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Observations made in the constellation Ophiuchus:

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.2, est. to be in Ophiuchus)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 10-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: severe   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Sun Aug 26 01:00:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1701

This evening my friends Mike Dzubaty, Steve Borer and I observed Jupiter with Steve's 10" Dob. The South Equitorial Belt is still very difficult to see. However, the South Temperate Belt was easily seen through our scope. Both the North and South Polar Hoods seemed to be fading because Jupiter is receding from the Earth. Finally, all four of Jupiter's moons showed their discs nicely.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.3, est. to be in Ophiuchus, Est. RaDec 30)
Observer: Joe Caggiano (e-mail: jcaggiano@mindspring.com, web: http://home.mindspring.com/~jcaggiano/)
Instrument: 10-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Glenside, Pa, USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Tue Jul 31 15:00:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1687

First light with my new XT10 captured a transit of Europa crossing Jupiter's disk. The new scope reaches magnitude 15. Though the humidity and skyglow hamper my view in this area, condierable more detail was noticeable on Jupiter. I have posted pics on my website.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.3, est. to be in Ophiuchus)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 90-mm refractor   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Wed Jul 25 01:30:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1683

Last evening my friends Steve Borer, Mike Dzubaty and I observed Jupiter with Mike's refractor. Once again we could not see the South Equitorial Belt. I believe it has all but disappeared. The North Equitorial Belt is still easily seen and the South Temperate Belt seems well developed. It has been reported the North Temperate Belt has been reforming this year. After looking at the NTB I also noticed it is showing more of itself. I still don't see a complete solid line on the NTB. We also observed the double star Gamma Delphinus. Both componants were almost the same brightness and they both looked blue.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.5, est. to be in Ophiuchus)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 127-mm other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Sat Jul 7 02:45:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1677

Last evening I observed Jupiter with my 127mm MAK. The Great Red Spot still looks more red this year than in other years. It is very interesting to look at. I'm still having a hard time detecting the South Equitorial Belt. It has really faded this year. I'm still seeing festoons on the North Equitorial Belt and the South Polar Hood is still much more pronounced than the North Polar Hood. I also observed the sun this morning with my Sunspotter Solar Telescope. Now that Sunspot #961 has rotated off the sun's face there are no more sunspots on the sun's face.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.5, est. to be in Ophiuchus)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 127-mm other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: good
Time: Mon Jul 2 03:30:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1675

Last night I observed Jupiter with my 127mm MAK in order to view The Great Red Spot. The GRS is still looking mighty red to me. It's been years since I've seen seen it this red. I wonder if this is related to the South Equitorial Belt fading in brightness this year. Also there were festoons on the North Equitorial Belt. The weather on Jupiter seems to be really changing. Also this morning, I observed the sun with my Sunspotter Solar Telescope. Sunspot #961 is now past the sun's meridian and it remains a quiet sunspot.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.5, est. to be in Ophiuchus)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 127-mm other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Mon Jun 25 02:45:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1671

I just finished observing Jupiter with my 127mm MAK. The red spot looked more reddish in color than I've seen it in a long time. I looked at it for at least ten minutes and the red color really impressed me. Also the South Equitorial Belt has not disappeared. I was able to see it rather easily tonight. Earlier I observed Venus and it is now about a 45% waning crescent. Both ends of the crescent had obvious cusps on them. I've been seeing them for the last few observations.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.5, est. to be in Ophiuchus)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 10-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Sun Jun 24 02:00:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1670

Last evening my friends Mike Dzubaty, Steve Borer and I showed some astronomical objects for the public at the West Haven Beach. The first object we showed was the first quarter moon. The Apennines Mountains always show up best during the first quarter moon. Last night was no exception and the public enjoyed it. We then went to Venus which is now about a 45% waning crescent. There were some dark blotches in Venus' clouds. As usual Saturn was the big hit with the public and Titan was also in view. When we turned our scope on Jupiter, I noticed once again how difficult the South Equitorial Belt was to see. It seems to me the SEB has all but disappeared. Meanwhile both the North and South Temperate belts have become visible on Jupiter's face. We then moved to the bright star Antares. Surprisingly we were able to see Antares companion star with not to much difficulty. The smaller companion looked like it was attached to Antares. The double double was also split by our dob and we finished the evening off by showing Albereo the colorful star in the Summer Triangle. Once again we had a nice night of viewing.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.5, est. to be in Ophiuchus)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 127-mm other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Tue Jun 19 03:00:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1668

Last evening I observed Jupiter with my 127mm MAK. The North Equitorial Belt had a lot of festoons on it. I also saw a white oval that looked like it was on the south end of the NEB. The South Equitorial Belt could hardly be seen. The SEB has really faded this year and I think it's possible it will disappear altogether like it did in the 1990s. I was once again able to glimpse the South Temperate Belt. The South Polar Hood looks much larger and darker than its northern counterpart. I also observed Antares with my scope. When you look at Antares in a telescope, it looks yellower than it does in binoculars or the naked eye. This morning I observed the sun with my Sunspotter Solar telescope. There are no sunspots on the sun as has been true for the last week.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.5, est. to be in Ophiuchus)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 127-mm other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Fri Jun 8 03:55:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1666

This evening I observed Jupiter with my 127mm MAK in order to see The Great Red Spot which was transiting Jupiter's face. The GRS looked a rather tannish color. I read were some astronomers said it was a deeper red this year but I disagree. It looked a bit redder last year to me. I also noticed the GRS may be larger in size than last year but that is a big if. All four of Jupiter's moons were perfect disks.

Asteroid (Asteroid, est. mag 5.5, est. to be in Ophiuchus)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 127-mm other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Wed Jun 6 03:15:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1665

This evening I observed the asteroid Vesta with my 127mm MAK. In my scope Vesta showed a small disk that was yellow. That surprised me because in my 10X50 binoculars Vesta seemed to have an orange tint to it. Even though I couldn't see any surface detail, I still enjoyed the telescopic view of Vesta.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.5, est. to be in Ophiuchus)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 127-mm other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Wed May 30 05:00:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1660

Early this morning I observed Jupiter with my 127mm MAK. More and more detail is showing on Jupiter as opposition approaches. The north eqitorial belt is much darker than the south eqitorial belt. On the equitorial side of the NEB were two white ovals side by side. I believe these are more or less permanent features of Jupiter. As usual, Jupiter's moons were perfect disks. Several hours later I made me first observation of Mars for this year. The disk of Mars was much too small to see any detail but its south polar cap, which is now at its maximum size was easy to see. Since Mars is heading for spring in its southern hemisphere, the south polar cap will start to recede. Finally, hours later, I observed the sun with my Sunspotter Solar Telescope. Spaceweather.com reports a new sunspot, #958 has just emerged on the eastern limb. I cannot see it at all and I believe it has disapated.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.5, est. to be in Ophiuchus)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 127-mm other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: good
Time: Tue May 15 05:30:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1656

Early this moening, I observed Jupiter with my 127mm MAK with a 12mm Televue eyepiece. The north equitorial belt looks much darker than the south equitorial belt. The zones between the belts were very clear and as a result I was able to see white ovals near the SEB. The south polar hood was well seen but the north polar hood can only be seen faintly. Jupiters four moon's discs were easily seen. I then attached my Star Spectroscope onto my telescope so I could see the spetra of Antares located in Scorpio. I was able to count five spectral lines in Antares which shows what a cool old dying star Antares is. In fact Betelgeuse with seven spetral lines is the only bright star that is older and cooler than Antares.

M9 (Globular Cluster, in Ophiuchus)
Observer: Sriram.M.Gubbi (e-mail: sriram_gubbi@yahoo.co.in, web: http://dino.lm.com/artists/display.php?name=sriram_gubbi)
Instrument: 6-inch other   Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Fri Jan 20 05:50:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1477

A circular and a rich globular. Could'nt see anything more due to twilight.

M12 (Globular Cluster, in Ophiuchus)
Observer: Sriram.M.Gubbi (e-mail: sriram_gubbi@yahoo.co.in, web: http://dino.lm.com/artists/display.php?name=sriram_gubbi)
Instrument: 6-inch other   Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Fri Jan 20 05:30:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1476

It is located close to M10. Identical to M10 but appeared a bit larger and slightly oval with the same brightness as its neighbour.

M10 (Globular Cluster, in Ophiuchus)
Observer: Sriram.M.Gubbi (e-mail: sriram_gubbi@yahoo.co.in, web: http://dino.lm.com/artists/display.php?name=sriram_gubbi)
Instrument: 6-inch other   Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Fri Jan 20 05:20:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1475

Appeared a bit loose and slightly oval, but bright. I think I have seen this with my 2 inch about an year ago.

M62 (Globular Cluster, in Ophiuchus)
Observer: Sriram.M.Gubbi (e-mail: sriram_gubbi@yahoo.co.in, web: http://dino.lm.com/artists/display.php?name=sriram_gubbi)
Instrument: 6-inch other   Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Tue Jun 7 23:00:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1246

It is quite easy to find. Its a bit east to Tau scorpii. A first I thought it was M4 which I had found the same night. But later when I found this cluster was a bit far of Antares, I came to know that it was 'it'!

M107 (Globular Cluster, in Ophiuchus)
Observer: Akarsh Simha (e-mail: akarsh_simha@fastmail.fm)
Instrument: 8-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Light pollution: light   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Tue Jun 7 21:00:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1314

By Good Fortune, this night was excellent. This is a difficult globular (comparitively) and probably this was the best night to see it. It was very faint, quite small, and almost invisible. Eben on such a clear night, it required averted and periferral vision to see. Location is easy, but it is difficult to see. On a 8" f/8, 80x worked very well.

M14 (Globular Cluster, in Ophiuchus)
Observer: Akarsh Simha (e-mail: akarsh_simha@fastmail.fm)
Instrument: 8-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Light pollution: light   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Sat Mar 19 22:00:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1330

Faint Globular Cluster.No Central Brightness is seen.

NGC6572 (Planetary Nebula, in Ophiuchus)
Observer: Giorgos Koronis (e-mail: giorgos.koronis@lies.com)
Instrument: 8-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Parnon mountain, Greece
Light pollution: none   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: good
Time: Sat Jun 19 21:20:00 2004 UT   Obs. no.: 1022

A fluorescent green planetary nebula.Stellar at 45x(20mm plossl) a tiny disk at 91x(10mm plossl).Interesting object.Its color is striking!

M62 (Globular Cluster, in Ophiuchus)
Observer: Giorgos Koronis (e-mail: giorgos.koronis@lies.com)
Instrument: 8-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Kalamata, Greece
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: excellent
Time: Sun May 23 22:50:00 2004 UT   Obs. no.: 1009

Nice bright globular at the Ophiuchus-Scorpius border.In fact Burnham's celestial handbook lists it under Scorpius.According to the Cartes du Ciel software its in Ophiuchus.Thru the 8.8mm UWA(104x)it was like a bright comet without tail.Bright center.No hint of resolution.

M12 (Globular Cluster, in Ophiuchus)
Observer: Giorgos Koronis (e-mail: giorgos.koronis@lies.com)
Instrument: 8-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Kalamata, Greece
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: excellent
Time: Sun May 23 22:36:00 2004 UT   Obs. no.: 1006

Nice globular like its neighbour (M10) although smaller.Easily resolved with a 8.8mm UWA eyepiece(104x).The cluster gave me the impression of having an iregular shape.

M10 (Globular Cluster, in Ophiuchus)
Observer: Giorgos Koronis (e-mail: giorgos.koronis@lies.com)
Instrument: 8-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Kalamata, Greece
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: excellent
Time: Sun May 23 22:31:00 2004 UT   Obs. no.: 1005

Nice globular cluster!Easily resolved with a 8.8mm UWA eyepiece(104x).Many stars visible with direct vision at its edges.With averted vision stars visible across the face of the globular over a milky background.

M107 (Globular Cluster, in Ophiuchus)
Observer: Giorgos Koronis (e-mail: giorgos.koronis@lies.com)
Instrument: 8-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Kalamata, Greece
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: excellent
Time: Sun May 23 22:26:00 2004 UT   Obs. no.: 1008

Faint globular. A feauterless round cloud with 8.8mm UWA(104x).No hint of resolution.

Pluto (Planet, est. mag 13.8, est. to be in Ophiuchus, Est. RaDec 17h11m, -13d13')
Observer: Dave Mitsky (e-mail: djm28@psu.edu)
Instrument: 14.5-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Mifflintown, PA, USA
Light pollution: light   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Mon Jun 2 04:30:00 2003 UT   Obs. no.: 817

One of the many objects that my friend Tony Donnangelo and I observed from a dark site in the Tuscarora State Forest on Sunday night was the planet/Kuiper Belt object Pluto. Pluto was not terribly difficult to see through Tony's Starmaster once it had been positively identified. To the east of Pluto's postion was a diamond-shaped pattern of four faint field stars. A field star to the west when added to the diamond formed an asterism that resembled the constellation Delphinus. Pluto was but a dim speck to the west of that star.

Other (Other, est. mag 5, est. to be in Ophiuchus)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Wed May 22 04:30:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 649

Rho Ophiuchi is a triple star very close to Anteres. At 48x the main componant star has a blue white tinge to it. One of its fainter componants seems to be a bluish colored star. The other fainter componant appears to be yellow. The triple star can even be split in 10x50 binaculars, with a little difficulty. To find this star in binaculars, simply put Anteres at the bottom of the field and Rho Ophiuchi will be just above the middle of the field.

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