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Observations of objects of type "Other":

Other (Other)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Time: Fri May 30 01:15:00 2003 UT   Obs. no.: 816

Tonight, the coronal mass ejection from the sun delivered a very nice northern lights display for about 20 minutes. There was one streamer that had both red and greens in it. It lasted about five minutes before it faded. A second sreamer formed and it lasted about a minute. This streamer was red. During the height of the aurora, the scattered clouds had a pink glow on them. Also, low in the northern horizon, there were pulses of white light flashing like lightning.

Other (Other, est. mag ~14, est. to be in Sextans, Est. RaDec 10h14m, +3d28')
Observer: Dave Mitsky (e-mail: djm28@psu.edu)
Instrument: 17-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Lewisberry, PA, USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Tue Apr 1 06:15:00 2003 UT   Obs. no.: 798

Despite the weather forecasts a clear night materialized on Monday and my goal of viewing this recent supernova was realized. Here's a slightly modified version of the observing log that I sent to netastrocatalog this morning.Observer: Dave MitskyYour skills: Advanced (many years)Date/time of observation: 2003/4/1 6:15 UTLocation of site: ASH Naylor Observatory (40.1 degrees N, 76.9 degrees W, Elevation 190 meters)Site classification: ExurbanSky darkness: ~5.0 <Limiting magnitude>Seeing: 6 <1-10 Seeing Scale (10 best)>Moon presence: None - moon not in skyInstrument: 17" f/15 classical Cassegrain equatorial mountMagnifications: 162, 202, and 259xFilter(s): NoneObject(s): SN 2003cg, NGC 3169, NGC 3166Category: Extragalactic starClass: Subluminous type Ia supernovaConstellation: SextansMagnitude: ~14.0 Position: 10h14m, +03d28'Description:This recently discovered type Ia supernova was visible with averted vision. Its parent galaxy NGC 3169 and nearby NGC 3166, both Herschel 400 spiral galaxies, were easily seen. SN 2003cg was located within the glow of NGC 3169 - see http://messier45.com/cgi-bin/h400/i.cgi?n=3169&d=GX - making a sighting somewhat difficult. The supernova is situated 14" east and5" north of NGC 3169's nucleus. An 11.3 magnitude field star lies almost due east. For more on this object, including images, see http://www.rochesterastronomy.org/snimages/

Other (Other)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: fair
Time: Sun Mar 23 04:30:00 2003 UT   Obs. no.: 789

This evening, I attached my Star Spectroscope to my six inch dob so I could observe the stars Arcturus and Spica. In my dob, Spica has a bluish tinge to it while Spica is bright yellow in my dob. This shows that Spica is the hotter of both stars. However, My Star Spectroscope shows Spica to be very much hotter than Arcturus. With Arcturus, I can easily see its hydrogen line. I can't see any spectral lines in Spica. This means Spica is an extremely hot star. The hotter a star, the harder it is to see spectral lines in the star. The spectroscope thus shows that Spica is very much hotter than Arcturus.

Other (Other)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: fair
Time: Thu Dec 19 00:30:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 736

This evening, I decided to attatch my Star septroscope to my dob so I could observe the star Aldebaran. In my scope, Aldebaran has a yellow orange tint to it indicating it to be a fairly cool star. However, in the spetroscope, Aldebaran shows five spectral lines, meaning it is very cool. The more spectral lines a star shows, the cooler the star is. Two of the lines appear to be hydrogen lines. The remaining three lines appeared to be one sodium, one magnesium and possibly one iron line. What this all shows is Aldebaran getting pretty close to the end of its life. I also observed Saturn and Jupiter. With Saturn so close now, I was able to make out two or possibly three belts on its southern hemisphere. I also was able to see the Encke division on both the right and left sides of its rings. Jupiter had festoons on its North equitorial belt. Also, two of its moons were so close together, they looked like a close double star.

Other (Other)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: light   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Wed Dec 4 05:30:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 730

After I finished viewing Jupiter and Saturn, I attached my star spectroscope to my 6" dob so I could observe the stars Sirius and Procyon. In my scope,Sirius is a white star and Procyon is a yellow star, which means Sirius is the hotter of the two stars. In the spectroscope, Sirius shows a bright hydrogen band and a bright molecular band. Procyun only shows a hydrogen band. This shows that both of our near neighbors are happily gliding along in the main sequence of their lives.

Other (Other)
Observer: Dave Mitsky (e-mail: djm28@psu.edu)
Instrument: 42-mm binoculars   Location: Harrisburg , PA, USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: good
Time: Tue Dec 3 23:08:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 732

On a bitterly cold Tuesday evening I watched the passes of the STS-113 and the ISS from a baseball field near my residence and was richly rewarded for my, ahem, endeavor. The Space Shuttle appeared first in the northwest sometime after 23:08 UT and raced across the sky towards the bowl of the Little Dipper. The ISS was 41 seconds behind the Endeavor, which entered the earth's shadow in the north and disappeared at 23:12 UT. During the event I followed both spacecraft with my unaided eyes and a Celestron Noble 8x42 binocular. Two much dimmer objects crossed the sky in opposite directions a few minutes later. I believe they were Cosmos 1908, which traveled from the north to the south southeast, and Cosmos 1703, which tracked from the south southeast to the north northeast. They passed by each other at approximately 23:18 UT.While I was enjoying the great outdoors, I also turned my binocular gaze towards M45, Melotte 20, M31, M33, M15, M34, M103, Albireo, Omicron Cygni, and finally a zenith hugging M39.The sky was rather transparent. I was pleasantly suprised to be able to detect M33, however dimly, despite the ever increasing light pollution in the area.

Other (Other)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Time: Thu Nov 28 04:00:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 726

After our snowstorm ended, I collected and then melted the snow so I could run a strong magnet in the water to collect meteor dust. Since this storm happened about 9 days after the Leonid shower, I wanted to see what the dust looked like in a 100x microscope. At 100x, the dust had a fuzzy and linty look about it. The colors of each speck were a combination of black, yellow and orange.This compares to other times when the dust looks like black mini rocks. This sample was about 60% black particles and about 40% fuzzy black, yellow and orange particles. Usually the ratio is 90% to 10%.

Other (Other)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Sat Nov 9 04:45:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 716

Last night, I attatched my star spectroscope to my 6" dob so I could study two stars, Betelgeuse and Rigel. Betelgeuse's yellow orange color shows it to be a cool star, but the star spectroscpe shows how really cool the star is. I was able to see six absorbtion lines through the spectroscope. Two of the lines were hydrogen lines and there was one line each of magnesium,sodium and iron. I also saw an oxigen line but I think it was from our own planets atmosphere. The fact that six lines could be seen shows how cool Betelgeuse is and how near the end of its life Betelgeuse is. I then turned to Rigel. This stars bluish tinge shows Rigel to be a hot star, but once again the star spetroscope shows how really hot rigel is. The spectroscope showed no absorbtion lines at all. This shows that Rigel is so hot, that absorbtion lines are impossible to detect in my spectroscope. This shows that Betelgeuse and Rigel really are at the opposite ends of the spectrom.

Other (Other, est. mag 13.5p, est. to be in Pisces, Est. RaDec 1h16.4m, +33d27')
Observer: Dave Mitsky (e-mail: djm28@psu.edu)
Instrument: 14.5-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Tuscarora State Forest near Mifflintown , PA, USA
Light pollution: light   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Tue Oct 8 06:30:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 694

One of the many deep-sky objects that Tony Donnangelo and I observed while at this remote dark sky site was the dwarf spheroidal galaxy Andromeda II. Through Tony's Starmaster at 83 (22mm Tele Vue Nagler type 4) and 107x (17mm Tele Vue Nagler type 4) this member of the Local Group was small, round, and rather dim.

Other (Other)
Observer: Dave Mitsky (e-mail: djm28@psu.edu)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: Cherry Springs State Park, PA, USA
Light pollution: none   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: good
Time: Sun Sep 8 01:45:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 682

The 2002 Black Forest Star Party at Cherry Springs State Park (seehttp://members.aol.com/CherrySpSP/ andhttp://www.bfsp.org/starparty/about.cfm) in Potter County,Pennsylvania, was one of the very best of the many star parties I'veattended over the years, rivalling the 1995 Winter Star Party in manyways. I made the slightly more than three hour drive to the park onWednesday and stayed until Monday afternoon. Each night was clear although the transparency was a bit better in the latter nights while good seeing prevailed earlier.There were so many highlights that I don't have time to list them allat the moment but I will mention a few. Without a doubt themagnificent auroral display on Saturday night was the clear winner. As seen from the dark skies of CSSP the aurora was the brightest andmost lively that I've ever witnessed, although the red hues that werevisible were not as vivid as those of the April 2000 display. The shimmering curtains and blazing rays that resembled searchlights sweeping the sky painted a most compelling picture. The aurora borealis first appeared as an arclike band in the northern sky sometime after sunset. By 01:45 UT the display began in earnest and motion became apparent as curtains formed. Suddenly extremely bright rays erupted, reaching almost to the zenith and spreading westward and to a lesser degree eastward. There were occasional isolated patches in the east. The aurora almost merged with the Milky Way at times. Activity eventually diminished but there was a constant glow in the northern sky. Around 5:30 UT a second but lesser wave of activity commenced. Digicam images of the aurora from CSSP regulars Gary Honis and Nick Zeller can be seen at http://freepages.science.rootsweb.com/~astro/090702.htm and http://users.adelphia.net/~nzallar/ (CSSP Reports). Images from around the world are available at http://science.nasa.gov/spaceweather/aurora/gallery_07sep02.html.I caught a glimpse of the gravitationally lensed quasar known asEinstein's Cross thanks to Dave Barrett's vast deep-sky knowledge andhis 24" Tectron.Uranus was a relatively easy naked-eye target. I viewed it each andevery night and showed it to many other observers. I also added twomore naked-eye Messier objects to my list - M33 (finally!) and M35.I thoroughly enjoyed seeing the Horsehead Nebula (B33) through fellowDVAA member Scott Ewart's 13.1" Coulter on Sunday morning. This wasthe smallest aperture through which I've logged B33. In all, I saw B33through Scott's scope, fellow ASH member Tony Donnangelo's brand new14.5" Starmaster, Frank Bov's award winning 20" ATM Dob, the 20"Starmaster belonging to Gary Honis (with and without a H-beta filter,believe it or not), and Dave Barrett's 24" Tectron.On Sunday morning the Merope Nebula in M45 was clearly visible througha number of different instruments and M42 displayed colors ofblue-white, green, brown, and muted pinks through several of thelarger Dobs.In closing, I must add that the views of the sun through DVAA memberJim Sweeney's binoviewer equipped 7.1" Astro-Physics Starfire and his new 0.2 Angstrom ASO Solar Spectrum H-alpha filter were simply unbelievable. Prominences near the limb took on a three dimensional appearance and filaments were displayed far better than I've ever experienced. A report on the BFSP which includes photographs is posted at http://www.wasociety.org/BFSP2002.htm.

Other (Other, est. mag 15+, est. to be in Pegasus, Est. RaDec 23h28.5m,+22d25')
Observer: Dave Mitsky (e-mail: djm28@psu.edu)
Instrument: 18-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Cherry Springs State Park, Potter County, PA, USA
Light pollution: none   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Fri Jul 12 03:00:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 661

One of the more interesting objects that I observed under the very dark skies of Cherry Springs State Park last Thursday night was a recent type 1a supernova in NGC 7678, a 12.2 magnitude SAB(rs)c I-IIgalaxy located in Pegasus. With a magnitude of 15.1 to 15.5 SN2002dp was by far the dimmest exploding star that I have ever viewed. I could discern the supernova about 1/3 of the time with averted vision through an 18" Starmaster at high magnification. For a recent image of SN 2002dp see http://www.RochesterAstronomy.org/sn2002/n7678s3.jpg

Other (Other, est. mag 15+, est. to be in Pegasus, Est. RaDec 23h28.5m,+22d25')
Observer: Dave Mitsky (e-mail: djm28@psu.edu)
Instrument: 18-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Cherry Springs State Park, Potter County, PA, USA
Light pollution: none   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Fri Jul 12 00:00:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 660

One of the more interesting objects that I observed under the very dark skies of Cherry Springs State Park last Thursday night was a recent type 1a supernova in NGC 7678, a 12.2 magnitude SAB(rs)c I-IIgalaxy located in Pegasus. With a magnitude of 15.1 to 15.5 SN2002dp was by far the dimmest exploding star that I have ever viewed. I could discern the supernova about 1/3 of the time with averted vision through an 18" Starmaster at high magnification. For a recent image of SN 2002dp see http://www.RochesterAstronomy.org/sn2002/n7678s3.jpg

Other (Other, est. mag 5, est. to be in Ophiuchus)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Wed May 22 04:30:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 649

Rho Ophiuchi is a triple star very close to Anteres. At 48x the main componant star has a blue white tinge to it. One of its fainter componants seems to be a bluish colored star. The other fainter componant appears to be yellow. The triple star can even be split in 10x50 binaculars, with a little difficulty. To find this star in binaculars, simply put Anteres at the bottom of the field and Rho Ophiuchi will be just above the middle of the field.

Other (Other)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: light   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Sun May 12 03:30:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 646

Last night, my brother and I Viewed a nice red and green aurora between 11:30 and 11:50 pm edt.At first, the reds were all around us and continually shifting to diferent parts of the sky. The increasing high cirrus clouds were made to look Quite red during the display.after about 10 minutes the reds started to fade, but on the horizon the dark green color took over. The display ended very quickly and we were back home by midnight.

Other (Other)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Thu Apr 25 05:25:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 642

Nu scorpii is a wider double in Scorpio.The pimaray brighter componant is almost white with maybe a hint of yellow in it and the dimmer componant looks grey to me. Omega scorpii is a wide binacular double. the stars seem to be of equal brightness. there may be a hint of blue in them.

Other (Other, est. mag 2.5)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Thu Apr 25 05:20:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 641

Beta scopii in Scorpio is a close binary systom. the primary star is white and several times as bright as its companion. The dimmer star had a dull greyish color to it.

Other (Other, est. mag 1.8)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Thu Apr 25 05:10:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 640

Delta scorpii in scorpio flared up more than a year ago.Last year when it brightened, i examined it with my star spectroscope attached to my 6" dob. I was able to see a hydrogen line Quite easily in the spectroscope back then. the star has now brightened to 1.8 mag. so I examined it again. This time the hydrogen line was almost impossible to see. This means the stars temperature must be increasing at the same time that the star is brightening.

Other (Other, est. mag 4.2, est. to be in Ophiuchus)
Observer: Jaakko Saloranta (e-mail: j_saloranta@hotmail.com, web: http://fda.iwarp.com)
Instrument: 8-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Santahamina, Helsinki (Military Area), Finland
Light pollution: light   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: good
Time: Thu Apr 4 03:11:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 696

(Hopefully the mistake is mine, but can't I add nothing more than NGC and M-objects here? Fix it or fix me, please!)IC 4665A pretty easy catch to the naked eye. Faint large glow, with at least 2 stars visible (magnitudes, 6.85 and 7.14). With keen adverted vsion a couple more stars could be spotted.

Other (Other)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: binoculars   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: none   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Sun Mar 17 03:05:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 634

the coma star cluster was easy to see from the northwest hills of Connecticut with the naked eye.It appeared as a wispy patch in the sky. With 10x50 binoculars, the loose widely spaced cluster seemed to have only white stars.Some astronomy books say the cluster also has blue white stars, but to me the stars were just plain white.

Other (Other)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 20-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: none   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Sun Mar 17 03:00:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 632

The highlight of my trip to the northwest hills of Connecticut, was my first time ever view of the flame nebula in orion in a 20" dob. The nebula looked like a very faint flame. The shape of the flame nebula was fairly obvious even though the object was difficult to see.

Other (Other)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Fri Mar 1 00:00:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 612

I observered Mintaka in Orion's belt. It is a binary whos main componant is bluish white. Its faint companion is some distance away and it has a bluish tinge to it. All the belt stars including Mintaka have a considerable amount of nebulacity around them.

Other (Other)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Time: Sun Jan 20 21:00:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 605

Last night I allowed falling snow to land in a large plastic container. After the snow melted, I passed a stron magnet through the water.I then used a clear peice of tape to remove the tiny meteor dust partcles I then placed the tape on a small white carboard piece and viewed the sample under my 100x microscope. All the particles were jet black. They also differed in size and shape. Michael Amato

Other (Other)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Thu Jan 17 23:00:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 604

The hyades open cluster is widely spaced as compared to the pleiades. The stars in the hyades are mostly yellow. Michael Amato

Other (Other)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: good
Time: Mon Jan 14 03:00:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 603

i observed the Pleiades also known as m 45. The stars were blue. When I put my telescope on the bighter stars, I was able to see nebulousity around them. Michael Amato

Other (Other, est. mag ~9th, est. to be in Perseus, Est. RaDec 4h12m, +47d09')
Observer: Dave Mitsky (e-mail: djm28@psu.edu)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: Lewisberry, PA, USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: poor
Time: Wed Nov 7 03:05:00 2001 UT   Obs. no.: 590

I spent a couple of hours at the Astronomical Society of Harrisburg's Naylor Observatory (http://www.astrohbg.org) on Tuesday night. I didn't see any auroral activity but I did catch glimpses of a few interesting solar system denizens and some deep-sky fare as well. Using the 17" f/15 classical Cassegrain housed in the French Dome I warmed up by viewing two autumn Messier galaxies, M77 and M74 (widely considered to be the most difficult Messier object) at 162x. Then I tracked down asteroid 4 Vesta (162x), which was located to the southeast of Aldebaran (p.179, Uranometria 2000.0 Volume I). The minor planet formed a double triangle with what appeared to be eighth and ninth magnitude field stars. Another shallow-sky object came next, the so-called (and over-hyped) Christmas Comet, C/2000 WM1 (LINEAR). Like many comets this one may be a disappointment. It's brightness appears to be lagging behind predictions. (It certainly will not be a bright naked-eye comet in the northern hemisphere.) I estimated the comet at being ninth magnitude with a centrally condensed coma that was perhaps 3-4' in size. There was a hint of a fan-shaped tail. I used magnifications of 118, 144, 162, 202, and 259x to view Comet LINEAR WM1. At the time (~03:05 UT) it was located within a group of field stars southeast of 48 Persei at 4h12m, +47d09'. Another ASH member arrived with some friends soon thereafter. I showed them NGC 2169 (the 37 Cluster) and M37 at 162x, Saturn and four of its satellites at 162 and 202x, M42 at 162x, and M31 and M32 at 162x. Before leaving I returned to the French Dome and joined the others in looking at the moon and Jupiter.

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