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Observations made in the constellation Pegasus:

Other (Other, est. mag 7, est. to be in Pegasus)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 50-mm binoculars   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Mon Jul 10 01:40:00 2017 UT   Obs. no.: 2012

After observing the sun today, I decided to observe the star HD162826 which is located in the one o'clock position from Vega. This star came out of the same star cluster as our own sun did 4.5 billion years ago. It is 15% larger than our sun but it does look yellow like our sun. Astronomers are hunting for more stars that came out of the sun's cluster.

NGC2 (Galaxy, in Pegasus)
Observer: Andrew Cooper (e-mail: acooper@pobox.com, web: http://www.siowl.com/)
Instrument: 46-cm Dobsonian reflector   Location: TIMPA, near Tucson, Arizona, United States
Light pollution: light   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Sun Aug 28 06:50:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1295

Small, very dim!! an averted vision object only despite approaching transit, round, no visible core or structure, just a circular patch, 2' south of NGC1

NGC1 (Galaxy, in Pegasus)
Observer: Andrew Cooper (e-mail: acooper@pobox.com, web: http://www.siowl.com/)
Instrument: 46-cm Dobsonian reflector   Location: TIMPA, near Tucson, Arizona, United States
Light pollution: light   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Sun Aug 28 06:50:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1294

Small, very dim, barely there, in a long isosceles triangle of dim (11-13 mag) stars with NGC2 just 2' to the south, round, even halo with no detail, no distinct core

M15 (Globular Cluster, in Pegasus)
Observer: Akarsh Simha (e-mail: akarsh_simha@fastmail.fm)
Instrument: 8-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Tue May 17 22:35:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1312

Bright, easily found and viewed. It is similar to M3 and M2, but is almost unresolvable even at high power of 170x on a 8" f/8.The field shows two stars on two opposite sides of the cluster

NGC7742 (Galaxy, in Pegasus)
Observer: Emil Neata (e-mail: forvert2000@yahoo.com, web: http://www.geocities.com/deep_sky_astronomy)
Instrument: 150-mm Dobsonian reflector   Location: Craiova, Romania
Light pollution: light   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Wed Nov 10 03:00:00 2004 UT   Obs. no.: 1099

NGC 7742 is small and faint. I've observed a dim star very close to the galaxy.

Comet (Comet, est. to be in Pegasus)
Observer: Pablo Vazquez (e-mail: llavi01@yahoo.com, web: http://home.comcast.net/~llavi1/Pablos_Astronomy_page.htm)
Instrument: 8-inch other   Location: Harleysville, Pa, USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Tue Feb 17 00:30:00 2004 UT   Obs. no.: 939

I looked at comet C/2002 T7 (LINEAR) lat night from my home. Comet was dificult to see with a pair of 10x50 binoculars. Not even sure if I could make it out at all from where I was. I used my Mead LX200(8in) at about 125x and was able to see it. Not much detail in it though only some condensation visible and hardly any details of the coma or nucleous. I didn't see a tail. I think it was because of the location I was observing from.

Comet (Comet, est. to be in Pegasus, Est. RaDec 00h12, +14d)
Observer: Dave Mitsky (e-mail: djm28@psu.edu)
Instrument: 17-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Lewisberry, Pennsylvania, USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Tue Feb 17 00:25:00 2004 UT   Obs. no.: 940

I had the opportunity to observe Comet LINEAR T7 from the ASH Naylor Observatory near Lewisberry, Pennsylvania, on Monday evening from 0:25 to ~1:10 UT (2004/2/17). The skies were initially fairly clear and transparent but high clouds eventually entered the scene. Tthe tail that I had first seen two Sundays ago was markedly longer and at times I thought I saw a bifurcation. A stellar pseudonucleus seemed to be present. The 17" f/15 classical Cassegrain was used at magnifications of 118, 144, 162, 202, 231, and 259x with 202x providing the best view of the comet.

Comet (Comet, est. mag ~7.4, est. to be in Pegasus, Est. RaDec 00h17m, +15d34')
Observer: Dave Mitsky (e-mail: djm28@psu.edu)
Instrument: 17-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Lewisberry, Pennsylvania, USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Mon Feb 9 01:00:00 2004 UT   Obs. no.: 938

I observed Comet C/2002 T7 (LINEAR) on Sunday evening prior to moonrise using the ASH 17" f/15 classical Cassegrain and a 5" f/5 refractor, the finder scope for the 17". A short tail was definitely visible. There was a distinct condensation within the largish coma. I used magnifications of 118, 162, 202, and 259x with 162x providing the best overall view. Conditions were good and the limiting magnitude was approximately 5.0 at the time. This was the first time that I was able to actually see the comet through the finder scope.

Comet (Comet, est. mag 5.5, est. to be in Pegasus)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: binoculars   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Thu Feb 6 00:00:00 2003 UT   Obs. no.: 775

Tonight, I took my 10x50 binoculars to the local soccer field to observe Comet Neat. The comets shape seems to have stretched out from last weeks roundish shape. The comet had a wispy tail that appeared to stretch out about .3 of a degree. I was not able to see it naked eye. When I returned home, I set up my 6" dob at 200x to observe Jupiter. I was able to see two white ovals on the southern edge of the North Equitorial Belt. The larger oval was just past the central meridian and the smaller oval was just getting ready to rotate off the planet. There is still no sign of the North Temperate Belt which disappeared about six weeks ago.

Comet (Comet, est. mag 5.0, est. to be in Pegasus, Est. RaDec 22 46.8)
Observer: Ted A. Nichols II (e-mail: tanicholsii@comcast.net)
Instrument: 17-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Lewisberry, PA, USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: excellent
Time: Wed Feb 5 01:00:00 2003 UT   Obs. no.: 774

I spent February 4th/5th, 2003 UT at the Astronomical Society Harrisburg's (www.astrohbg.org) Edward L. Naylor Astronomical Center in Lewisberry, PA (Lat 40.15 d N, 76.9 d W, Elev 390 m).Using the 17" f/15 Classical Cassegrain in the French Dome I observed Comet NEAT (C/2002 V1 NEAT) through the 5" f/5 finderscope and was able to see a tail confirmed by fellow members Bob Hoover and Vince Dangolovich.Though the eyepiece at powers of 162X, 206X, and 259x C/2002 V1 (NEAT) dispayed a .5 degree tail that could easily be followed with the telescope. All 3 observers present made their own measurements of the tail and we all agreed to have seen a .5 degree tail. The coma of the comet appeared somewhat more symmetric than the last time (it appeared egg shaped) I had seen it, and a central condensation was clearly evident. The tail was an extended ribbon with no fork evident. As things have progressed I saw the comet several times 2 weeks ago, 1 time last week, and again this week. The comet appeared brighter (5th Magnitude?) and this was the first time the tail was clearly visible. Prior we had though to had seen it in the exact same location we had seen it last night, so it obviously has brigtened and is spitting out more material.

Comet (Comet, est. mag ~7.8, est. to be in Pegasus, Est. RaDec 00h32m, +19d10')
Observer: Dave Mitsky (e-mail: djm28@psu.edu)
Instrument: 17-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Lewisberry, Pennsylvania, USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: fair
Time: Thu Jan 23 00:45:00 2003 UT   Obs. no.: 931

I had a look at C/2002 T7 (LINEAR) tonight (Thursday) at about 7:45 EST (00:45 UT 2004/1/23) through the 17" f/15 classical Cassegrain at the ASH Naylor Observatory. I used magnifications of 118, 162, and 202x. The U.O. 40mm MK-70 (162x) provided the best view. The comet was at 00h32m, +19d10' at the time. I noted a farily large and prominent coma. The twin tails that have been reported were not seen but a definite elongation was visible.

Comet (Comet, est. mag 6th, est. to be in Pegasus)
Observer: Dave Mitsky (e-mail: djm28@psu.edu)
Instrument: 17-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Lewisberry, PA, USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: poor
Time: Sat Jan 18 23:47:00 2003 UT   Obs. no.: 767

Last Saturday evening at approximately 23:47 UT I had the opportunity to observe Comet NEAT V1 with the ASH 17" f/15 classical Cassegrainat the Naylor Observatory shortly before high cirrus and the rising full moon spoiled the view completely. Magnifications used were 162(40mmn University Optics MK-70), 209 (31mm Tele Vue Nagler type 5), and 259x (25mm U.O. MK-70). C/2002 V1 (NEAT) was fairly bright but was hard to see through the 5" f/5 finder scope due to moonlight and poor transparency. Its large coma seemed asymmetrical and had noticeable condensation. The comet was soon lost in cirrus clouds so Dave Lassiter and Iturned our attention to his new Astrovid Color PlanetCam CCD Video System. Eventually we got all the bugs worked out and animpressively large image of Saturn appeared on the monitor. The seeing was rather poor but from time to time a sharp image of the planet ensued. The Cassini Division was easy to see as were thepolar hood and two southern hemisphere cloud belts. We pulled some tape and moved on to the Moon After Yule. The image scale produced by the 6477mm focal length classical Cassegrain resulted in a screen-filling image and slewing the telescope with the drive corrector proved tedious. I placed the camera in the 5" refractor and a much smaller and more aesthetically pleasing picture of the full moon flashed onto the screen.The clouds had grown worse so our final target was mighty Jupiter. The Galilean satellites were displayed through the 5" but disappeared when I lowered the gain to show the NEB and SEB. After a few minutes I moved the camera back to the focuser of the17". Even before I achieved best focus, which was somewhat difficult to do on all of the objects imaged, the GRS popped into view. It was pale but definitely pink in color. Unfortunately, there were noshadow transits or Galilean satellite mutual events to be seen.We also did some old fashioned eyeballing of Saturn and Jupiter at 259x. The GRS was just about in transit of the CM (the transit time was 2:27 UT) while all this was going on and was clearly visible through the eyepiece but was not as striking as it was on the monitor.

Other (Other, est. mag 15+, est. to be in Pegasus, Est. RaDec 23h28.5m,+22d25')
Observer: Dave Mitsky (e-mail: djm28@psu.edu)
Instrument: 18-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Cherry Springs State Park, Potter County, PA, USA
Light pollution: none   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Fri Jul 12 03:00:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 661

One of the more interesting objects that I observed under the very dark skies of Cherry Springs State Park last Thursday night was a recent type 1a supernova in NGC 7678, a 12.2 magnitude SAB(rs)c I-IIgalaxy located in Pegasus. With a magnitude of 15.1 to 15.5 SN2002dp was by far the dimmest exploding star that I have ever viewed. I could discern the supernova about 1/3 of the time with averted vision through an 18" Starmaster at high magnification. For a recent image of SN 2002dp see http://www.RochesterAstronomy.org/sn2002/n7678s3.jpg

Other (Other, est. mag 15+, est. to be in Pegasus, Est. RaDec 23h28.5m,+22d25')
Observer: Dave Mitsky (e-mail: djm28@psu.edu)
Instrument: 18-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Cherry Springs State Park, Potter County, PA, USA
Light pollution: none   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Fri Jul 12 00:00:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 660

One of the more interesting objects that I observed under the very dark skies of Cherry Springs State Park last Thursday night was a recent type 1a supernova in NGC 7678, a 12.2 magnitude SAB(rs)c I-IIgalaxy located in Pegasus. With a magnitude of 15.1 to 15.5 SN2002dp was by far the dimmest exploding star that I have ever viewed. I could discern the supernova about 1/3 of the time with averted vision through an 18" Starmaster at high magnification. For a recent image of SN 2002dp see http://www.RochesterAstronomy.org/sn2002/n7678s3.jpg

Comet (Comet, est. to be in Pegasus)
Observer: Dave Mitsky (e-mail: djm28@psu.edu)
Instrument: 8-inch equatorial reflector   Location: New Germantown, PA, USA
Light pollution: none   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Sun Jul 15 04:30:00 2001 UT   Obs. no.: 562

A group of eleven intrepid ASH members traveled to Little Knob, whichis located north of New Germantown in the wilds of western PerryCounty, Pennsylvania on Saturday, July 14th. After a rather interesting drive mysignificant other and I arrived at the observing site. Although theclearing was rather small and the horizons were not the best, thedarkness of the site more than made up for these shortcomings. Thesky was fantastic and was the best that I have ever experienced inPennsylvania with the exception of Cherry Springs. The visuallimiting magnitude easily exceeded 6.0. The Milky Way was rich andfinely detailed. M13 and Comet LINEAR A2 were visible to the nakedeye. The comet was brighter than I had expected apparently havingundergone an outburst and exhibited a large coma and a short andfaint tail telescopically.This time around I came armed with my 101mm Tele Vue Genesis sdfPetzval refractor and Meade Safari Pro 8x42 binoculars. The otheroptical instruments on hand included Celestron Ultima 7x50's,Celestron Deluxe 20x80's, a Meade 60mm refractor, an 80mm Paul Rinirefractor, a vintage Meade 8" Newtonian, a heavily modified 10" MeadeStarfinder Dob, a 10" Meade LX5, and a 12" Meade LX200. (Wow, that'sa lot of Meade!)Here are just a few of the objects that I viewed through variousinstruments on that fine night:12" f/10 LX2000 - M8, M57, M13, T Lyrae, Comet LINEAR A2, NGC 6210,NGC 7662 (the Blue Snowball), NGC 7789, NGC 6888 (the CrescentNebula), NGC 6703, NGC 7009 (the Saturn Nebula), NGC 7293, Almach(Gamma Andromedae), Venus and Saturn in the same FOV10" f/10 LX50 - M51, M13, Comet LINEAR A2, Venus and Saturn in thesame FOV10" f/4.5 Meade - M81 and M82, M31, Comet LINEAR A2, Venus and Saturnin the same FOV8" f/6 Meade Newtonian - M51, the tail of Comet LINEAR A2101mm f/5.4 Genesis sdf - Mars, M8, M20, M17, M18, M24, M22, 15Aquilae, V Aquilae, M11, NGC 7000 (the North American Nebula) with a35mm Panoptic and an O-III filter, the Cygnus Loop (NGC 6960 and NGC6992) with a 35mm Panoptic and Lumicon O-III filter, Comet LINEAR A2,NGC 7293 (the Helix or Helical Nebula), M27, Albireo (Beta Cygni),the Double Cluster (NGC 869 and NGC 884), Stock 2 (the MusclemanCluster), the waning moon, and 2 stars reappearing from lunaroccultation, an International Space Station and STS-104 Atlantis pass80mm f/7 achromat: M8, M11, M17, M3160mm Meade achromat: M45Celestron Deluxe 20x80's - Comet LINEAR A2, the Double Cluster, Stock2Meade 8x42's - the Milky Way, various summer Messier objects, M31,Comet LINEAR A2, the Coathanger, the Double Cluster, Stock 2, NGC7000, Noss 2-2 pass, an International Space Station and STS-104Atlantis passCelestron Ultima 7x50's - various summer Messier objects, theCoathanger, Comet LINEAR A2Naked eye - M8, M13, M31, several meteors, a gorgeous Milky Way,several satellite passes, an International Space Station and STS-104Atlantis passSome of the many highlights included seeing the Messier objects M8,M31, M51, M81 and M82 through various scopes, the Cygnus Loop throughthe Genesis sdf, the short tail of Comet LINEAR A2 through the 8"Meade, NGC 7000 through the Genesis sdf, NGC 7293 through the LX200and Genesis sdf, and the passes by Noss 2-2 and the docked ISS andAtlantis. But by far the most striking moment of the night came whenVenus and Saturn cleared the eastern tree line and were visible inthe same telescopic field of view, an uncommon event indeed.

Comet (Comet, est. to be in Pegasus)
Observer: Dave Mitsky (e-mail: djm28@psu.edu)
Instrument: 17-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Harrisburg, PA, USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: fair
Time: Sat Jul 14 05:30:00 2001 UT   Obs. no.: 561

Date: 2001/7/14 UTConditions: Seeing: 4/10, Transparency: 6/10Location: ASH Naylor Observatory (http://www.astrohbg.org)Telescopes: 80mm f/5 Orion ShortTube achromat, 5" f/5 finderscope, 17" f/15 equatorially mounted classical CassegrainOculars (17"): 40mm U.O. MK-70 (162x), 32mm U.O. Koenig-II (202x), 25mm U.O. MK-70 (259x) Oculars (80mm): 26mm Tele Vue Ploessl (15x), 7mm Tele Vue Nagler type 1 (57x)On Friday night (7/13-14) I began another successful planetary marathonusing the 17" f/15 classical Cassegrain at the ASH Naylor Observatory,which is located about 2 miles northwest of Lewisberry, PA. I was tofinish the task with a much more modest instrument, an 80mm f/5 OrionShortTube refractor. There were periods of cloudiness early in the eveningand early in the morning but I was fortunate enough to have clear skieswhen I needed them. The limiting magnitude was a bit above 5.0 with theMilky Way being somewhat noticeable.Mars (162 and 202x) was my first planetary target at 01:50 UT. The seeingwas rather mediocre and with the ongoing planet encircling dust storm Icould see absolutely no surface features using a CC30M magenta filter at202x.I then observed a few globular clusters (M5, M19, and M107) at 162x beforemoving on to Pluto (162 and 259x) at 03:05 UT. Two fellow ASH members hadtheir first ever look at the dim, distant planet (or Kuiper Belt object).Next came some globular clusters (M55, M54, M75, M28, and M22) and nebulae(M8 and M20 with an Orion UltraBlock filter) in the constellation ofSagittarius at 162x.My next target was another shallow sky object, Comet LINEAR A2. The cometwas quite easy to see through 10x50's and the 5" f/5 finder scope. Throughthe 17" I could see some irregularity in the shape of the large coma at 162and 259x but no unmistakable tail or stellar pseudonuclei. The cometappeared rather circular through the binocular and was not as bright as M31.At 06:02 UT I logged a delightfully blue Neptune (162, 202, and 259x) andat 06:06 UT Uranus met my gaze (162, 202, and 259x).M30 (162x) was followed by a brief inspection of the rising moon and thenasteroid 1 Ceres (162x) at 06:20 UT. Ceres was just to the east of zetaSagittarii at the bottom of the Teapot's handle. At that point the skybecame mostly cloudy and I began to close up the French Dome.When I returned to my humble abode I set up my ShortTube 80 and had a quickpeak at Venus and Saturn along with Aldebaran and the Hyades as they rosein the east at 08:50 UT. Magnifications used were 15 and 57x.An hour later I captured photons from Jupiter and Mercury (15 and 57x) asdawn approached. After a final view of Luna at 57x I called it a night.

NGC7331 (Galaxy, in Pegasus, Est. RaDec 22h37m +34)
Observer: Thomas Godfrey (e-mail: choccy_bourbon@hotmail.com)
Instrument: 8-inch Schmidt-Cassegrain reflector   Location: Norwich, Norfolk, England
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: excellent
Time: Mon Jan 15 17:55:00 2001 UT   Obs. no.: 595

More edge on than expected as only the major axis was seen, perhaps due to the less than favourable conditions. A brightish core was observed and one sharp edge on the western fringe, suggesting a dust-lane. In better conditions with an 18" scope and a 2" Nagler NGC7331 and Stephans can be seen together which is a superb sight.

NGC7137 (Galaxy, in Pegasus, Est. RaDec 21h48m +22 10')
Observer: John Stewart (e-mail: fstewart@redrose.net, web: http://www.fstewart@redrose.net)
Instrument: 16-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Conestoga, PA, USA
Light pollution: light   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: good
Time: Sat Aug 26 05:20:00 2000 UT   Obs. no.: 537

Irregular shaped galaxy located 10 degrees north of M15 in constellation Pegasus. I used wide field eyepieces in Televue's Bino viewer to give me magnifications of 164x and 233x. It appeared rather faint, fairly large and evenlly diffused with a 14 mag star touching its northwest edge.

NGC7448 (Galaxy, in Pegasus, Est. RaDec 23h00.1m, +15d59')
Observer: Dave Mitsky (e-mail: djm28@psu.edu, web: http://www.ezonline.com/ash/obs.htm)
Instrument: 17-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Harrisburg, PA, USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: excellent
Time: Wed Oct 6 05:45:00 1999 UT   Obs. no.: 482

I first observed this 11.2 magnitude H400 spiral galaxy almost 3 years ago. NGC 7448 is far larger and brighter than a group of 12th and 13th magnitude galaxies, including NGC 7463, NGC 7464, and NGC 7465, that lie to the east. It was seen as an elongated streak through the ASH 17" f/15 classical Cassegrain (202x) and earlier in the night through the ASH 12.5" f/6.5 Cave Newtonian.

M15 (Globular Cluster, in Pegasus)
Observer: Mark Stutzman (e-mail: mark@cca.ci.coatesville.pa.us)
Instrument: 4 1/2-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Gilbertsville, PA, usa
Light pollution: light   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Thu Jul 23 03:00:00 1998 UT   Obs. no.: 372

This globular was easily seen this evening. I could even resolve some individual stars around the edges. I also went on a little open cluster spree. I observed m52 , m39 and m29 in Cygnus. m29 was a little dim but with averted vision I was able to resolve about 15 or so dim stars. Then clouds moved in and ruined my evening.

NGC7094 (Planetary Nebula, in Pegasus, Est. RaDec 21h37m, +12d47')
Observer: Dave Mitsky (e-mail: djm28@psu.edu)
Instrument: 51-cm equatorial reflector   Location: Harrisburg, PA, USA
Light pollution: light   Transparency: good   Seeing: fair
Time: Wed Dec 3 02:05:00 1997 UT   Obs. no.: 261

My eagle-eyed friend Bob Hoover located the November 1997 Astronomy Observer's Challenge object, NGC 7094. This 95" planetary nebula lies 1.5 degrees to the northeast of M15. Using a Tele Vue 32mm Wide Field eyepiece (159x) equipped with an Orion Ultrablock filter and then a Lumicon O-III filter allowed us to see (barely) this very dim stellar remnant.

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