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Observations of object "Jupiter":

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.2, est. to be in Virgo)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: East Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Fri Jun 30 15:30:00 2017 UT   Obs. no.: 2010

Last evening, my co-worker Suezie & I got to view the conjunction of Jupiter & the moon as we left work. They were about three degrees apart. As an added touch, there was lightning from a distant thunderstorm also. It was quite a sky show.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.2)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 40-mm binoculars   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Mon Jun 12 01:30:00 2017 UT   Obs. no.: 2008

This evening, my brother Anthony, my friend Joe & I saw the ISS pass directly over our heads. We then mounted our binoculars on a mount to view the heavens. We first looked at Jupiter & we were able to see 3 of its moons in the mounted binos. We also were able to see the rings of Saturn. In Scorpio, we were barely able to see M4 but the biggest thrill was we were able to get the smudge of Comet Johnson on Anthony's camera even though we couldn't see the comet ourselves with our mounted binoculars. We ended the evening by watching a blood red moon rise. We had a very enjoyable evening.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.7, est. to be in Virgo)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 127-mm other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: fair
Time: Tue Apr 18 00:45:00 2017 UT   Obs. no.: 2004

This evening, My brother Anthony & I observed Jupiter with our 5" MAK & 12'5 Televue eyepiece. Three belts were visible on Jupiter's face. The North Equitorial Belt was big & very lumpy looking with its festoons. The South Equitorial Belt was also obvious & smooth. The big surprise was how pronounced the South Temperate Belt was. It's been many years since I saw that belt that easily. All four of Jupiter's moons were out with three on one side & one moon on the other side. We also had the pleasure of simply looking at Jupiter & Spica which was below Jupiter with our naked eyes.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.5, est. to be in Virgo)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Mon Apr 10 03:00:00 2017 UT   Obs. no.: 2003

This evening I saw the moon & Jupiter about 5 or 6 degrees apart in the south. Spica was also nearby.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.5, est. to be in Libra)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 50-mm binoculars   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Mon Apr 3 02:15:00 2017 UT   Obs. no.: 2002

This evening I observed Jupiter with a 7th magnitude star about a quarter of a degree above the planet. I also was able to see two moons near Jupiter as well a Spica below Jupiter. It was a nice little gathering.

Jupiter (Planet)
Observer: Mark D. Schneider (e-mail: markd_s@yahoo.com)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: Garden Grove, California, United States of America
Light pollution: light   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Sat Aug 6 03:00:30 2016 UT   Obs. no.: 1979

above the Moon was a nice sight.

Jupiter (Planet, est. to be in Leo)
Observer: Mark D. Schneider (e-mail: markd_s@yahoo.com)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: Garden Grove, California, United States of America
Light pollution: light   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Wed Feb 24 03:50:30 2016 UT   Obs. no.: 1966

the Moon was passing low in the East...a nice sight.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.5)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: fair
Time: Mon Mar 10 00:30:00 2014 UT   Obs. no.: 1903

This evening I observed a nice conjunction between Jupiter & the moon. They were about two degrees apart & it was a great sight.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.5)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Wed Jan 15 02:55:00 2014 UT   Obs. no.: 1901

This evening I observed Jupiter & the moon about 5 degrees apart in the sky. It was a nice sight.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.4)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: Milford, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Thu Dec 19 04:10:00 2013 UT   Obs. no.: 1900

Tonight I observed the nice conjunction of the moon & Jupiter. They were about three degrees apart.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Fri Oct 25 03:00:00 2013 UT   Obs. no.: 1897

This evening I watched Jupiter & the moon rise together. They were about six degrees apart with Jupiter lower left of the moon.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 127-mm other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Sat Oct 6 04:40:00 2012 UT   Obs. no.: 1884

I observed Jupiter with my 127 MAK & 12MM Televue Eyepiece. I recently read an article how Jupiter's North Equitorial Belt has grown bigger & wider so I checked it out myself. The NEB is the largest that I've ever seen it. It's much bigger & brighter than the South Equitorial Belt. Also, The North Temperate Belt is much brighter this year than in other years. I would guess that something going on in Jupiter's northern hemisphere is allowing both the NEB & NTB to show brightly.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag =2.9, est. to be in Pisces)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 8-inch refractor   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Wed Oct 13 01:15:00 2010 UT   Obs. no.: 1860

This evening, I along with my brother Anthony and my friends Steve Borer and Mike Recchia took a ride to Yale's Leitner Observatory to observe the sky with their 8" refractor. We observed Jupiter and still its South Equitorial Belt is mostly gone. We also observed M31, M57, the double double and Albreo. We also enjoyed a nice planetatium show. It was a perfect night indeed.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.9, est. to be in Pisces)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 127-mm other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Sat Oct 9 01:30:00 2010 UT   Obs. no.: 1859

Last evening, during halftime of the UCONN vs Rutgers football game, I observed Jupiter and Uranus with my 127mm MAK. Jupiter's North Equitorial belt and The North temperate Belt were very prominent last night with festoons appearing on the NEB. The South Equitorial Belt is still almost invisible with only a trace amount showing. I can't see the South Temperate Belt at all. Finally, the South Polar Hood is more pronounced than The North Polar Hood. As for Uranus, all I can see is a plain white disc with no sign of its usual bluegreen color. Thus the disapearance of Jupiter's SEB and the disapearance of Uranus' bluegreen color continue to baffle me.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.9, est. to be in Capricornus)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 127-mm other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Wed Sep 15 02:15:00 2010 UT   Obs. no.: 1856

Last evening, my brother Anthony and I observed Jupiter and Uranus with my 127mm MAK. The South Equitorial Belt remains almost invisible although we can faintly see it below the high thin cirrus clouds that have covered it. This convinces me the SEC is intact and will show itself as soon as the cirrus clouds above it break up. The North Equirorial Belt is showing some festoons on it and we were also able to see the North Temperate Belt. Once again Uranus' disc seemed devoid of color compared to other years when it was a blue green color. Finally with binoculars, we observd M31 and its companion galaxy M110. It proved to be a very enjoyable night.

Jupiter (Planet)
Observer: Dan (e-mail: starmandan@hotmail.com)
Instrument: 6-inch refractor   Location: Waco, Texas, USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: good
Time: Sun Aug 29 03:30:00 2010 UT   Obs. no.: 1854

Jupiter at 133x, low on the horizon (less than 30* high). This was my first observation of the planet since superior conjunction. Many belts were observed. Minus the SEB of course. A dark feature was prominent within the NEB. Due to the low altitude, smaller details were not obvious. All four moons were observed, two on each side with one outer moon set apart above the plane of the others as if it had just come around from the backside of the planet.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.5, est. to be in Capricornus)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 127-mm other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Fri Jul 30 04:45:00 2010 UT   Obs. no.: 1853

Early this morning I observed Jupiter and Uranus with my 127mm MAK. The first thing I saw on Jupiter was the absence of the South Equitorial Belt which disappeared some months ago. The North Equitorial Belt is still easily visible. I may have glimpsed the South Temperate Belt which means the high cirrus clouds may be covering the SEB only. I also observed Uranus which is currently three degrees west of Jupiter. It presented a nice disc in my scope. Earlier in the evening my friend Steve and I viewed the gathering of Mars, Saturn and Venus in the western sky. Venus was white, Saturn was yellow amd Mars was orange and this presented a nice contrast in the sky. Finally, I looked down and saw the earth which brought my total planet count for the overnight period to six. Very enjoyable.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.4, est. to be in Capricornus)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 127-mm other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Thu Oct 29 23:30:00 2009 UT   Obs. no.: 1835

Last evening I observed Jupiter with my 127mm MAK and 12mm Televue Eyepiece. When I put the scope on Jupiter, I found Jupiter's moon Io right next to Jupiter. After watching for 15 Minutes, Io disappeared behind Jupiter. I haven't seen that happen in a long time.

Jupiter (Planet)
Observer: Bryan Hollingsworth (e-mail: hollingsworth.bryan@yahoo.com)
Instrument: 60-mm other   Location: Colorado Springs, Colorado, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Thu Aug 20 05:00:00 2009 UT   Obs. no.: 1831

Took a look at Jupiter through the Spotting Scope last night. Was able to observe the four moons. This is my first real observation, being that I am new to astronomy. I have to say, I am really enjoying it. I obsereved three shiny dots on the right side of the planet, and one shiny dot on the left. I am assuming that these were the moons. Feel free to send me an email explaining this. Any input would be greatly appreciated.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.8, est. to be in Capricornus)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: good
Time: Fri Aug 14 02:30:00 2009 UT   Obs. no.: 1830

This evening my friend Steve Borer and I observed Jupiter through Steve's 6" Dob. Besides the North and South Equitorial Belts, the South Temperate belt was very easily seen. It now looks like a pencil line across the southern hemisphere of Jupiter. We were also able to observe the great red spot. I think the scientific community should call it the great tan spot because it looks so tan. This was my first view of the GRS this year and I hope to observe it again very soon.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.7, est. to be in Capricornus)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 127-mm other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: good
Time: Fri Jul 10 03:00:00 2009 UT   Obs. no.: 1827

Last evening I observed Jupiter with my 127mm MAK and 12mm Televue eyepiece. The first thing I noticed was the South Equitorial Belt was split in two just like rail tracks. The rail track effect occurs in one section of the SEB and this has been going on for a number of years. On the North Equitorial Belt there were a number of Festoons on it. The NEB also looks darker than the SEB. The North Temperate Belt is quite easy to see and it looks like a pencil line going across. I also noticed the South Polar Hood is very extensive and dark. This contrasts with the North Polar Hood as being pale and small in area coverage. In addition to three of Jupiter's moons being visible, the 5th magnitude star Mu Capricorni was close by and added to the scene. Finally, because of the close proximity of the moon, I was not able to observe Neptune which is close to Jupiter this month. Once the moon is out of the way, I will be able to also observe Neptune also.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.7, est. to be in Sagittarius)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 127-mm other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Tue Jul 22 03:30:00 2008 UT   Obs. no.: 1795

Last evening I observed Jupiter with my 127mm MAK. I was able to observe the red spot for the first time this year. Sizewise, it looks larger than last year and I wonder if it's the result of its merger between it and the two other smaller red spots. The GRS also had a slight tannish tinge to it. I also looked at Jupiter's largest moon Gamymede. Its disc is quite orangy looking and I think on a night of great seeing I will try to see some albedo features on Gamymede. Last night seeing precluded me from attemting to see albedo features.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.4, est. to be in Sagittarius)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Sun Jul 13 01:45:00 2008 UT   Obs. no.: 1794

Last night my friend Steve Borer and I turned his scope on Jupiter while it was low in the sky. Jupiter's moons were two seperate close binaries on one side of the moon. Two of the moons were close to the planet and the other two were farther away from Jupiter. This was my first view of Jupiter's four moons forming two pairs of close binaries on one side of the planet. You never know what to expect when you point your telescope at Jupiter.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.2, est. to be in Sagittarius)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 127-mm other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: excellent
Time: Wed Jul 9 04:45:00 2008 UT   Obs. no.: 1792

Very early this morning my weather station showed my temperature to be 74 degrees with the due point around 70 degrees and my skies were quite hazy. This kind of weather is perfect for planetary viewing. With this in mind I observed Jupiter with my 127mm MAK with a Teleview 12.5mm eyepiece. This was one of my five best views of Jupiter of all time. First the north equitorial belt was lumpy because festoons were traveling across it. The south equitorial belt was smoother and fainter but the SEB split in two halfway across the face of Jupiter. It looked like a railroad track. It was also easy to see both the north and south temperate belts. These belts were thinner and fainter than the two main belts of Jupiter. Jupiter's four moons all clearly resolved themselves as discs. Finally, back on Jupiter, the north polar hood seemed more pronounced than the south polar hood.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.2, est. to be in Ophiuchus)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 10-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: severe   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Sun Aug 26 01:00:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1701

This evening my friends Mike Dzubaty, Steve Borer and I observed Jupiter with Steve's 10" Dob. The South Equitorial Belt is still very difficult to see. However, the South Temperate Belt was easily seen through our scope. Both the North and South Polar Hoods seemed to be fading because Jupiter is receding from the Earth. Finally, all four of Jupiter's moons showed their discs nicely.

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