anthropocenesketchbook:My interpretive sign is up at Stebbins…

Tuesday, October 9th, 2018

anthropocenesketchbook:

My interpretive sign is up at Stebbins Cold Canyon Reserve! The sign shows how a seasonal stream interacts with plants and animals year-round. I’ve included some sketches from the development of the sign. #interpretivesign #sciart #stebbinscoldcanyon #stebbinscoldcanyonreserve #ucnaturalreserve #ucnaturalreservesystem #coldcreek #seasonalstream
https://www.instagram.com/p/BouvNQPAILK/?utm_source=ig_tumblr_share&igshid=6t1db0xv3iux

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/178901182151.

orangepenguino: thegetty: Art Under the Microscope: Threads How…

Friday, April 28th, 2017


This photomicrograph shows the warp and weft threads used to create a background detail in the Triumph of Bacchus tapestry


Triumph of Bacchus, design overseen by Raphael, ca. 1518-19; design and cartoon by Giovanni da Udine. Brussels, workshop of Frans Geubels, ca 1560. Paris, Mobilier National, inv. GMTT 1/3. Image © Le


The horizontal threads are the undyed wool warps that are the backbone of the underlying weave structure to the tapestry.


The decorative vertical threads include both crimson colored silk wefts as well as precious metal weft threads

orangepenguino:

thegetty:

Art Under the Microscope: Threads

How exactly was the gilding of tapestries done in the 16th century? These microscopic images reveal all.  

These images show the warp and weft threads used to create a background detail in the Triumph of Bacchus tapestry recently exhibited in “Woven Gold: Tapestries of Louis XIV.” 

Viewed from a distance (like when the tapestry is hanging high up on a wall), the combo of the crimson silk with the gold threads looks like a bright copper, and here we can see all the separate colors and textures that build up that look.


Triumph of Bacchus, design overseen by Raphael, ca. 1518-19; design and cartoon by Giovanni da Udine. Brussels, workshop of Frans Geubels, ca 1560. Paris, Mobilier National, inv. GMTT 1/3.  Image © Le Mobilier National. Photo by Lawrence Perquis


Art Under the Microscope is a series that features, well, art under the microscope, as photographed by our conservators to better study and preserve our collections.

Hey @tawnypixie

Reposted from http://ift.tt/2pHQEyi.