renatagrieco: June 28, 2018 – Crescent-chested Warbler…

Thursday, August 9th, 2018

renatagrieco:

June 28, 2018 – Crescent-chested Warbler (Oreothlypis superciliosa)

These warblers are found in parts of Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, and Nicaragua. They eat insects and other invertebrates, picking their prey from foliage, often foraging in mixed-species flocks. Their cup-shaped nests are constructed from mosses, grass, hair, and sometimes pine needles, on or near the ground. Females incubate the eggs alone, but both parents feed the chicks.

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/176824550707.

birdandmoon: An American Redstart hanging out in some willows.

Wednesday, July 18th, 2018

birdandmoon:

An American Redstart hanging out in some willows.

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/176022830334.

birdandmoon: I got to visit a bird banding station, and… this…

Friday, June 15th, 2018

birdandmoon:

I got to visit a bird banding station, and… this happened.

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/174929879335.

snailkites: Kirtland’s Warbler doodle in Autodesk Sketchbook….

Friday, June 15th, 2018

snailkites:

Kirtland’s Warbler doodle in Autodesk Sketchbook. I’ve been pecking away (hah) at this for over a month but probably won’t “finish” it. Maybe if I had a stylus for my phone!

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/174922571468.

snailkites: Fancy new logo for my bird club!

Tuesday, December 13th, 2016

snailkites:

Fancy new logo for my bird club!

Reposted from http://ift.tt/2hLrxCr.

snailkites: Black-throated Blue Warbler (Setophaga…

Sunday, November 13th, 2016

snailkites:

Black-throated Blue Warbler (Setophaga caerulescens)

Warm-up for Inktober 2016! 

I refilled an old fountain pen for this piece and got ink all over my hands, kitchen, and body in the process. In the end, I decided I prefer using my Chinese painting brushes to the fountain pen, but it was worth a shot!

Reposted from http://ift.tt/2eQUaMI.

renatagrieco: December 21, 2015 – Red Warbler (Cardellina…

Wednesday, February 3rd, 2016

renatagrieco:

December 21, 2015 – Red Warbler (Cardellina rubra)

Requested by: @gepwin

These warblers are found only in three mountain ranges in Mexico, on the edges of pine-oak forests. Often foraging in pairs, they eat insects, picking them from surfaces or catching them in the air. Males become very territorial during the breeding season, singing and challenging rivals nearby. Females build cup or oven-shaped nests on the ground from grass, pine needles, and other plant materials, where they incubate three or four eggs.

Reposted from http://ift.tt/1NQEaUN.

kaitlin-murphy: In the fall of 2014, I worked as a banding…

Thursday, December 10th, 2015

kaitlin-murphy:

In the fall of 2014, I worked as a banding intern at Point Reyes Bird Observatory, also known as Palomarin Field Station and overseen by Point Blue Conservation Science. Somehow while juggling a full-time banding schedule, studying for the bander’s certification exam, and hunting for my next job, I taught myself how to work with opaque watercolors and painted this poster for the banding lab/visitor’s center. It features all the species who breed further north and migrate to Palomarin in decent numbers for the winter (with the exceptions of Sharp-shinned Hawk, which breed in smaller numbers than are seen during migration and winter; and Wrentit, who are year-round residents, unique to the Pacific coast, and are just so g.d. charming that I couldn’t resist including). I am grateful to Steve N.G. Howell for his advice, encouragement and inexorable standards of accuracy – to which I surely failed.  Original dimensions 22×30″ on cold-press watercolor paper.

Reposted from http://ift.tt/1U9fH2P.

snailkites: American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla) The…

Monday, November 16th, 2015

snailkites:

American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla)

The American Redstart is a coal-black warbler with vibrant orange patches. Fittingly for its Halloween color scheme, it catches insects by spooking them: a quick flash of its bright fanned tail flushes prey from nearby branches.
Males are polygamous, keeping two mates in nearby but nonadjacent territories.
Pictured are an adult male and a first-year male (or a female). The first-year males are commonly called “yellowstarts” because of their lighter plumage.

Reposted from http://ift.tt/1WWsfPZ.

sylvia-morris: Can’t focus on what I’m meant to be drawing so…

Thursday, September 10th, 2015

sylvia-morris:

Can’t focus on what I’m meant to be drawing so here’s a lil bird.

I _love_ him! Seeing photos of the male splendid fairy-wren in breeding plumage is one of best things that’s happened to me on tumblr, but seeing your art of him is even better.

Have you ever seen one IRL? It sounds like they tend to hang out in arid habitats and have been displaced by urban/suburban encroachment, but my fuzzy mental database seems to indicate that your own habitat might tend in that direction, or at least that you’ve spent some quality time out in nature.

Either way, thank you for losing focus long enough to share this.

Reposted from http://ift.tt/1UKG5ib.

awkwardtypo: Yellow-rumped Warbler (Setophaga…

Monday, May 18th, 2015

awkwardtypo:

Yellow-rumped Warbler (Setophaga coronata)

Yellow-rumped Warblers, affectionately called “butterbutts” after their most obvious fieldmark, are one hardy little bird. They winter much farther north than other warblers, most of which make for Central and South America when temperatures drop. The Yellow-rumped Warblers stay in the southern US and Mexico, eating a variety of waxy berries (something no other warbler is digestively equipped to do). In summer they head for northern Canada.

There are several subspecies which were formerly considered separate species. In the eastern US, we have the Myrtle Warbler (male pictured), while in the western US there is Audubon’s Warbler, distinct in its yellow throat and lighter ear patches. Both subspecies have drab brown winter colors, but come spring, molt into vibrant plumage. They even get a regal little crown. Two other subspecies, the Black-fronted Warbler of Mexico and Goldman’s Warbler of Guatemala, also exist.

I intended to do male and female in both winter and breeding plumage, but I got carried away and drew 4 breeding-plumage males!

Reposted from http://ift.tt/1PQW8IT.

magpie-feathers: Lately I’ve been doing tiny gouache studies to…

Wednesday, March 11th, 2015

magpie-feathers:

Lately I’ve been doing tiny gouache studies to ease myself into painting more. This one is a tiny portrait of a Prairie Warbler.

Reposted from http://ift.tt/1HCdGFP.

renatagrieco: August 20, 2014 – Yellow Warbler (Setophaga…

Monday, December 15th, 2014

renatagrieco:

August 20, 2014 – Yellow Warbler (Setophaga petechia)

Yellow Warblers are found throughout North America, wintering in Central and South American mangrove forests. They eat insects, including beetles, caterpillars, and wasps. Cowbirds often parasitize Yellow Warbler nests. If this happens, the warblers usually build a new nest over the old one, sometimes resulting in up to six layers.

Reposted from http://ift.tt/1zfOzXl.

renatagrieco: August 28, 2014 – Black-throated Blue Warbler…

Friday, December 12th, 2014

renatagrieco:

August 28, 2014 – Black-throated Blue Warbler (Setophaga caerulescens)

These warblers spend summers in the northeastern U.S. and southeastern Canada and winters in the Caribbean. They prefer forested areas, although in their winter range females and males spend time in habitats at different elevations. They eat insects, plucked from the undersides of leaves, as well as small fruits. The nest is cup-shaped and made of bark glued together with spider web and saliva.

Reposted from http://ift.tt/1qGEVev.

annarettberg: Golden-winged Warbler.

Wednesday, July 23rd, 2014

annarettberg:

Golden-winged Warbler.

Reposted from http://ift.tt/1z2hbl4.