“It was, arguably, a love of war that created No Man’s Land. The advent of automatic weaponry created…”

It was, arguably, a love of war that created No Man’s Land. The advent of automatic weaponry created a space across warzone fronts since World War I that was decimated by artillery, bombs, and scattered with corpses from either side. It was un-winnable space, an area from which there was no escape, and no advancement either way.

Thankfully, Diana of Themyscira is no man. And in one of the most iconic and emotional scenes in the film—one, of course, the studio didn’t believe in but director Patty Jenkins, thankfully, fought for—Diana learns what it is to be Wonder Woman. Try as one might (and trust, I have) it is hard to explain the depths and layers of importance of that moment without speaking to it on a personal level. I’ve gone on a journey with the Wonder Woman film, and I’m not too proud to admit it. Diana’s journey was a layered one, an origin story filled with lessons she needed to learn.

And, as it turned out, there were a few lessons I needed to learn, too.

Alicia Lutes, How Wonder Woman’s No Man’s Land Tells a Radical Story About Trust

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