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Observations of objects of type "Other":

Other (Other, est. mag 7, est. to be in Pegasus)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 50-mm binoculars   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Mon Jul 10 01:40:00 2017 UT   Obs. no.: 2012

After observing the sun today, I decided to observe the star HD162826 which is located in the one o'clock position from Vega. This star came out of the same star cluster as our own sun did 4.5 billion years ago. It is 15% larger than our sun but it does look yellow like our sun. Astronomers are hunting for more stars that came out of the sun's cluster.

Other (Other)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Time: Wed Jul 16 00:30:00 2014 UT   Obs. no.: 1928

This evening, My brother Anthony, my friends Dave, Mike & I saw the most incredible sunset. Beside the great colors, we counted more than 30 Crespiculer rays. We ended up watching this sunset for more than a half an hour!

Other (Other, est. mag -3)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Sat Sep 7 03:30:00 2013 UT   Obs. no.: 1892

This evening I watched the Ladee rocket go by my condo after it took off from Wallops Island for the moon. It burned brightly during the first stage & then I couldn't see it anymore after the first stage flameout. It was impressive.

Other (Other, est. to be in Canis Major)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 127-mm other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Tue Jan 4 04:15:00 2011 UT   Obs. no.: 1863

Last evening, my brother Anthony and I were able to split Sirius B from Sirius A. Sirius B is now extending farther away from Sirius A in its orbit around its parent star. During brief moments of good seeing, we were able to see a gap between the two stars. Sirius B will continue extending out in its orbit from Sirius A until the year 2025 so we have many years to split this interesting double star.

Other (Other, est. to be in Orion)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 50-mm binoculars   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Sun Nov 14 04:00:00 2010 UT   Obs. no.: 1862

This evening, I observed three asterisms, two in Orion and one in Taurus that I read about in Sky & Telescope Magazine. The first and the best asterism is called Davis' Dog and it is located just above the Hyedes Star Cluster. Davis' Dog looks like a cartoon charecter. The next asterism is called the Beach Chair Asterism and this asterism is located in Orion's head. Above that is the Beach Umbrella Asterism and this looks like like an umbrella with a bent pole. I've been looking at this part of the sky for years and I never noticed these asterisms so try to take a look at them. You'll like them.

Other (Other)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: Winslow, Arizona, United States
Time: Wed May 12 17:00:00 2010 UT   Obs. no.: 1850

Last Week my two friends Dave and Joey and I toured the dessert southwest where we happened upon Meteor Crater. There are two observing platforms to view this crater. This huge crater shoewed nice terracing in the upper half of the crater. Also, there is a fault line running up and down one end of the crater. It was a sight I will never forget. Inside the building there was a display depicting the 1908 meteor strike in Siberia. There where pictures of the smashed forest caused by the meteor strike. They even had real tree branches stacked on top of each other to show what it was like. Both Meteor strikes are explained thoroughly so you learn a lot about both of these meteor strikes during Earth's recent history. I hope everyone reading this gets the opportunity to see meteor crater.

Other (Other, est. mag -2, est. to be in Canis Major)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Sun Mar 15 23:15:00 2009 UT   Obs. no.: 1818

This evening my brother Anthony, my friends Mike Dzubaty, Steve Borer and I went to the West Haven beach to watch the Space Shuttle roar by us as it went into orbit. The Shuttle was launched at 7:43 PM EDT from Fla. At 7:50 PM EDT we watched the Shuttle go by and as it flew by we were able to see its main engine shutoff occur. We were able to watch it a little while longer before it went out of site heading into orbit. We also trained Steve's 6" Dob on the planet Venus. Venus' crescent is really getting thin and once again we were easily able to see its ashen light. Also we were able to observe dark areas in Venus' cloud bank at its terminator. All of these wonderful events happening on my 40th anniversary of coming home from Vietnam.

Other (Other)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Time: Sun Jan 11 12:00:00 2009 UT   Obs. no.: 1844

When I observe the five naked eye planets I use a telescope. But when I want to observe the earth I can only do it one way and that way is to be in a jet airliner at between 36,000 and 40,000 feet. From cruising altitude you can see there is much cloud cover especially over the oceans. The clouds are often layered at different heights depending on the type of clouds they are. When I flew over land I was amazed at how old looking and run down the Appalachian Mountains are compared to the younger Rocky Mountains. The one thing you can't see is direct evidence of life on Earth although there is plenty of indirect evidence based on being able to see the oceans, clouds and greens of land areas we fly over. The next time you fly, make it a point to make observations of the planet earth. It's fasinating. Now it's back to observing Mars.

Other (Other, est. mag 8, est. to be in Cepheus)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 16-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Milford, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Sat Oct 18 00:45:00 2008 UT   Obs. no.: 1802

Last evening, my friends Steve Borer, Rob Masud, Mike Dzubaty and I went to a local star party in Milford Ct. Among the objects we enjoyed viewing was the garnet star located in Cepheus. Right now the garnet star is at its brightest so its color was a golden orange instead of the red color it shows when it is at its dimmest. I have seen this star when it is at its dimmest and the red color is striking. Try to observe this star if you can because the color is great.

Other (Other, est. mag 2.4, est. to be in Scorpius)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Sun May 25 02:00:00 2008 UT   Obs. no.: 1787

For the past two nights, my friends Mike Dzubaty, Steve Borer and Rob Masud have been observing Delta Scorpii. Several years ago Delta Scorpii flared up tp about 1.6 magnitude. Ever since then Delta Scorpii seems to be dimming at a slow rate. Last year its magnitude dropped to 2.2 but this year we think its magnitude has dropped further to 2.4. We'll be observing this star all summer to see it its magnitude drops further.

Other (Other, est. mag -4)
Observer: Mark D. Schneider (e-mail: markd_s@yahoo.com)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: Garden Grove, California, United States of America
Light pollution: light   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Wed Aug 22 03:20:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1700

Another wonderful ISS sighting from the N to the East where it hit the "dark side".

Other (Other, est. mag -8, est. to be in Hercules)
Observer: Mark D. Schneider (e-mail: markd_s@yahoo.com)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: Garden Grove, California, United States of America
Light pollution: light   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Wed Aug 22 02:58:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1699

This was one of the BEST Flare opportunities afforded to me...CalSky.com predicted it as Iridium 82 and it was STUPENDOUS from this location.

Other (Other, est. mag 5, est. to be in Lyra)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 127-mm other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Wed May 30 13:30:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1661

This evening I observed the double double in Lyra with my 127mm MAK. I was able to split both componants of the double double at 123X with a little difficulty. Each of the individual stars showed itself clearly.

Other (Other, est. mag 2.2, est. to be in Scorpius)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Wed Apr 25 04:45:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1645

Just after midnight I observed the star Delta Scorpii with my naked eye. Several years ago Delta Scorpii was the fourth brightest star in Scorpius when it suddenly flaired to 1.6 magnitude. This made it the second brightest star in Scorpius. About three years ago its magnitude dropped to 2.2 and it remained the second brightest star in Scorpius. Last night its magnitude remained at 2.2 and I'm wondering if it will remain 2.2 for a long time to come. Later around noon time, I observed the sun with my Sunspotter Solar Telescope. Finally a sunspot has just come into view. I think this spot may be fairly large but I'll know in a few days if it is. The sun has been very quiet for several weeks. Maybe now it's becoming active.

Other (Other)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Time: Tue Mar 27 23:30:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1630

Our last meeting of our local astronomy club featured a talk by radio amateur astronomer Joe Wallace. One thing he brought was a lightning detector which detects a type of lightning called whistlers. We tried to detect whistlers but the only thing we got was the static from lightning strikes. He also had a radio telescope that detected anyone who walked in front of it. The volt meter when higher for some peaple than for others. All in all the talk and demonstration were very interesting.

Other (Other, est. to be in Scorpius)
Observer: Dave Mitsky (e-mail: djm28@psu.edu)
Instrument: 42-mm binoculars   Location: Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Sat Feb 24 10:50:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1625

I had my first look at V1280 Scorpii (Nova 2007 Scorpii) this morning just prior to daybreak. Using a 8x42mm Celestron binocular I had no trouble sweeping up the kite-shaped asterism that the nova forms with three field stars situated to the northeast and southeast of Epsilon Scorpii (see the attached Sky & Telescope finder chart). It was too cold and, in particular, windy for me to want to stay outside very long so I didn't try to do a serious magnitude estimate. The "new" star seemed to be similar in brightness to the two stars flanking it, however.

Other (Other, est. to be in Orion)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 50-mm binoculars   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Sun Jan 7 02:30:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1608

Last night, after I returned home from the hockey game, I did a quick observation of Mel 65, 69, and 70, with my 10X50 binoculars. Mel 65 is a large loose star cluster above Orion. The cluster is so large, it does not fit into one binocular field. Mel 69 is actually the head of Orion and it is a nice cluster to view. Mel 70 is is a loose cluster that surrounds the three belt stars of Orion. Any pair of binoculars will reveal these star clusters, even in moonlight.

Other (Other, est. mag -1.8, est. to be in Canis Major)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Thu Dec 28 01:15:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1605

This evening, I viewed what I always refer to as the baseball diamond. As the baseball diamomd rises in the southeast I imagine that I am in the center field bleachers looking past second base towards home plate. So what is the baseball diamond? It starts at Sirius which would be the home plate of the base ball diamond. The batter hits a long homerun into the outfield where I am sitting. He then rounds the bases in his homerun trot, first going by first base which happens to be Procyon. He then continues on his homerun trot to second base which is Betelgeuse. On to third base trots our hero, third base happening to be Rigel. He then rounds third base and heads for home which once again is Sirius. Anyone can imagine the baseball diamond by waiting for Sirius (home plate) Procyon (first base) Betelgeuse (second base) and Rigel (third base) to rise up fairly high in the sky.

Other (Other, est. to be in Orion)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 127-mm other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Tue Dec 12 02:00:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1597

This evening, I observed The Witch Head Nebula with my 127mm MAK. In photographs, the nebula looks just like a witch head. However, to glimpse it with a telescope, I had to aim the scope at the star Rigel. When you do this, you can see some blue nebulosity around Rigel. That is about all you can see of the Witch Head Nebula. Still, it's worth a peak.

Other (Other, est. mag .3, est. to be in Orion)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 127-mm other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: light   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Sat Dec 9 02:00:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1593

My favorite star to study is Betelgeuse located in Orion. I have been estimating Betelgeuse's magnitude every clear night because it is a variable star. Using Aldebaran and Rigel as guide stars, I have estimated Betelgeuse's magnitude to range from .3 magnitude at its brightest to .7 magnitude at its dimmest. I also noticed Betelgeuse's magnitude changes from night to night. Another way I study Betelgeuse is by attaching my Star Spectroscope to my 127mm MAK. I compared Betelgeuse to another old star, Aldebaran to see which star has more spectral lines. Betelgeuse has five spectral lines vs Aldebaran's four spectral lines. This shows Betelgeuse as being both older and cooler in temperature than Aldeberan. To watch Betelgeuse's magnitude become brighter or dimmer from night to night all you have to do is compare its brightness with Aldebaran and Rigel with your own naked eyes. Light pollution will not interfere with your observations.

Other (Other, est. mag 2, est. to be in Taurus)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 127-mm other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Tue Oct 3 03:40:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1568

This evening, I observed the Hyades open star cluster with my 127mm MAK. This cluster is spread out over about five degrees of sky so that even with low power, I could only study sections of the Hyades. Most of the stars of the Hyades seem to be yellow. I was able to observe several wide doubles including one very bright yellow double star. The Hyades are only 88 light years away from us at their closest point. In fact, our sun is considered to be on the fringe of the Hyades open cluster. Finally, I observed the Hyades bright forground star, Aldebaran. Through my scope it had a rich golden color to it.

Other (Other, est. mag 4.5, est. to be in Taurus)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 127-mm other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Thu Sep 21 03:30:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1564

This evening, I observed the Pleiades open star cluster (M45) with my 127mm MAK. The brighter stars of the Pleiades can be seen with nebulosity around them. The higher the power the more you can see the nebula that the Pleiades is traveling through. I also noticed the stars of M45 don't look as blue as they do in binoculars. This is especially true of the Pleiades brighter stars. When I scan around the Pleiades with low power I seem to get a 3D effect with the dimmer stars of the Pleiades. Finally, the color of the nebula did have a bluish tinge to it.

Other (Other)
Observer: Joe Caggiano (e-mail: jcaggiano@mindspring.com, web: http://home.mindspring.com/~jcaggiano/)
Instrument: 6-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Glenside, Pa, USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Mon Jun 19 13:30:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1547

On my previous log, I listed the wrong magnitudes for M16 and M20. In an attempt to addendum my error, M16 is listed as mag. 6.4 and M20 is listed as mag. 9.0.

Other (Other, est. mag 2.2, est. to be in Scorpius)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Fri Jun 16 02:00:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1542

The star Delta Scorpi flared up several years ago. I just checked on the star tonight and it has still not returned to normal brightness. For the last two years, Delta Scorpi has stayed at magnitude 2.2. I will be observing this star some more to see if its magnitude changes.

Other (Other)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
Time: Wed May 10 18:00:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1531

While on vacation in Philadelphia, I was able to behold one of the moon trees that was planted there. One of the Apollo astronauts, Stuart Roosa, remained in orbit around the moon while the other astronauts were on the moon. Roosa brought with him many tree seeds on the lunar voyage. When the seeds were returned to the earth, they were germinated and then planted in selected areas of our country. One of the places was Washington Park in Philadelphia. The Sycamore Tree was planted in May 1975 and is very healty looking. If anyone wants to see if a moon tree is planted near them, you should go to google.com and type in moon trees. There, you will get a list of all the areas were moon trees are planted.

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