttered, “Oh, well that seems… appropriate.” Then he shut the doors and drew the blinds, we assume because he was so overcome with emotion.

Hope everyone’s excited for the start of Kissing in the Rain and our Tumblr transmedia experiment on March 10th! In the meantime, give A Tell Tale Vlog a rewatch!

Much love,

Shipwrecked

ATTV really does hold up well to rewatching. And it’s so short that you can get the whole thing in in a single sitting. I love seeing my favorite moments roll around. Like pretty much all of episode 6.

It’s not you. It’s just that I hate being near you, and everything about you, and the things that you do.

I am haunted by many women. Many women…

So good.

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fvfarm: lauren: Antarctica on the M/S Expedition Some of…

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014

















fvfarm:

lauren:

Antarctica on the M/S Expedition

Some of Lauren’s latest photos,certainly very good

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“Lies” (acoustic version) – Marina and the Diamonds, Electra…

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014



“Lies” (acoustic version) – Marina and the Diamonds, Electra Heart (2012)

Songs called “Lies”, 3rd in a series

Fun fact: One of the first ‘lies’ Tumblr URL suitors to respond in detail when I asked why she wanted it told me it was because she loved this song. It is a measure of how out-of-touch I am that I had never heard of Marina and the Diamonds before that.

Lyrics:

You’re never gonna love me, so what’s the use?
What’s the point in playing a game you’re gonna lose?
What’s the point in saying you love me like a friend?
What’s the point in saying it’s never gonna end?

You’re too proud to say that you’ve made a mistake
You’re a coward to the end
I don’t wanna admit that we’re not gonna fit
No, I’m not the type that you like
Why don’t we just pretend?

Lies, don’t wanna know, don’t wanna know oh
I can’t let you go, can’t let you go oh
I just want it to be perfect
To believe it’s all been worth the fight
Lies, don’t wanna know, don’t wanna know oh

You only ever touch me in the dark
Only if we’re drinking can you see my spark
And only in the evening could you give yourself to me
Cause the night is your woman, and she’ll set you free

You’re too proud to say that you’ve made a mistake
You’re a coward to the end
I don’t wanna admit that we’re not gonna fit
No, I’m not the type that you like
Why don’t we just pretend?

Lies, don’t wanna know, don’t wanna know oh
I can’t let you go, can’t let you go oh
I just want it to be perfect
To believe it’s all been worth the fight
Lies, don’t wanna know, don’t wanna know oh

Lies, don’t wanna know, don’t wanna know oh
I can’t let you go, can’t let you go oh
I just want it to be perfect
To believe it’s all been worth the fight
Lies, don’t wanna know, don’t wanna know oh

Reposted from http://ift.tt/1hj5Vcg.

allthingseurope:  Dunnottar Castle, Scotland (by been…

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014



allthingseurope:

 Dunnottar Castle, Scotland (by been snapping)

Reposted from http://ift.tt/1jBWp4k.

svyalitchat: geneeste: jenndoesnotcare: svyalitchat: An…

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014



svyalitchat:

geneeste:

jenndoesnotcare:

svyalitchat:

An Example of the the Power And Importance of SV in YA Lit

Last week, I Tweeted about an incident that happened surrounding the book Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell.  Rainbow Rowell had been disinvited to a school after parents complained about the content in her book, Eleanor and Park.  I compiled those tweets into a post which you can read here.  In response to the situation, a reader reached out to me and asked that I please share the following anonymously.  Here it is in its entirity.  Warning, there are triggers as it discusses abuse.

By the time I was in the 8th grade, my parents were divorced.  One year I lived with my mom and the next I lived with my dad.  My mom had moved out of state and there I was, a young barely teenage girl living with my dad.  It began slowly, so slowly I almost didn’t know anything was happening.

First, the shower curtain was replaced with a clear shower curtain.  My dad always seemed to need to brush his teeth while I was showering.  So I began locking the door.  Soon, the bathroom door lock was broken.  So I began pulling out the drawers in the bathroom sink so he couldn’t open the door.  He would stand outside the door banging and yelling, “You open this fucking door right now.”  Soon I stopped showering.

Swimming had always been one of my favorite things to do.  But he took that too.  Often, when we would go swimming, he would grab the front of my bathing suit and pull it down.  It didn’t matter who was around.  I would pretend I had homework.  I would pretend I was sick.  I would do anything to get out of going swimming.  That too was often a fight.

The next year it was time once again to live with my mother.  That year was a breath of fresh air.  No one watched me shower.  No one watched me dress.  But as Christmas slowly approached, so did the fear of what would happen when I had to go visit my dad.  So one day, I went and talked to the school counselor.  You see, I wasn’t sure if what I thought was happening that year really was happening.  It felt wrong, it terrified me, but nobody talks about those types of things.  I knew it wasn’t rape, but what was it?  So I went to the school counselor thinking she would tell me that everything that had happened was misconstrued and I would know that I was wrong.

After I told her my story, she sat back in her chair and said, “I’m sorry.  I am legally required to call the police now.  I promise you, this is going to be okay.  You don’t have to go back there.”  And I didn’t, I never went back.  And I was so glad because someone had told me what I needed to know and helped me.  They had finally helped me give voice to the fear inside me and affirmed that I was right to think what was happening was abuse.

I couldn’t help but think of my own story when I read Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell.  There is no bathroom door at Eleanor’s house, and like me, she is forced to find ways to take showers – or not to take them as the case may be – when her stepdad is not around.  As I read her story I knew exactly what she was feeling, and I wished this story had been there for me when I was a teen.  I wished that someone had told me that abuse can be many things.  But I was glad to hear that someone was giving my story a voice and telling teens today – you shouldn’t have to live like this, it is not okay.

When I read Eleanor and Park, I cried.  I cried because no one should have to go through the things that Eleanor goes through.  I cried because I knew every moment of fear and despair and doubt that she felt.  I cried because someone was finally telling my story.  If we say that teens can’t or shouldn’t be reading Eleanor and Park, we are saying that they shouldn’t be reading my story – that I should keep quiet and be ashamed, even though I did nothing wrong.  Even though that very quiet and shame is what allowed this to happen to me, because I wasn’t quite sure if it was abuse or not.  Imagine what a difference this book would have made.

Source: http://ift.tt/1cRVNpv

When my best friend read this she said “I was with Eleanor, tiptoeing, waiting for it to get bad” and I just thought, fuck. I needed this book to be a better friend.

Okay, so I need to talk about something here, because this brings up a major (and really only) problem that I had with Eleanor & Park. Before I begin, I want to make something really clear: I love this book. I love the main characters, and I think it’s an important book for a number of reasons.

The bit that bothers me, and why I haven’t talked about the book until now, is that Eleanor doesn’t go to the counselor. And I can understand that – she is a teenager and really vulnerable. But the fact is, several adults who seemed to have had an idea that abuse was occurring, and one adult who SPECIFICALLY knew that abuse was occurring and would probably escalate, chose not to call in authorities who could help. 

Not one able adult called Child Protective Services, the Police, a counselor – none. It’s not even clear that Eleanor’s Uncle and Aunt did (in fact, given that the town gossip doesn’t mention it, I assume they didn’t). And that really, really bothers me. It’s possible that they could have called and nothing would have happened, that’s true. But not one adult – and these were written as otherwise self-aware and proactive and responsible characters – even tried to do this, which just does not sit well with me.

In the end, I feel like all of the adults in Eleanor’s life failed her, for no particular reason other than no one thought to pick up a phone or talk to an expert on the subject. There’s nothing in the book that addresses this oversight, or makes it understandable to me. And that’s a thing that worries me: because, yes, it’s made clear that Eleanor’s situation, that the behavior of her stepfather is very, very wrong, but it also doesn’t do much of anything to show the reader how adults can help right this wrong.

And if the book had commented on the fact that adults sometimes – maybe quite often – fail to help teens in dire situations, I might be able to look past it. Instead, it doesn’t even address it. I know as an adult – one who as a teen had an unrelated adult intercede on my behalf to prevent the threatened abuse of a parent – I know exactly what I would have done, which was called the authorities. It may not have helped, but I would have at the very least tried, and I don’t know another responsible adult who wouldn’t.

I don’t know. I’m sure the author had a reason for this (I can’t fathom that she didn’t, since the rest of book is so well written and conceived). Having said that, I’m not worried that kids are going to get the wrong message from Eleanor and Park’s relationship or Eleanor’s very disturbing situation with her stepfather. I’m worried they’re going to get the wrong message from how she was rescued from it. 

I’m afraid kids are going to get the message that if they don’t have family to run to, their only option is to run away period, and that is no improvement on their vulnerability. I’m worried that they are going to think that they are on their own, that no adult has the tools or the willingness to help them.


I have seen this before in YA lit, where kids don’t tell a counselor or adult
and I think this can be a very real life scenario because the fear of the unknown can still be more overwhelming than what is known, even if it is living in pure hell.  For example, you see a very abusive (not sexual) situation in Rotters by Daniel Kraus where the teen doesn’t ask for help from counselors, and he definitely has an opportunity to do so.  I also think that for many teens there are confusing and conflicting feelings because it is home and it is family and it is all they have or know.  I have to go back and read it, it has been a while, but wasn’t Eleanor even gone from the home for a while before the time of the book?

I also think it raises some interesting questions about the dynamics of abuse and grooming.  For Elanor’s mom, it is an abusive situation that she doesn’t know how to get out of – as many woman don’t (they will leave on average I believe 7 times before they leave for good and leaving can actually be the most deadly time of the relationship according to reports) – and there are a lot of lives tied up into this one situation, further complicating the scenario emotionally for Eleanor.

And then, with the grooming, it tends to be a slow and insidious development where you don’t always know exactly what is going on at first, which is the point. And unfortunately, I know that far too many people – adults – are slow to help and intervene because it is hard to believe these things happen and we want to live in denial.  Which is part of the reason why these books are in fact so important, because they help draw back that curtain and make it easier for us to see and, hopefully, do something.

I think in the end, we have to remember that this is one book – one story. And while they do raise interesting questions and can create meaningful dialogue, they aren’t meant to be a guidebook to life.  For some readers that may be the takeaway – she should have gone to an adult for help.  For others it is just understanding that abuse can be many things – it’s not always rape.

But it is also okay that this book didn’t work for you. That’s a legitimate response as well.

Reposted from http://ift.tt/1kjR8y2.

“You left… without saying goodbye…”

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014










“You left… without saying goodbye…”

Reposted from http://ift.tt/1kjRapO.

becausebirds: Allen’s Humming Bird because…birds! Haha. Okay,…

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014



becausebirds:

Allen’s Humming Bird

because…birds!

Haha. Okay, see, the picture is funny because the Allen’s Hummingbird is super similar to the Rufous Hummingbird. But one of the few reliable ways to tell them apart is that the Rufous has a distinct notch in the outer edge of the not-the-middle-but-next-to-the-middle pair of tail feathers. It’s normally considered a really iffy field mark, though, unless you’re banding and actually have the bird in your hand, because it’s so hard to see.

But in this case, yeah, Allen’s all the way.

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superpotterwholockedonfire-lotr: things that make me happy:…

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014













superpotterwholockedonfire-lotr:

things that make me happy: summer rain

Closer…

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becausebirds: emuwren: The Splendid Fairy-wren – Malurus…

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014





becausebirds:

emuwren:

The Splendid Fairy-wren – Malurus splendens, are widely distributed across Australia in two areas. These birds live in arid to semi-arid areas, in mostly dense shrublands or woodlands of acacia, and mallee eucalypt with dense shrub.

Photo’s by Birds in Backyards and Simon Bennett.

because…birds!

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rachelkiley: marykatewiles: The Lizzie Bennet Episode 87 – An…

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014



rachelkiley:

marykatewiles:

The Lizzie Bennet Episode 87 – An Understanding

So, this came out a year ago today. 

That morning, Rachel and Ashley and I all went and got brunch together. I’m pretty sure I didn’t sleep much the night before. We put our phones in the middle of the table and we all just kind of sat there, nervously, impatiently, twitching. 

It was a weird thing, that whole experience, in the way of being able to immediately see so many responses to our work. It was certainly new to me (and to all of us) and I don’t think I’ll likely be in something that works that way again soon. It was incredibly exciting and also nerve-wracking, and quite frankly, terrifying. 

But I learned so much from it. I learned to not count on applause and admiration and to not let those things determine my own definitions of my work. I learned to be proud of the work I did and the story I was telling, even if it didn’t please everybody, and that being able to tell a story that meant something to some people, even one person, was worth more to me (and continues to be) than money, or fame, or awards, or whatever. 

I hope this episode meant something to you. I hope Lydia’s story meant something to you. At the end of the day, i am very lucky to have been able to tell it and it became more than I ever realized or imagined, and I wouldn’t trade that for being the lead on a tv show or a more illustrious career or any of those things. This episode, and this story, was important to me, and challenging, and demanded my whole, and I am lucky that I’ve had a chance to do that kind of work. It is still more a part of my life now, a year later, than I ever imagined. And I’m okay with that. In fact, I’m quite proud of that. 

I’m very thankful to have been able to go on this journey with the people that I did, with Rachel, and Ashley, and the others, and I’m very thankful for those of you who went on it with us. I’m not very good at imagining lives for my characters outside of the context of the story, but I can imagine that where ever Lydia is, she’s probably somewhat like me, in that she’s not exactly where she wants to be, but she’s getting there, and she’s learning to love herself and those around her more every day, and growing in confidence, and courageousness, and kindness, and love. She’s living. She’s alive in our thoughts and our hearts and our minds, and even without her this past year, she is still very close to me. 

I love her, and I love her story, and I love you. 

What MK said. Minus the part about loving you, because lbr I don’t know you. Wait, and the part about a TV job. I’d probably go for the TV job. I like being able to pay for stuff. But the rest of it is fine.

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