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Observations of object "M31 (Andromeda Galaxy)":

M31 (Andromeda Galaxy) (Galaxy, in Andromeda)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 50-mm binoculars   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Sun Oct 3 01:15:00 2010 UT   Obs. no.: 1858

This evening my friend, Joe Cseh and I tried to observe Comet Hartley 2 with Joe's mounted 16X50 binoculars. To our dismay, we utterly and completely failed to pick the comet out. After recovering from our shock, we turned Joe's binos on M31, The Andromeda Galaxy. At 16X we were able to pick out the starlike core in the center of the galaxy. The rest of the galaxy fanned out nicely. The Double cluster also looked great but at 16X, we had to view each cluster seperately. We then turned his mounted binos on Jupiter and Uranus. Three of Jupiter's moons were on one side of the planet and the other one was on the other side of the planet. When we pointed the binos on Uranus neither of us was able to see any color on Uranus. This has been on going since I started observing Uranus about two months ago. Every other year I was able to see a blue green color on Uranus but not this year with either a telescope or binoculars. Finally for a laugh, we tried to look at Uranus with our naked eye and we both had no trouble seeing Uranus with our naked eyes.

M31 (Andromeda Galaxy) (Galaxy, in Andromeda)
Observer: Joe Caggiano (e-mail: jcaggiano@mindspring.com, web: http://home.mindspring.com/~jcaggiano/)
Instrument: 10-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Glenside, Pa, USA
Light pollution: light   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: good
Time: Sun Aug 12 06:20:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1696

Massive at both 30x and 48x. The core was bright with hints of the spiral structure. M32 was also bright as a large hazy star just a few arcminutes away.

M31 (Andromeda Galaxy) (Galaxy, in Andromeda)
Observer: Joe Caggiano (e-mail: jcaggiano@mindspring.com, web: http://home.mindspring.com/~jcaggiano/)
Instrument: 10-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Glenside, Pa, USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: fair
Time: Sun Aug 5 05:30:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1688

Viewed the Andromeda Galaxy last night for the first time with the new scope. Even though it's location was still fairly low in the east with a good deal of light pollution, I spied more detail than I could in more ideal conditions with my old 6". Also, M32 was much more apparent too. Viewed through a 40mm ep for 30x.

M31 (Andromeda Galaxy) (Galaxy, in Andromeda)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 25-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Sat Sep 23 03:00:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1565

This weekend, I attended the Connecticut Star Party. While most of the weekend was clouded out, we did have a two hour window of clear skies on Friday night to observe some deep space objects. The largest telescope at the star party was a 25" Dob and that is what I looked through. We observed Galaxies M31 and M32. M31 has a bright central core which can be seen, even with the naked eye. We were able to see one dust lane and the outer halo of the galaxy with no trouble. M32 is a satellite of M31 and it is a small eliptical galaxy. We also observed three small ngc galaxies which were very hard to see. We also observed four nebulas, including The Crab, Dumbell, Little Dumbell and the Blinking Nebula. The Crab Nebula was difficult to see but the glow from it was obvious. We couldn't see any detail. Both the Dumbell Nebulas showed quite well and their dumbell shapes were obvious. The Blinking Nebula is a star with a small area of blue nebula around it. The star appeared to be blinking to all who observed it. Finally, we observed open clusters M36, M37 and M38. Both M36 and M38 filled the scope with beautiful stars while M37 showed many stars in a small compact area. Alas, the clouds then returned.

M31 (Andromeda Galaxy) (Galaxy, in Andromeda)
Observer: mihai mataringa (e-mail: mihaimataringa@yahoo.com)
Instrument: 7x50-mm binoculars   Location: constanta(obs.location:Prilipeti,Romania), romania
Light pollution: none   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Fri Aug 18 21:25:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1587

The central core of M31 clearly visible as a bright patch,a little prolonged.The oval halo around it stretches about one third of the field of view(witch is approx.6degrees).A very nice view this night being done the good sky conditions.My first observation of M33(galaxy in Triangulum) was a little difficult,but i find it considering the distance between beta And-M31,witch is approx.equal with that of betaAnd-M33 in the opposite direction.This distance is about the diameter of my 7x50 binos field of view.M33 appears like a fuzzy patch ,not very bright without visible central core,more easily detected by peripheral vision and with small movements of the instrument. (

M31 (Andromeda Galaxy) (Galaxy, in Andromeda)
Observer: Luis Drags (e-mail: nst@yahoo.co.uk, web: http://www.geocities.com/night_sky_tome)
Instrument: equatorial reflector   Location: No location given
Time: Thu Jan 12 23:23:23 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1539

Large!! actually make that enormous! The bright core is a large ball of stars at the center with the oval halo reaching far past either edge of the field even at the lowest power (60x, 1deg), extended northeast-southwest, a dark rift separates a spiral arm along the southeastern edge, M32 and M110 flank the core above and below

M31 (Andromeda Galaxy) (Galaxy, in Andromeda)
Observer: Andrew Cooper (e-mail: acooper@pobox.com, web: http://www.siowl.com/)
Instrument: 46-cm Dobsonian reflector   Location: TIMPA, near Tucson, Arizona, United States
Light pollution: light   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Sun Aug 28 07:21:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1297

Large!! actually make that enormous! The bright core is a large ball of stars at the center with the oval halo reaching far past either edge of the field even at the lowest power (60x, 1deg), extended northeast-southwest, a dark rift separates a spiral arm along the southeastern edge, M32 and M110 flank the core above and below

M31 (Andromeda Galaxy) (Galaxy, in Andromeda)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 17.5-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Colbrook, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: none   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Sun Aug 28 02:30:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1288

My friends Steve Borer, Mike Dzubaty and I spent the weekend camping in the northwest hills of Connecticut. On Saturday evening, we set up Mike's 17.5" dob for some observing before the expected cloud cover arrived. For Galaxies, we started off observing M31. In the jet black skies of the northwest hills, M31 showed more than just its core. The spiral effect was very obvious. One of its satellite galaxies M110, also looks like a smaller version of a spiral galaxy even though it is not considered to be a spiral. M32 is a brighter yet smaller satellite galaxy. As the clouds rushed in, I had time to observe M33 with my binoculars. The face on galaxy filled almost half my field of view. Earlier in the evening, we started to observe globular clusters. M4 looks almost like an open cluster. There seems to be a line of stars that runs in the middle of it. M22 is very impressive with a lot of individual stars seen. M13 is a little more impressive, also with a lot of individual stars seen. For some reason, in binoculars, M22 is much more impressive than M13. For that matter, even M4 is a better binocular object than M13. I don't understand why this is. For open clusters, M6,7,21,& 24 are outstanding, whether in the telescope or binoculars. M8, the Lagoon nebula, shows a cluster of stars on one side and nebulosity on the other side. It is also a great binocular item. The nebulosity in M 20, the Trifid nebula, showed its classic dust lanes within the nebula. Finally M17, the Omega nebula, could be seen amidst a cluster of stars. Finally, the milky way itself was beautiful. The great rift was very obvious. Scanning the milky way with my binoculars netted me M11 and the coathanger star cluster.

M31 (Andromeda Galaxy) (Galaxy, in Andromeda)
Observer: Akarsh Simha (e-mail: akarsh_simha@fastmail.fm)
Instrument: 8-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: good
Time: Fri Jun 10 15:00:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1321

The well known and very bright M31 is impressive even on such cloudy days. Even near the horizon, it is easy to observe. Central brightness and surrounding haze is clearly seen. It is elongated. The nearby M110 also offers a beautiful sight!

M31 (Andromeda Galaxy) (Galaxy, in Andromeda)
Observer: Emil Neata (e-mail: forvert2000@yahoo.com, web: http://www.astroclubul.org/emilneata)
Instrument: 60-mm refractor   Location: Craiova, Romania
Light pollution: light   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Tue Jan 25 00:00:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1167

M 31 - The elongated shape is visible even with the naked eye. The galaxy is very large, it doesn’t fit in the eyepiece field.

M31 (Andromeda Galaxy) (Galaxy, in Andromeda, Est. RaDec 60)
Observer: Joe Caggiano (e-mail: jcaggiano@mindspring.com)
Instrument: 6-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Horsham, Pa., USA
Light pollution: severe   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: fair
Time: Wed Oct 6 02:00:00 2004 UT   Obs. no.: 1070

Lots of zodiac/light pollution from all directions up to about 30 degrees. Found M31 easy enough as it won it's battle against the light. Oddly enough, tonight was easy spotting the larger of its 2 companions, and M32 was in a perpendicular position to the Andromedan Galaxy, at about the 11:00 position (as judged by my perspective through the eyepiece). The core of M31 was not as large and definable as it was the other night but still easily visible. Afterwards, I tried yet again for M33, but fell short of my goal. Giving up on the pinwheel I moved my attention back to M57. (see M57 observations) before heading back in.

M31 (Andromeda Galaxy) (Galaxy, in Andromeda, Est. RaDec varies w/ object)
Observer: Joe Caggiano (e-mail: jcaggiano@mindspring.com)
Instrument: 6-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Horsham, Pa., USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Mon Oct 4 02:00:00 2004 UT   Obs. no.: 1063

Decided to use my Celestron 15x70 Skymaster Binos due to having company over and did not have the 6" reflector cooled down. M31 was easily visible and the core looked very well. Tried to locate Triangulum (M33) but could not due to it's diffuse nature and the impending light from Philadelphia. The Double Cluster also was very obvious and the amount of stars in the FOV is always overwhelming to me. M13 was rather faint in the binos. The cluster was about the size of the full moon is to the naked eye. Very faint and could see only the core when looking around the edges of the FOV and not straight on. M29 was also conspicuous in Cygnus but I always am drawn to the populated star field rather than M29 itself. I missed out on M57. Right at the apex point at the time of me going to bed. This morning at 0600 EST when I awoke, Venus and M42 were out but I did not have a chance before getting ready for work. Perhaps tomorrow.

M31 (Andromeda Galaxy) (Galaxy, in Andromeda)
Observer: Sriram.M.Gubbi (e-mail: sriram_gubbi@yahoo.co.in)
Instrument: 50-mm refractor   Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Sun Jun 20 04:30:00 2004 UT   Obs. no.: 1193

This is one of the most difficult objects to see even from naked eye on a dark sky and with telescope,a cat's eye must be there.i was really thrilled to see the galaxy thruough my telescope for the first time on a cold midnight of autumn. (for my luck only that time of the night was clear)

M31 (Andromeda Galaxy) (Galaxy, in Andromeda)
Observer: John Callender (e-mail: jbc@west.net, web: http://www.west.net/~jbc/)
Instrument: 8-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Carpinteria, CA, USA
Light pollution: light   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: fair
Time: Tue Dec 10 06:00:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 739

The Andromeda Galaxy was fairly easily to the naked eye in the extremely clear skies following a winter storm. I observed it, and its companion, under a variety of powers in the 8-inch.

M31 (Andromeda Galaxy) (Galaxy, in Andromeda)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: binoculars   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: none   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Sun Mar 17 00:00:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 630

In 10x50 binoculars m31 has a bright core. the wings seem to extend very far from the core.

M31 (Andromeda Galaxy) (Galaxy, in Andromeda)
Observer: Sean Wilkins (e-mail: peggy@eriecoast.com)
Instrument: 4.5-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Elyria, Ohio, Usa
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Mon Oct 25 03:45:00 1999 UT   Obs. no.: 492

Very good transperancy.Right there in the Eastern part of the sky.

M31 (Andromeda Galaxy) (Galaxy, in Andromeda)
Observer: Mike Pierce (e-mail: xtozaj@webtv.net)
Instrument: 10x50-mm binoculars   Location: Malone, Florida, USA
Light pollution: light   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Fri Oct 9 02:30:00 1998 UT   Obs. no.: 403

Observed Pegasus rising and with it a wonderful observation of M31, the Andromeda Galaxy. Observed it with 10x50 binos due to its altitude. Noted a wonderful "dusky spot" in the heavens. Obviously, a galactic sighting. Will endeavor to locate same in the future earlier in the evening, so that I can put my scope and some power on this beauty! Don't miss this early fall asterism! P.S. Ain't astronomy grand!!?

M31 (Andromeda Galaxy) (Galaxy, in Andromeda)
Observer: Harold Williams (e-mail: clouseau@webtv.net)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Light pollution: light   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Thu Sep 24 03:30:00 1998 UT   Obs. no.: 402

I was camping in the Berkshire Mountains of western Massachusetts this week and was fortunate to experience sky conditions that are rare for most people. The only light was from a few distant houses, my propane lamp on low and a campfire. I was looking through Andromeda to locate the galaxy to view it with my new ETX. I noticed a faint haze where it should be but couldn't believe I would see it naked eye. After a few minutes of checking with the binoculars, I decided it was possible. Also visible with no help was the Double Cluster in Perseus. The Milky Way was distinct all the way from Sagittarius to Cassiopeia. Just scanning along this line with binoculars and just observing star fields was amazing.

M31 (Andromeda Galaxy) (Galaxy, in Andromeda)
Observer: Mark Stutzman (e-mail: mark@cca.ci.coatesville.pa.us)
Instrument: 4 1/2-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Gilbertsville, PA, usa
Light pollution: light   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Tue Aug 18 03:00:00 1998 UT   Obs. no.: 379

Had very good views of one of our nearest galactic neighbors last night. companion was visible to me as well. very bright center and fuzzy surrounding area took up half my view in 25mm eyepiece.

M31 (Andromeda Galaxy) (Galaxy, in Andromeda, Est. RaDec 0.42.7/+41.16)
Observer: Joe Muse (e-mail: jmuse@bigfoot.com, web: http://www.geocities.com/capecanaveral/3185)
Instrument: 16-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Roswell, NM, USA
Light pollution: none   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Wed Oct 29 14:00:00 1997 UT   Obs. no.: 238

Nice! Used a 40mm eyepiece

M31 (Andromeda Galaxy) (Galaxy in Andromeda)
Observer: John Callender (e-mail: jbc@west.net, web: http://www.west.net/~jbc/)
Instrument: 50-mm binoculars   Location: Carpinteria, CA, USA
Light pollution: none   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: fair
Time: Mon Jan 6 04:55:00 1997 UT   Obs. no.: 4

Huge and stunning. The central condensation was obvious to the naked eye, while in the 7x50s the outer arms extended across half the 7-degree field.

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