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Observations made in the constellation Hercules:

M13 (Hercules Cluster) (Globular Cluster, in Hercules)
Observer: Marcos González Troyas (e-mail: mgtroyas@gmail.com)
Instrument: 8-inch Schmidt-Cassegrain reflector   Location: Madrid, Madrid, Spain
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Sat Jul 15 00:15:00 2017 UT   Obs. no.: 2015

Se resuelven las estrellas fácilmente.

Satellite (Satellite, est. mag -7, est. to be in Hercules)
Observer: Mark D. Schneider (e-mail: markd_s@yahoo.com)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: Garden Grove, California, United States of America
Light pollution: light   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Tue Jul 1 04:10:00 2014 UT   Obs. no.: 1923

Iridium 61 fairly high flare.

Satellite (Satellite, est. mag 7, est. to be in Hercules)
Observer: Mark D. Schneider (e-mail: markd_s@yahoo.com)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: Garden Grove, California, United States of America
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Tue May 27 05:02:24 2014 UT   Obs. no.: 1912

Iridium 59 near Vega

Other (Other, est. mag -8, est. to be in Hercules)
Observer: Mark D. Schneider (e-mail: markd_s@yahoo.com)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: Garden Grove, California, United States of America
Light pollution: light   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Wed Aug 22 02:58:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1699

This was one of the BEST Flare opportunities afforded to me...CalSky.com predicted it as Iridium 82 and it was STUPENDOUS from this location.

M13 (Hercules Cluster) (Globular Cluster, in Hercules)
Observer: Christina (e-mail: christinabischoff@hotmail.com)
Instrument: 10-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Rio Rico, AZ, USA
Light pollution: light   Seeing: excellent
Time: Sun Aug 12 05:07:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1690

I decided to try for an easier object for my first ever try at finding something on my own. Even through the small amount of light pollution from the street lights below, it was clear; the center was too crowded with stars to make out the individual ones, but the outer stars were distinguishable. I'm definately thankful I managed to finally stumble upon it!

M13 (Hercules Cluster) (Globular Cluster, in Hercules)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 8-inch refractor   Location: New Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Fri May 4 01:00:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1650

This evening my friends Mike Dzubaty, his son Mike, Steve Borer and I visited the Leitner Observatory at Yale University for a night of viewing through their big scopes. The first object we viewed was Venus in an 8" Schmidt Cassegarain. Venus is still slightly more than half lit. I noticed some albedo features at the terminator. Next we went to the 8" refractor to observe Saturn. The Cassini Division showed well on the planet. On the face of Saturn itself, I noticed two belts and the polar south polar hood showed well. We then went over to the 16" reflecter were we had the pleasure of observing the double star Iota Cancri. The brighter componant was gold and the dimmer star was blue. It's not known if Iota Cancri is a real double or just an opticle double. The grand finale was the globular cluster M13. In the 16" scope we were able to see an lot of individual stars in the cluster. Before we went home we watched an orange moon that was just passed full rise in the east. Another great night of astronomy!

Comet (Comet, est. mag 6, est. to be in Hercules)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: good
Time: Tue Oct 31 00:30:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1575

This evening, my friends, Mike Dzubaty, Steve Borer and I observed Comet Swan with Mike's 6" dob and my 12mm televue eyepiece. With this fairly high power, we were able to see three seperate steller points within the head of the comet. The comet's center actually looks fragmented to me. Since a first quarter moon was out, we were not able to see a tail this time around. Finally, the comet still retained the slightest tinge of green color.

M92 (Globular Cluster, in Hercules, Est. RaDec 17h17m6s 437'58")
Observer: James Turley (e-mail: admin@backyard-sketches.co.uk, web: http://backyard-sketches.co.uk)
Instrument: 305-mm Dobsonian reflector   Location: Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Thu Sep 7 20:01:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1781

Could not resolve any core stars, bright though, easily as nice as M13

M92 (Globular Cluster, in Hercules)
Observer: Sriram.M.Gubbi (e-mail: sriram_gubbi@yahoo.co.in, web: http://dino.lm.com/artists/display.php?name=sriram_gubbi)
Instrument: 6-inch other   Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Fri Jan 20 05:40:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1478

I think I've seen this one earlier but this time, it appeared beautiful, showing hints of resolution with a bright centre. One peculiar fact is that it appears brighter than M13 to my eyes!

NGC6210 (Planetary Nebula, in Hercules)
Observer: Sriram.M.Gubbi (e-mail: sriram_gubbi@yahoo.co.in, web: http://dino.lm.com/artists/display.php?name=sriram_gubbi)
Instrument: 6-inch other   Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Sun Jan 1 05:30:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1462

A very easy planetary nebula. It formed a sort of right angled triangle with two other sides with itself being the 'star' opposite to the hypotenuse. A greenish-blue disc, smaller than other planetaries. Dew and twilight did'nt allow further observations of the planetary.

NGC6210 (Planetary Nebula, in Hercules)
Observer: Akarsh Simha (e-mail: akarsh_simha@fastmail.fm)
Instrument: 8-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: good
Time: Fri Sep 23 16:15:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1336

An easy, bright, tiny planetary. Easy to locate (I nearly found it in the first shot). The field shows three widely spaced bright stars, a faint star and a comparatively brighter "star" (NGC 6210) visible only thru averted vision at 80x magnification. However at abt. 100x, it becomes more clear that tbe "star" is not a star and its bluish colour is cognizable. The blue colour is not so intense - definitely not like NGC 3242 or NGC 7009. Very faint blue colour was apparent. Best view on my scope was at 170x (an eyepiece of 9 mm focal length gives me this), where it shows an elliptical disc of small eccentricity (and probably a few filaments???). No more detail could be extracted.

M13 (Hercules Cluster) (Globular Cluster, in Hercules)
Observer: Vedran Vrhovac (e-mail: vedran_vrhovac@yahoo.com)
Instrument: 8-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Velika Gorica, Croatia
Light pollution: light   Transparency: fair   Seeing: good
Time: Mon Jul 25 22:30:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1268

I just bought my 8" Dob. I decided to test dob on my favorite target, M13. At 38x cluster was a bright round fuzzy, but at 80x i show countless star. At 200x only core wasn't resovled. M13 gave me superb views.

M13 (Hercules Cluster) (Globular Cluster, in Hercules, Est. RaDec 16.7 36.5)
Observer: Vedran (e-mail: vedran_vrhovac@yahoo.com)
Instrument: 76-mm other   Location: Velika Gorica, Croatia
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: good
Time: Fri May 27 22:00:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1245

When I first observed M13 it seemed incredibly dim to me. Now its a standard DS object on my observing list.Through my 76mm scope it looks like round bright nebula with granulated edge at 38x. I estimated size to 5 arc minutes.Higher magnification (56x and 117x) only dim this wonderful object.

M13 (Hercules Cluster) (Globular Cluster, in Hercules)
Observer: Emil Neata (e-mail: forvert2000@yahoo.com, web: http://www.astroclubul.org/emilneata)
Instrument: 60-mm refractor   Location: Craiova, Romania
Light pollution: light   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Tue Jan 25 00:00:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1173

Seen through a 60mm telescope, all globular clusters are small, nebulous objects. The only cluster I've managed to resolve into stars, only towards the edges, is M 13.

NGC6207 (Galaxy, in Hercules)
Observer: Emil Neata (e-mail: forvert2000@yahoo.com, web: http://www.geocities.com/deep_sky_astronomy)
Instrument: 150-mm Dobsonian reflector   Location: Craiova, Romania
Light pollution: light   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Wed Nov 10 03:00:00 2004 UT   Obs. no.: 1096

Separated only 25' from the famous globular cluster M 13, you will find NGC 6207, a magnitude 12.2 galaxy. It has an elliptic shape, with condensation towards the bright nucleus.

M92 (Globular Cluster, in Hercules)
Observer: Joe Caggiano (e-mail: jcaggiano@mindspring.com)
Instrument: 70-mm binoculars   Location: Horsham, Pa., USA
Light pollution: light   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Wed Oct 6 03:00:00 2004 UT   Obs. no.: 1071

Only had a few minutes tonight so I used the binos. It was crisp and clear with no wind. I laid down on the back deck and stared straight up at the Cygnus / Lyra / Hercules and Cassiopea region of starfields and slowly swept in everything I could see. North and East of Vega I picked up a smudge, towards the Hercules region. I knew it was not M13 but looked very similar. For a brief second I thought I had spotted a comet. After checking the star chart I realized what I had "discovered" was actually M92. Hazy yet conspicous in binos it seems to be similar to M13 in magnitude and apparent size. I will have to pull out the scope in order to see more similarities at a later date.

M13 (Hercules Cluster) (Globular Cluster, in Hercules)
Observer: Joe Caggiano (e-mail: jcaggiano@mindspring.com)
Instrument: 6-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Horsham, Pa., USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Mon Oct 4 02:00:00 2004 UT   Obs. no.: 1065

Decided to use my Celestron 15x70 Skymaster Binos due to having company over and did not have the 6" reflector cooled down. M13 was rather faint in the binos. The cluster was about the size of the full moon is to the naked eye. Very faint and could see only the core when looking around the edges of the FOV and not straight on. Last month I had viewed it with the 6" reflector. At 30x it was still faint, but then again there was almost a full moon and some evening haze in the air. I will try again this week.

NGC6058 (Planetary Nebula, in Hercules)
Observer: Giorgos Koronis (e-mail: giorgos.koronis@lies.com)
Instrument: 8-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Kalamata, Greece
Light pollution: light   Transparency: good   Seeing: excellent
Time: Sun May 23 22:10:00 2004 UT   Obs. no.: 1003

I observed this faint planetary in Hercules using a Meade 8.8 UWA eyepiece (103x).Field identified with the help of Cartes du Ciel software.It was a small faint and feauterless round disk, better seen thru an O-III filter.

M13 (Hercules Cluster) (Globular Cluster, in Hercules)
Observer: Sriram.M.Gubbi (e-mail: sriram_gubbi@yahoo.co.in)
Instrument: 50-mm refractor   Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Light pollution: light   Transparency: fair   Seeing: excellent
Time: Sat May 1 20:30:00 2004 UT   Obs. no.: 1204

this globular cluster appears a little spread out than other globulars through my scope.but by averted vision it really looks beautiful though not resolved into stars.

Other (Other, est. mag ~15.0, est. to be in Hercules, Est. RaDec 16h42m, +36d42' )
Observer: Dave Mitsky (e-mail: djm28@psu.edu)
Instrument: 30-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Cherry Springs State Park, Potter County, Pennsylvania, USA
Light pollution: none   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: good
Time: Thu Aug 28 02:00:00 2003 UT   Obs. no.: 876

I observed IC 4617, the dim Index Catalogue spiral galaxy near M13, for the first time through Tom Whiting's new 30" Dob at Cherry Srings State Park two days before the start of the Black Forest Star Party. M13 was fantastic at 388x and at 11.6 magnitude the spiral NGC 6207 seemed extremely bright through the large aperture. IC 4617 is situated 14.4' NNE of M13, approximately halfway between NGC 6207 and M13, and seemed rather small at 1.2' x 0.4' but not particularly difficult to see. It appeared as a tiny, circular, non-stellar object. An image of IC 4617 is available at http://www.justjim.com/ctsp/

M13 (Hercules Cluster) (Globular Cluster, in Hercules)
Observer: Paul (e-mail: paul_ohstbucks@msn.com)
Instrument: 16-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Kansas City, MO, USA
Light pollution: light   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Sun Mar 30 08:00:00 2003 UT   Obs. no.: 796

Last night was my first observation of M13 since last fall when it was lost to the sunset. It amazed me once again in its size and brightness. At 205x, the entire cluster was clearly resolved and bright with masses of stars forming shapes and knots sprawled throughout the cluster. Taking advantage of the great seeing, I went to 310x and almost fell off my stepstool. I was peering directly into the center of the core. At 310x, the outer portions of the Halo spilled outside the FOV. I then went to 410x and was able to look through the thousands of tightly packed the central core stars and out through to the space behind. My best view of M13 to date. One of these days, I'll have to get behind some really big glass to check this cluster out.

M13 (Hercules Cluster) (Globular Cluster, in Hercules)
Observer: Paul (e-mail: paul_ohstbucks@msn.com)
Instrument: 14-inch Schmidt-Cassegrain reflector   Location: Hillsdale Lake, KS, USA
Light pollution: light   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: fair
Time: Sun Sep 1 03:00:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 707

M13 showed all its beauty tonight. The stars seemed to form patterns as they stretched out in what seemed like arms....with knots and bulges of stars sprawling out from the central core. It completely filled the field of view in the nagler.

Asteroid (Asteroid, est. mag 9-10, est. to be in Hercules)
Observer: Dave Mitsky (e-mail: djm28@psu.edu)
Instrument: 17-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Lewisberry, PA, USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: excellent
Time: Sun Aug 18 06:18:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 677

Things were not looking very good last night in south central Pennsylvania for a successful observation of the NEA 2002 NY40. However, my persistence paid off in spades as I was fortunate enough to have a hole in the overcast develop on Sunday morning around 6:00 UT. Using the ASH 17" f/15 classical Cassegrain, which is not the easiest instrument to do this sort of observing with by the way, I located 2002 NY40 in the constellation of Hercules at 6:18 UT and tracked it for over 20 minutes. Magnifications of 162 (40mm University Optics MK-70), 259 (25mm U.O. MK-70), 324 (20mm Meade Wide Angle), 381 (17mm Pro-Optics Ploessl), and 498x (13mm Tele Vue Ploessl) were employed. At 498x it was quite difficult to keep the asteroid in view for very long. :-) I'd observed the speedy NEA 1996 JA1 with the same telescope 6 years ago but 2002 NY40 was much swifter, the fastest natural object that I've ever seen through a telescope other than the occasional meteor. Afterwards a fellow ASH member put C/2002 O4 (Hoenig) into view using coordinates that I supplied to him. The transparency was not very good but the comet was nevertheless visible. At 118x (55mm U.O. Ploessl), 202 (32mm U.O. Koenig-II), and 259x Comet Hoenig did not appear to be appreciably different than my last view of it a week before at Stellafane. The coma was diffuse and poorly condensed. I also was able to observe a number of denizens of the deep-sky through the 17" (at 118x) and its 5" f/5 finder - M57, M92, Stock 2, the Double Cluster, the Alpha Persei Association, Almach, M34, M15, M31, and Gamma Arietis - before the clouds returned.

Comet (Comet, est. mag ~5th, est. to be in Hercules)
Observer: Dave Mitsky (e-mail: djm28@psu.edu)
Instrument: 17-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Harrisburg, PA, USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: fair
Time: Thu May 16 02:00:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 648

I motored to the ASH Naylor Observatory (http://www.astrohbg.org) on Wednesday night to help with the observing portion of the Spring 2002 Introductory Observational Astronomy class and to photograph the ongoing alignment of the planets. When I arrived I first had a look at Jupiter through the 17" f/15 classical Cassegrain at 202x (Venus and Mars followed a bit later) and then set up my Pentax K1000, 50mm lens, and tripod. At 01:02 UT I took a 20 second exposure followed by additional exposures about 20 and 40 minutes later. Prior to that I'd alerted the students and other ASH members about an upcoming Iridium flare. At 01:27 UT Iridium 74 unleashed its reflective brilliance, reaching a predicted seventh magnitude. (The flare center was only 4.9 kilometers to the west.) Hopefully, I was able to capture yet another flare on film. After the brief flash of light I followed the satellite briefly through another ASH member's Fujinon 16x70's. Using the 12.5" f/6.5 Cave Newtonian I showed some of those present the Lobster Claw (Crater Gutenburg). The crater was situated for the most part on the unlit side of the terminator but its crustacean outline was unmistable nevertheless. I returned to the French Dome and trained the 17" on Gutenburg. After everyone interested had seen it I moved on to what I call the Tomahawk or the Reflex Hammer, the peculiar lunar feature located near Mare Crisium, and then increased the magnification to 259x. Another ASH member asked me to confirm his tripod mounted 10x50 sighting of C/2002 C1 (Ikeya-Zhang). The comet was to the north of the Great Hercules Cluster (M13) and seemed to be at least twice M13's apparent size. Both were easily visible in the same field of view. Next I put Comet Ikeya-Zhang and M13 into view with the 16x70's. I turned the 17" to the comet. Both objects were visible simultaneously through the 5" f/5 finder scope. At 162x Comet Ikeya-Zhang displayed an oddly skewed coma but no hint of its now dim tail was seen. The big scope next collected photons from M13 (162 and 259x). Two more ASH members had arrived while everyone else had taken their leave. One was going to look at binary stars with the 12.5" so I suggested Gamma Virginis. The rapidly closing separation of this system and only fair seeing made a clean split impossible with the 17" at 259x. Using a 19mm Tele Vue Wide Field (340x) did the trick. I moved on to another Gamma double, the golden Gamma Leonis (340x). Soon just one ASH member besides yours truly remained. I had a peak at M13 through his 10" Meade SCT before returning to the dome where I finished the night with a few spring deep-sky objects - M104 (162 and 259x), M84 (162x), and M86 (162x). Although I didn't do nearly as much observing as I would have on my own, I did manage to impart some knowledge to the students and accomplished some paper work in the classroom building as well as a minor repair in the dome. All in all it was three hours very well spent.

Comet (Comet, est. mag ~5th, est. to be in Hercules)
Observer: Dave Mitsky (e-mail: djm28@psu.edu)
Instrument: 101-mm refractor   Location: Harrisburg, PA, USA
Light pollution: light   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: good
Time: Sat May 11 02:00:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 647

I spent most of Friday night and some of Saturday morning observingfrom one of the best "nearby" (a mere hour and a half drive from myresidence) dark sky sites. On the final leg of the journey mysignificant other and I stopped for a few minutes to view the closepairing of Venus and Mars through her Celestron Ultima 10x50's andthen drove up Little Knob to Camp Site 52. Tony Donnangelo, a fellowASH member, was already observing with his 10" LX6 Meade SCT when wefinally arrived.The night began with fair seeing and good transparency - a visuallimiting magnitude of perhaps a shade above 6.0. This was all tochange with the passage of time, unfortunately.Before too long I had my 101mm f/5.4 Tele Vue Genesis sdf refractorset up and trained on Jupiter at 193x (7mm Tele Vue Nagler type 1 and2.5x Tele Vue Powermate). (I had originally thought about bringing my12.5" f/4.8 Starsplitter Dob but since my friend Roger Studer had saidhe was going to come with his 15" Obsession I decided against it. Asit turned out Roger decided not to make the trip because of concernsabout the weather. Two other ASH members had also planned to come butan automobile accident thwarted them.) My next targets were M81 andM82. Both galaxies were easily visible through my 19mm Tele VuePanoptic (28x).I followed with Comet Ikeya-Zhang, which was to the east of the fineglobular cluster M92 in Hercules. The 60x view with Tony's new 9mmNagler type 6 was superb. Since Tony wasn't using the 9mm with his SCTI had a fine old time auditioning it. I was to revisit the comet anumber of times throughout the night and as it climbed towards thezenith its coma was clearly asymetrical although I could never quiteconvince myself that I could see a tail. The fifth magnitude comet wasjust on the verge of naked-eye visibility.During the course of the night I observed quite a few deep-sky objectswith the aid of only 4 inches of ground and polished glass. Theseincluded M101, M5, M13, M104, M65, M66, Gamma Leonis, M87 and otherVirgo and Coma Cluster galaxies, M3, Cor Caroli, IC 4665, Antares B, M4, M8, M11, and V Aquilae. The highly elongated "needle" galaxy sometimes known as Berenices' Hairclip (NGC 4565) was only a small streak of gray at 60x. Near the end of the session I had a fairly good view of NGC 7000 (the North American Nebula) using Tony's 48mm Lumicon O-III filter and my 35mm Panoptic (15x) despite its less than optimum placement.Through Tony's telescope I saw M51, NGC 4195, M81, M82, NGC 2976, NGC3077, NGC 3079, M97, M108, M109, M101, M94, M106, NGC 4631, M53, M84,M86, NGC 4435, NGC 4438, M3, and other celestial eye candy using a40mm Tele Vue Wide Field, a 22mm Nagler type 4, and a 17mm Nagler type4.Sometime after 06:30 UT the occasional horizon hugging clouds becamemore troublesome, spelling the beginning of the end as they began tocover increasingly large portions of the heavenly dome.The highlights of the night were seeing C/2002 C1 (Ikeya-Zhang) nearthe zenith through the Genesis sdf and later through the 10" SCT andviewing the classic edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 4565 at 28 and 60xthrough the refractor, as well as the heart of the Virgo Cluster (M84and M86) and parts of Markarian's Chain at 60x.

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