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Observations of object "Jupiter":

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.2, est. to be in Leo)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: light   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Thu Feb 12 04:30:00 2004 UT   Obs. no.: 937

This evening, I observed Jupiter at 133X. On the north equitorial belt, were two large festoons. There was a fairly large white oval snuggled in between the festoons. In front of the forward festoon was a white oval that was about half the size of the first white oval mentioned. The forward part of the south equitorial belt seemed to be wider than the section of the SEB that had just rotated onto the face of Jupiter.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.5, est. to be in Leo)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: light   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Thu Jan 29 04:40:00 2004 UT   Obs. no.: 933

Tonight, I observed Jupiter at 133X. The south equitorial belt definately looks wider than the north equitorial belt. This is opposite of other years when the NEB was wider than the SEB. The festooning on the NEB is quite pronounced. As Jupiter gets closer to earth, I am now beginning to glimpse the north temperate belt. The NTB looks like a thin pencil line just north of the NEB. The south polar hood looks two to three times as dark as the north polar hood.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.2, est. to be in Leo)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Tue Dec 30 04:45:00 2003 UT   Obs. no.: 925

This evening, I observerd Jupiter at 133X and 200X. Jupiter was still rather low in the sky. The north equitorial belt seemed to be a little bit thinner than the south equitorial belt. However, the NEB was far more lumpier looking than the SEB due to festooning on the NEB. One other thing, was the south polar hood was very pronounced while the north polar hood was almost invisable.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Wed Sep 24 10:15:00 2003 UT   Obs. no.: 882

This morning, I arose early to observe the conjuction of Jupiter, Mercury and the crescent moon. The earthshine on the moon was as bright as I've ever seen it. At 133X Jupiter's north equitorial belt looked fatter, lumpier and brighter than its south equitorial belt. I was not able to see any other details. I was not able to make out any details of Mercury.Mercury's magnitude appeared to be .5 mag.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.2)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Sat Jun 7 01:00:00 2003 UT   Obs. no.: 820

This evening, at a local star party, a group of us looked at Jupiter at 250X in a 6" dob. The one think that surprised me was the return of the North Temperate Belt. This particular belt had completely faded away several months ago. It has been over a month since I last obsered jupiter, so I don't know exactly when the NTB returned. At the gathering, we also observed M13, M4, the double double, Albereo and M57.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.2, est. to be in Cancer)
Observer: Dave Mitsky (e-mail: djm28@psu.edu)
Instrument: 11-inch refractor   Location: Lancaster, PA, USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: good
Time: Tue May 20 02:00:00 2003 UT   Obs. no.: 814

On the evening of May 19th, 2003, I had the opportunity to watch a shadow transit by Io through an 1884 vintage 11" Clark refractor during a public observing session at the Grundy Observatory. The observatory is located on the Baker Campus of Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania and is open to the public on the third Monday of each month, weather permitting.I also happened to catch Io as it emerged from transiting Jupiter. Later Jerry McClune, the telescope operator, allowed me to train the 11" on the fine binary star Gamma Leonis after first giving me the appropriate instruction.Using the observatory's other instrument, a 16" f/13.5 Boller & Chivens classical Cassegrain, we visitors had views of Saturn, Izar, M49, M104, NGC 3242, M65, M66, M81, and M82. Unfortunately, Lancaster's light polluted skies made the job of discerning any detail in the galaxies difficult, as one might expect. The reflector's massive single-arm mount was equipped with a GOTO drive. Manual input of right ascension and declination was accomplished by setting analog dials. The telescope slewed to objects with surprising speed and accuracy.I certainly enjoyed my visit to the Grundy Observatory. It was great fun to do some observing with yet another large Clark refractor.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.0, est. to be in Cancer)
Observer: Dave Mitsky (e-mail: djm28@psu.edu)
Instrument: 17-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Lewisberry, PA, USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Thu May 15 02:00:00 2003 UT   Obs. no.: 812

I drove to the ASH Naylor Observatory (click on Naylor Observatory at http://www.astrohbg.org ) last night to help out with the spring introductory astronomy class. The class had already done a bit of solar observing with our old orange-tube 8" f/10 Celestron C8 before I arrived. Although the sun was getting fairly low in the sky I took a quick look and saw three smallish sunspots.I sat in on the class until the sky began to darken. I was awarethat a rather rare shadow transit by Callisto was underway and went out to see it through our 12.5" f/6.5 Cave Astrola. The shadow was clearly evident through a 15mm Edmund Scientific RKE (138x). Callisto and Io were closing in on a mutual occultation (see http://skyandtelescope.com/observing/objects/planets/article_771_3.aspfor further information) that eventually occurred at 12:11 a.m. EDT (4:11 UT 5/15).As the students started to filter outside I trained the C8 on Jupiter using a 13mm Tele Vue Ploessl (156x) and then opened the French Dome. The transit was displayed quite nicely at 202x through our 17" f/15 classical Cassegrain and a 32mm University Optics Koenig-II. After the students all had had a turn I increased the magnification to 259x (25mm U.O. MK-70), but the view was a bit soft given the seeing. A 28mm RKE (216x) provided a great view a bit later.We began looking at the 13-day old moon and other objects with the 12.5" Cave, the C8, and our 10" f/7 Cave Astrola. I swung the 12.5" to Saturn and then the 17". A few double stars (Mizar, Castor, and Algieba) were sprinkled in as well. Callisto's shadow reached the CM around 9:00 p.m. EDT (2:00 UT 5/15). Bob Young, the class instructor and the club's resident lunar expert, and I spent a few minutes on the moon (not literally mind you) as some clouds began scudding through. Reiner Gamma ( http://web.tiscali.it/no-redirect-tiscali/themoon/reinergamma.htm ) was a standout feature.So on the first semi-clear night in some time an enjoyable evening of observing occurred despite the bright moonlight and occasional clouds.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.2, est. to be in Cancer)
Observer: Dave Mitsky (e-mail: djm28@psu.edu)
Instrument: 17-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Lewisberry, PA, USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: poor   Seeing: excellent
Time: Fri Apr 25 01:47:00 2003 UT   Obs. no.: 806

I spent about two hours at the ASH Naylor Observatory (http://www.astrohbg.org) last night. The transparency was poor, with high clouds covering a good portion of the sky, but the seeing was very good indeed. Using the 17" f/15 classical Cassegrain I had a fine view of the Great Red Spot transit of the central meridian. The atmosphere was steady enough that I was able to use magnifications as high as 404x (16mm Brandon). Other magnifications employed were 162 (40mm University Optics MK-70), 202 (32mm U.O. Koenig-II), 216 (28mm Edmund Scientific RKE), 259 (25mm U.O. MK-70), and 381x (17mm Pro-Optic Ploessl). The GRS crossed the CM at 9:47 p.m. EDT (1:47 4/25 UT). A dark barge in the North Equatorial Belt followed about half an hour later.Since the early night had not lived up to the forecasts, I didn't look at very much else but I did spend some time viewing Saturn (162 and 216x), Jupiter and M44 through the 5" f/5 finder scope, a few binary and multiple stars, and M67 (162x). I also witnessed a fairly bright flare low in the northeast at 10:48 p.m. (2:28 UT) from Iridium 80.

Jupiter (Planet)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: good
Time: Sat Apr 12 23:30:00 2003 UT   Obs. no.: 801

Just as it was getting dark, I observed Jupiter at 133X and 200X. On the southern edge of the North Equitorial Belt, there was a fairly large white oval just past the meridian. It looked like it was about three fourths as large as the Great Red Spot usually is. I also noticed the South Equitorial Belt was twice as wide before the meridian as it was past meridian. At high power, both polar regions had a touch of pink in them. I never observed that before. I also aimed my dipole antenna toward Jupiter and briefly listened to Jupiter's radio noise before it quickly faded out.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.3, est. to be in Cancer)
Observer: Dave Mitsky (e-mail: djm28@psu.edu)
Instrument: 17-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Lewisberry, PA, USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: excellent
Time: Thu Apr 3 03:33:00 2003 UT   Obs. no.: 799

A number of Astronomical Society of Harrisburg members who gatheredat the Naylor Observatory (http://www.astrohbg.org) were treated to some extremely steady seeing on a very pleasant Wednesday night, 2003/4/3 UT. Those present were Bob Pody, Rob Altenburg, Ted Nichols II, Dave Gaskill, and yours truly. Saturn had its moments through the 17" f/15 classical Cassegrain even though it is slipping closer to the western horizon with each passing day. Viewing Jupiter (162, 202, 216, and 259x), however, was a revelation. The GRS transit of the CM at 3:33 UT was one of the best that I've ever seen. The feature dubbed the "eyebrow" that abuts the GRS was plainly evident as were a barge in the NEB and the disruption in the SEB trailing the GRS. I counted 13 cloud belts and bands. If only the new Stellacam EX that ASH recently purchased had been working properly! (We also missed taping a great pass of the ISS on Tuesday night because of the malfunction.)The GRS was clearly visible through ASH member Bob Pody's 60mmUnitron achromat and a 7mm Pentax orthoscopic. Before that I beheld M42, M37, and M35 through Bob's great little refractor. Naturally enough the 12.5" f/6.5 Cave Newtonian did a fine job onJove at 258x (8mm Brandon). A bit later Rob put asteroid 4 Vesta intoview using the 12.5". Earlier I saw the fine binary star Epsilon Monocerotis and the variable star R Leonis thanks to Rob. One of the many deep-sky objects (including NGC 2362, h3945, M42,M65, M66, and NGC 4565) that I observed with the 17" was thebrightest supernova of this year, 14th magnitude SN 2003cg in NGC3169 (162, 202, 216, and 259x). It looked pretty much the same as it did on Monday night. For more on this recently discoveredsubluminous type Ia exploding star see http://www.rochesterastronomy.org/snimages/The temperature in the French Dome was a balmy 66 degrees Fahrenheit at the end of the session, a far cry from Monday night's low of 29 degrees.

Jupiter (Planet)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Time: Fri Mar 28 23:00:00 2003 UT   Obs. no.: 795

I recently bought a short wave radio in order to try to listen to Jupiter's radio noise. I attached my dipole antenna to it and I tuned in to 21.5. MGH, on the short wave. The forground hiss was loud so I turned the volumne down to see if I could make out the radio noise of Jupiter. After a few minutes, I was able to make out what sounded like waves crashing on to a distant beach coming through the forground hiss. The sound of waves crashing on a distant beach is what Jupiter radio noise sounds like. After a few minutes, the noise stopped and all I had left was the forground hiss on the radio. Also, anyone can hear the Milky Way galaxy noise on 20.5 MGH with the same set up.

Jupiter (Planet)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: fair
Time: Thu Mar 27 23:30:00 2003 UT   Obs. no.: 793

This evening, I observered Jupiter at 133X and 200X. There was a shadow transit, I believe it was Io, crossing Jupiter along the northtern side of the equator. The shadow was very easy to see at 200X. The great red spot was also visable on the south equitorial belt. It still has only a pink tinge to it. I also attached my Star Spectroscope to my dob so I could observe the star Regulus in Leo. It looks like a healthy blue white star with one hydrogen spectral line in it.

Jupiter (Planet)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: fair
Time: Mon Mar 24 23:30:00 2003 UT   Obs. no.: 791

This evening, I observerd Jupiter at 133X. The North Equitorial Belt had a number of festoons on it. The South Eqiutorial Belt also looked like it had festoons on it. It definitely looked more lumpy than it usualy does. The North Temperate Belt, which faded away a few months ago, has not reappeared.

Jupiter (Planet, est. to be in Cancer)
Observer: Dave Mitsky (e-mail: djm28@psu.edu)
Instrument: 17-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Lewisberry, PA, USA
Light pollution: severe   Transparency: poor   Seeing: excellent
Time: Wed Mar 19 03:00:00 2003 UT   Obs. no.: 788

After the ASH advanced astronomy class had ended I watched Io's shadow transit using the 17" f/15 classical Cassegrain at the ASH Naylor Observatory (see http://www.astrohbg.org/gallery/index.php?show=./visit/3b_17_inch.jpg&offset=0).The transparency varied from bad (mostly cloudy) to mediocre but the seeing was excellent. In fact, I was surprised at just how good it was. The shadow of Io was a sharply defined black spot that crept slowly along Jupiter's equator. I was able to push the magnification to as high as 404x (16mm Brandon) but 249x (26mm Tele Vue Ploessl) provided the best overall view. Other magnifications used were 162 (40mm University Optics MK-70), 202 (32mm U.O. Koenig-II), 216 (28mm Edmund Scientific RKE), 259 (25mm MK-70), and 381x (17mm Pro-Optic Ploessl). The size and brightness differences of the Galilean satellites were quite apparent.The shadow crossed the CM at approximately 3:40 UT. About 3 minutes prior to the end of Io's transit, which occurred at 4:01 UT, I could make out the shape of Io as it neared Jupiter's preceding limb. By 4:03 UT Io had pulled far enough away from Jupiter that I could see a gap. As the gap widened the fact that Io was casting its shadow on the cloud tops of its parent planet grew increasingly evident.

Jupiter (Planet)
Observer: Stuie Wilson (e-mail: dudelam@btinternet.com)
Instrument: 8-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Birmingham, West Midlands, UK
Light pollution: severe   Transparency: fair   Seeing: good
Time: Tue Mar 18 20:00:00 2003 UT   Obs. no.: 785

Good viewing tonight. Nice and high in the sky over the UK. Full moon aswell. Managed up to 200x. Nice detail in belts.

Jupiter (Planet)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Wed Jan 22 04:30:00 2003 UT   Obs. no.: 769

Tonight at 133X, I observed the same white oval on the southern edge of the north eqitorial belt that I observed on Jan. 11th. Size wise, it seems to be about the same size as the great red spot, only more roundish in shape. I also still see no sign of the north temperate belt, which disappeared about six weeks ago. The NTB was easy to see last year and the year before.

Jupiter (Planet)
Observer: Gil Young (e-mail: gjyoung@dontspam.cfl.rr.com)
Instrument: 70-mm other   Location: Orlando, Fl, USA
Light pollution: severe   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Fri Jan 17 03:00:00 2003 UT   Obs. no.: 765

Took my scope out for the first time (ETX-70AT) and this was the second object I focused in on (the first one was a house down the block). Was using the 25mm and then the 9mm eyepiece and had a nice view of the planet and three of it's moons.

Jupiter (Planet)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: fair
Time: Thu Jan 16 04:30:00 2003 UT   Obs. no.: 764

Tonight, I was able to view the great red spot at 200X. The color of the spot now has a pink tinge to it. There also was a black dot on the equitorial zone. This was a shadow caused by one of the moons. I also viewed Saturn at 200X. I still think the south polar hood may be lightening up a bit and the hood may be shrinking a little.

Jupiter (Planet)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Sat Jan 11 04:30:00 2003 UT   Obs. no.: 759

Tonight, I observed Jupiter at 133X and 200X. A rather large white oval caught my eye as it traveled along the southern edge of the north equitorial belt. It seemed to fit itself between two festoons on the N.E.B. I also noticed that the north temperate belt has been fading away even though Jupiter getting closer to earth for its Jan. 2nd opposition.Two months ago the N.T.B. was very obvious. The moons Io and Europa were also very close to each other.

Jupiter (Planet)
Observer: John Callender (e-mail: jbc@west.net, web: http://www.west.net/~jbc/)
Instrument: 8-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Carpinteria, CA, USA
Light pollution: light   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: fair
Time: Mon Dec 30 08:45:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 756

I hadn't observed Jupiter through the telescope in a while, and after viewing Saturn through the 25mm eyepiece + 2x Barlow lens, I swung over to Jupiter, which looked gigantic! Three Jovian moons visible, all on one side of the planet. I was getting cold, so I didn't really spend the time to look for detail on the planet. Also, I definitely need to collimate my mirrors. I wonder how that might improve my views at high power.

Jupiter (Planet, est. to be in Cancer)
Observer: Dave Mitsky (e-mail: djm28@psu.edu)
Instrument: 80-mm refractor   Location: Harrisburg , PA, USA
Light pollution: severe   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Wed Dec 18 09:12:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 737

There was a mutual event of the Galilean satellites on this chilly Wednesday morning. From09:12 to 09:16 UT Ganymede partially occulted Io. Io was reduced to15% of its normal brightness.I watched as Ganymede and Io drew close, seemingly merged, and thenwent their separate ways through my Orion ShortTube 80 achromat at 57and 114x using a 7mm Tele Vue Nagler type 6 alone and with a 2xCelestron Ultima Barlow lens.I also briefly viewed the just past opposition Saturn and the nearlyfull moon at 114x.For more on this mutual events "season" see the article by Jean Meeus in the December "Sky & Telescope" and on the Sky & Telescope web site (http://skyandtelescope.com/printable/observing/objects/planets/article_774.asp). There is a similar article by Richard Talcott in the December issue of "Astronomy".

Jupiter (Planet)
Observer: Paul (e-mail: paul_ohstbucks@msn.com)
Instrument: 12.5-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Kansas City, MO, USA
Light pollution: severe   Transparency: good   Seeing: fair
Time: Sun Dec 15 05:00:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 733

Well, with a bright moon in the sky, Jupiter sounded like as good as any target. I was surprised to see a moon in transit accross the planet. I never noticed one before, so it was a pleasant surpise. Early in the evening while Jupiter was still low in the sky, I noticed 3 of the prominent moons just to the west of Jupiter. Later in the evening, one was missing. At 59x, it wasn't really detectable, but increasing magnification to 157x, the small black dot just north of the southern belt was clearly seen. From my perspective, as the evening wore on, it was transiting from right to left accross the planet as the evening wore on. Quite a fun find.......

Jupiter (Planet)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: light   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Wed Dec 4 05:15:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 729

This evening I observed Jupiter at 133x. The great red spot is now beginning to take on a pinkish shade to it. It still has a tiny black dot in the center of the red spot. I also noticed the north equitorial belt is now much more pronounced than the south equitorial belt is. Last week both belts seemed about equal. I also observed Saturn at 200x. Saturn now has a white spot on it that several observers, including my friend Joe Cseh has seen. So far, I have not seen this white spot but I will keep looking for it. The one thing I do notice about Saturn is its south polar hood is much darker this year than I have ever seen it in all the years I have observed Saturn.

Jupiter (Planet)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Wed Oct 9 09:15:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 692

This morning,I was able to observe the great red spot of Jupiter. The spot had only an ashy grey color to it. I also noticed a tiny black dot in the middle of it. I also was able to observe the shadow of either Io or Europa just to the left of the great red spot as seen in a newtonian reflecter. Once again, the north equitorial belt was loaded with festoons, but unlike last year it looks smaller than the south equitorial belt.

Jupiter (Planet)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: fair
Time: Wed Sep 18 09:15:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 686

This morning, at 133X, I noticed that the south equitorial belt was wider than the north equitorial belt. However, the NEB had a number of festoons on it. It looked very lumpy. The north temperate belt showed quite well this morning. Finally, the south polar hood was much brighter than the north polar hood.

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