Archive for August, 2013

lies: nataliakoptseva: John Singer Sargent All the…

Thursday, August 29th, 2013

lies:

nataliakoptseva:

John Singer Sargent

All the Sargent.

Reblogging myself to add more about the painting:

Gladys Vanderbilt, 1906

Gladys Moore Vanderbilt was born in 1886, the youngest of seven siblings. She was a member of the wealthy New York Vanderbilts, great-granddaughter of shipping and railroad magnate Cornelius Vanderbilt. She turned 20 the year this portrait was painted.

Two years later, on January 27, 1908, she married a Hungarian count, László Széchenyi. She was 22, he was 28. The wedding took place in New York, and was much discussed in the Times. This article [PDF] ran the day before the wedding:

Long and Illustrious Record of the Ancient Hungarian Family Into Which Mis Gladys Vanderbilt will be Married To-morrow

The wedding of Count Laszlo Széchényi and Miss Gladys Moore Vanderbilt will take place precisely at 12 to-morrow in the large ballroom of Mrs. Vanderbilt’s New York home, at Fifty-eighth Street and Fifth Avenue. Mgr. Lavelle of St. Patrick’s Cathedral will be the only clergyman, and the ceremony is to be the simplest possible. It will be followed at 12:30 by the breakfast for 150 guests…

Miss Gladys Moore Vanderbilt is the sixth and youngest child of the late Cornelius Vanderbilt. Her mother was a Miss Gyynne, a member of a Western family. All her brothers and sisters but one are living… Despite their large wealth and their two magnificently appointed houses — palaces rather — in Newport and New York, Mr. and Mrs. Vanderbilt never gave elaborate or large entertainments or assumed any place as leaders in any sense in society. They were devoted churchgoers, most simple and unaffected in their tastes, and brought up their children in the same fashion.

It was not until Miss Gladys Vanderbilt made her debut two or three years ago that Mrs. Vanderbilt gave a large dance at her town house. The death shortly after of her brother, Edward Gwynne, threw her again into mourning, and it was not only the first but the last large entertainment in town. Since the death of Cornelius Vanderbilt several years ago she has, with Miss Gladys, spent much time abroad.

The next day’s paper carried a full account of the wedding, including illustrations, play-by-play of the ceremony, and a lengthy guest list: Miss Vanderbilt Now a Countess [PDF]. An excerpt:

Her wedding day was cloudless. The ceremony was of the simplest character, and was witnessed by more than 400 relatives and friends of the two families.

Immediately after the wedding breakfast the Count and Countess left for their honeymoon. To say that they left precipitately is keeping strictly to the truth. They gave the slip to a small army of reporters and photographers who had formed a cordon around the house, bent on capturing the bridal pair for an instant.

With much ostentation a Vanderbilt brougham was driven up to the Fifty-seventh Street entrance, and this was accepted instantly as the signal that the bridal pair would come out there. Perched on the box were a coachman and a footman in the Vanderbilt livery of dark crimson with claret-colored collar.

Within a few seconds the light brigade of reporters and snap-shotters had concentrated its whole force in range of that showy brougham. Every foot of available space was pre-empted and every vantage point filled.

With this snare set, Alfred G. Vanderbilt suddenly drove up to the Fifty-eighth Street entrance in a big Limousine touring car. Just as the car came to a halt, the doors swung open and down the steps tripped the bride with the Count in a big overcoat and derby hat close behind.

Almost before it dawned on the throngs about the house that it was the bride and bridegroom the door of the touring car had slammed shut and the big machine was scooting through Fifty-eighth Street toward Lexington Avenue. Less than two minutes later it had vanished from sight. An hour later the foremost of the pursuing vehicles reported that it had lost track of the bridal couple in Mott Haven.

The couple went on to have five children, all daughters. They spent most of their time in Hungary, where the Count owned two great estates. He died in 1938 at the age of 59. The Countess lived another 27 years, dying in 1965 in Washington, D.C., on the day after what would have been her 57th wedding anniversary.

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/59663906398.

nataliakoptseva: John Singer Sargent All the Sargent.

Wednesday, August 28th, 2013

nataliakoptseva:

John Singer Sargent

All the Sargent.

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/59635315555.

eyrequotes: You know that moment when you have the chance to move in and say something? And there’s…

Wednesday, August 28th, 2013

eyrequotes:

You know that moment when you have the chance to move in and say something? And there’s a little part of you that keeps yelling “Now! Now!….. come on! NOW!”…. but your mouth won’t cooperate? Then you’re stuck- just staring as the situation gets progressively more and more awkward and you move farther and farther away from the moment when it would have made sense to say something. I hate that moment. But i keep finding myself there.

   

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/59626205209.

rainbowrowell: stmartinspress: Author Rainbow Rowell teamed up…

Wednesday, August 28th, 2013

rainbowrowell:

stmartinspress:

Author Rainbow Rowell teamed up with Google Play to film a really fun video titled ‘Two Truths and a Lie’!

Rainbow Rowell tells you three stories — two are true and one is not…watch and guess which one by clicking here!

I got to go to the Google offices in NYC to do this. They have excellent snacks there.

(Editing to add that I didn’t eat any snacks. But I got a tour of their snacks areas and saw their scooter parking.)

I knew right away which was the lie, because two of them are things Rainbow has talked about on Tumblr.

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/59620687649.

dendroica: Lower Falls on Flickr.

Wednesday, August 28th, 2013

dendroica:

Lower Falls on Flickr.

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/59609396331.

eyrequotes: So recently there have been a lot of parties…

Wednesday, August 28th, 2013

eyrequotes:

So recently there have been a lot of parties happening downstairs, and I have been ‘required’ for many of them. I left my camera for one minute to put Adele to bed… and this is happening.

Blanche!

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/59593824046.

windandwater: It was evening and the Even-star was shining in a…

Wednesday, August 28th, 2013

windandwater:

It was evening and the Even-star was shining in a luminous sky close to the moon.

—J.R.R. Tolkien, “Smith of Wootton Major”

The conjunction fandom is the best fandom.

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/59589811197.

jtotheizzoe: fastcodesign: Watch The Earth’s Seasonal…

Wednesday, August 28th, 2013

jtotheizzoe:

fastcodesign:

Watch The Earth’s Seasonal “Heartbeat” From Outer Space

John Nelson is known for building extremely complex visualizations of weather patterns. But his latest creation is a simple animated GIF of 15 frames from NASA’s cloudless satellite photography collection. It’s essentially a year in the life of Earth.

Here, he shares why the visual is so haunting to him personally and to us collectively. We felt that his thoughts were simply too earnest to abridge.

Read: Co.Design

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/59589598605.

Photo

Wednesday, August 28th, 2013

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/59588201779.

ravurian: http://www.towleroad.com/2013/08/chenoweth.html At…

Tuesday, August 27th, 2013

ravurian:

http://www.towleroad.com/2013/08/chenoweth.html

At last night’s concert at the Hollywood Bowl, Kristin Chenoweth chose a random audience member to join her on stage for a performance of “For Good” from Wicked.

The audience member (also, a voice teacher) Sarah Horn, explains:

Toward the end of the second half of the performance, Kristin wanders on to the pasarel. She held a mic up to a lady in front of me and asked if she knew the song “For Good.” Nope. I took the chance, as I was directly behind Kristin, to stand up and wave and say, “I know the song!”

This is not like me – to jump up and wave my arms like a crazy person and raise my voice at a celebrity. As soon as she turned to look at me, I say right back down… and calmly said, “Hiiiii.” …

After this, she moved down the line and asked a guy if he knew the song and bantered with him for a few seconds. Afterwards, she said something about going back to pick me because I was a girl. Then, she invited me up on stage.

I sat there for a moment, stunned. Then the backup singer motioned for me to get up. I shot up out of my chair as my heart leaped up past my throat and started beating in my ears. I don’t really remember what happened between the box and when I first set foot onstage except that there was now a microphone in my hand.

Kristin had no idea what was to come. And that’s pretty much where the video picks up.

(Via towleroad)

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/59562767028.

Living in the future It’s weird the things that have and…

Tuesday, August 27th, 2013

Living in the future

It’s weird the things that have and haven’t come true. And the way they have and haven’t come true.

I walked out of work one day a few years ago, and literally everyone in the Water Garden courtyard was staring at a handheld screen connected to a global computer network, exchanging data, voice, and video in real time with everyone else in the world. I didn’t even notice that happening. It just did, quietly, while my attention was elsewhere.

Or this rocket, which launched, flew around a bit, and landed vertically back on the launchpad. Ho hum. Just another day. I didn’t even know it happened until today, weeks later, when someone I know mentioned that he’s thinking of quitting work at Google for the one other company he’d consider working for, and I asked him what letter it started with, and he said, “It starts with an S and ends with an X.”

How did that happen? Why do I know so much about Miley Cyrus and so little about this?

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/59559703193.

She wanted me to tell you she saw you dance. She said, when you…

Tuesday, August 27th, 2013

She wanted me to tell you she saw you dance. She said, when you were little, you and her had a fight, right before your dance recital. You thought she didn’t come see you dance. She did. She hid in the back so you wouldn’t see. She said you were like an angel. She said you came to the place where they buried her. Asked her a question? She said the answer is… “Every day.” What did you ask?

 

Agreed; Toni Collette was awesome in the movie, and especially in that scene.

I was having a discussion with my daughter the other day about M. Night Shyamalan, and the way the awesomeness of his movies seems to have followed an unvarying downward path. Was he just done after this movie? This was the one he had in him? Or it was a fluke, and the rest have been reversion to the mean? Or it was one of those things where the first-time director gets a lot of help from the AD and cinematographer, and it’s really more their movie than his, while the rest have been increasingly what he himself is actually capable of, and it turns out it’s not much?

I wonder if there’s a similarity to the Star Wars movies, where the first three were actually decent movies in part because Lucas was constrained and had lots of adult supervision, was forced to collaborate, had other people interpreting his vision. But when he had the freedom to indulge himself we (perhaps unsurprisingly) got self-indulgence.

I don’t know. The worst movies by Lucas and Shyamalan are both way better movies than I could ever make. But it’s hard not to wonder what happened.

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/59558085724.

Carbon targets, carbon taxes, and the search for Archimedes’ lever

Tuesday, August 27th, 2013

Carbon targets, carbon taxes, and the search for Archimedes’ lever:

David Roberts continues to make me sad that he’s about to take a year-long hiatus from the Internet.

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/59544973314.

Photo

Tuesday, August 27th, 2013

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/59542138383.

eocene: King Mountain and the Matanuska River by Joe Ganster

Tuesday, August 27th, 2013

eocene:

King Mountain and the Matanuska River by Joe Ganster

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/59541883877.

exponential63: happymathilda: From 1994 interview when asked…

Tuesday, August 27th, 2013

exponential63:

happymathilda:

From 1994 interview when asked the reasons for the success of A Room with a View:

“I’ve never seen it, so I don’t know. Florence was lovely of course, and it’s a wonderful love story.

I did enjoy doing the part, because Maggie Smith and I were old friends from 1958. We both arrived in Florence on the same day and neither of us had any family with us, so we would spend all day together filming and then go out to dinner together, catching up on our Old Vic days.

But, I didn’t enjoy working with James Ivory. I didn’t feel that I was on his wavelength and I didn’t feel that he wanted me in the film, I have to say that”.

James Ivory’s perspective on this (from Robert Emmet Long, James Ivory in Conversation, 2005):

Long: What about Judi Dench, another formidable English actress who has become a household word in America?

Ivory: She was certainly there, all right. But afterward, when we were all done with each other, I had the feeling she wished she’d never agreed to play Miss Lavish after all.

Long: Why is that?

Ivory: Because it wasn’t a very big part, and then we ended up cutting it down further. It wasn’t that she wasn’t good, but because one of her “big” scenes, where she paces out with a measuring tape the murder that Lucy Honeychurch witnessed in the Piazza Signoria, in order to put it in her novel, just wasn’t needed to tell the story. But, as with many actors, the scene that you cut is always the one that they seize on, arguing that it “delineates” the character best or is their “best work” in the film, or whatever. She never forgave me. It’s too bad, because audiences enjoyed what remained of her performance very much. She got an Evening Standard Best Supporting Actress for the part in 1987. To make amends, I sent her a beautiful little drawing that an artist in Florence had made of her, but she never acknowledged it.

Long: The expression on your face seems to say, “I could tell you a lot more.” Is there more?

Ivory: Well, there was a bit more. During postproduction we – I mean Ruth [Prawer Jhabvala] and I – weren’t so happy with Judi’s accent for Miss Lavish. Ruth grew up in England and has a very good ear for English accents. This one was, well, a bit too brightly aggressive, even for a sharp-eyed lady novelist; she seemed always to be too much “on”. So I asked Judi at her post-sync session to tone it down, and even asked her to consider making Miss Lavish into a Scotswoman … [S]he refused. A Scotswoman would be all wrong, she said, looking displeased. Maybe for a mere American to question her accent was too much.

I’m on the record as loving Maggie Smith’s performance in the film. Judi Dench is fine, but it’s Charlotte who stays with me.

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/59514068384.

bobbycaputo: Senior Citizens Having the Time of Their…

Tuesday, August 27th, 2013

bobbycaputo:

Senior Citizens Having the Time of Their Lives

When Kendrick Brinson first heard of Sun City, a retirement community in Arizona that boasts a squad of senior-citizen cheerleaders, she knew she had to visit. Sun City, the first “planned active retirement community,” had its 50thanniversary on Jan. 1, 2010; Brinson made her first trip in December 2009. Six visits and 3½ years later, Brinson released Sun City: Life After Life, a limited-edition book designed by Deb Pang Davis that she envisions as a sort of “retro brochure” or visual guidebook to the community.

With more than 120 clubs, Sun City arguably has one of the most active populaces anywhere, for any age group. In fact, Brinson’s first week in Sun City wore out the twentysomething with all of its daily activities. Brinson explained via email, “What makes Sun City unique, other than the fact that it is an actual city of tens of thousands of retirees, is that almost everyone is active in one way or another. I’d head to the tap class or the yoga class or the pickleball practice and photograph those activities and ask everyone I’d meet what else they had going on and if I could tag along.”

Brinson wanted to focus on a community of senior citizens where the residents were continuing to live, rather than waiting to die. “We’ve all seen photo stories about aging before, and we know the stereotype of a grandparent sitting in a rocking chair as they age,” she said. “What I love about Sun City is that this place is spring break for the elderly. … I wanted to flip the stereotype of the wheelchair-bound granny on its head because that’s not how everyone has to age. Just because you’re 75 doesn’t mean you can’t learn synchronized swimming and be really good at it.”

For reasons of personal history I don’t think I’ve shared on Tumblr (what? personal history I haven’t shared?), this photoset evokes strong memories of my childhood.

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/59513083296.

travelingcolors: Unique Atmosphere, Hokkaido | Japan (by…

Tuesday, August 27th, 2013

travelingcolors:

Unique Atmosphere, Hokkaido | Japan (by Mitsuhiko Kamada)

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/59492960634.

Photo

Monday, August 26th, 2013

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/59460824612.

koryos: white-nosesyndrome.org and Bat Conservation…

Monday, August 26th, 2013

koryos:

white-nosesyndrome.org and Bat Conservation International both have some tips on what people can to do help check the spread of white-nose. I’ll repeat batcon’s here:

  • Encourage your state and federal legislators to allocate funding towards the effort to understand and fight White-nose Syndrome. 
  • Report unusual late-winter bat behavior (bats flying during the daytime, for example) or unexplained bat deaths to your state wildlife agency.
  • Adhere to state, federal and local cave advisories and closures to help us prevent the transmission of White-nose Syndrome. 
  • Educate your friends and families about the benefits of bats and the White-nose Syndrome crisis. 
  • Follow decontamination guidelines when caving and catching bats. Never bring gear from a WNS-positive state to a WNS-negative state.

Batcon is a good place to donate, as they help fund a lot of research grants to stop WNS. I suppose what you could do in your own backyard is maintain forested areas, wetlands, and ponds, since that is ideal bat habitat (lots of mosquitos and other tasties). Reduce outdoor lighting if you can, and you can always consider putting up a bat house.

Oh, and during the summer bats often roost under the loose bark of dead/dying trees, so if you’re taking one down, try observing it for a few nights beforehand. It may be a valuable roost.

Unfortunately there’s really not all that much we can do right now… the spread of white nose is so rapid and pervasive that scientists are still scrambling to come up with ways to treat/prevent it. (Here is a list of abstracts of some of the most recent studies done on WNS.)

And in the meantime, millions of bats have already died. It is horrifying to think that at the rate the die-off is happening, the little brown bat, once one of the most populous species in the U.S., might soon become an endangered species. Or even extinct.

The biologists I worked with when I was a bat technician did not even talk about ‘ifs’ in terms of bat species going extinct. It was when. I’ve read one description of stepping into a hibernaculum affected by WNS as looking “like thousands of pine needles” were on the cave floor. Bat bones.

There are some measures, such as spraying hibernating bats with a form of fungicide, and introducing artificial hibernation sites, that have been attempted, but the results have mostly been failure. Doing anything to disturb hibernating bats has the unintended consequences of waking them up, which is what we are trying to prevent, and bats are reluctant to hibernate in artificial caves- and even then tiny spores of the fungus can still manage to creep in.

And then of course humans are still spreading the fungus, and there has been a very stupid dispute between cavers and bat biologists, both accusing the other of being the source of the spread. I don’t doubt that both are partially to blame, but both need to step up their decontamination measures. 

But of course, the biggest spreader of WNS is not the humans, it is the bats themselves, huddling close together for warmth, and there is extremely little we can do to stop that. 

I hate to leave a post on such a glum note, but this is something I feel pretty sad about. I love bats. I hate knowing that my species has done something that is devastating their populations like this.

(This post made rebloggable by request.)

Reposted from http://lies.tumblr.com/post/59460599831.