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Observations of objects of type "Bright Nebula":

M8 (Lagoon Nebula) (Bright Nebula, in Sagittarius)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 127-mm other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Mon Jul 17 01:30:00 2017 UT   Obs. no.: 2014

Last evening, my brother Anthony & I had the pleasure of viewing the northern lights which resulted from a CME that was ejected by the sunspot AR2665 that I talked about in a previous post. There was both reds & greens from thee aurora with the green blanketing the sky with red streaks coming & going. After the aurora died down we started to observe objects with our computerized telescope. The top objects we viewed were M13, M8, M17, Ms 5,6,7 among others. We also observed Saturn & its moons. We ended the evening by observing the Southern Crown, which was below Sagittarius which contrasted nicely with the Northern Crown. It was a great night to view!!!

M42 (Orion Nebula) (Bright Nebula, in Orion)
Observer: Scott Brady (e-mail: scottb.esc@gmail.com)
Instrument: 114-mm equatorial reflector   Location: Queen Creek, AZ, USA
Transparency: excellent   Seeing: good
Time: Mon Nov 2 05:30:00 2009 UT   Obs. no.: 1836

This was my first observation of this nebula, and was made from my front yard. With my 114mm reflector I was able to see four faint stars that formed a diamond pattern. It took several minutes of observation before I was able to distinguish all four stars. This pattern was surrounded by a very faint haze that appeared to be a grayish color. This was an amazing sight to see, and I look forward to viewing this again with less moonlight.

M17 (Omega Nebula) (Bright Nebula, in Sagittarius)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 50-mm binoculars   Location: Milford, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Sat Jun 20 02:30:00 2009 UT   Obs. no.: 1825

On Friday evening my friends Steve Borer, Rob Masud and Suzanne Manning viewed some objects in the southern sky with my 10X50 binoculars. In Scorpius We observed the globular cluster M4 and the open cluster M7. M7 is quite an impressive open cluster in binoculars with individual stars easily seen. In Sagittarius we observed the open cluster M21, the globular cluster M22 and nebulas M8 and M17. By far M8 was the most impressive of the group with an open cluster on one side and the nebula next to it. M17 was also impressive and I thought it looked like a swan in my binoculars. We also took a peak at Saturn through Rob's 4.5" Dob. Saturn's rings are almost edge on but not quite. All in all a great evening of casual observing.

M42 (Orion Nebula) (Bright Nebula, in Orion)
Observer: Brandon (e-mail: bdavison2@mail.csuchico.edu)
Instrument: 13.1-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Red Bluff, California, USA
Light pollution: light   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Sun Nov 30 04:43:00 2008 UT   Obs. no.: 1805

I saw an object move through the Orion Nebula at 10:43pm November 29, 2008. Didn't look like a satellite, but was on a consistantly straight path to the the lower left (i.e 8 o'clockish). Any ideas?

M42 (Orion Nebula) (Bright Nebula, in Orion)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 127-mm other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Wed Jan 23 23:15:00 2008 UT   Obs. no.: 1755

This evening I observed The Orion Nebula with my 127mm MAK. I was not able to see as much detail tonight compared to other nights. However the grey green color of M42 was still obvious. The four stars of the Trapezium split very well. Actually the Orion Nebula extends out to were the belt stars of Orion are located. There the nebulousity takes on a bluish tinge because the three belt stars are all blue stars. Anyone with a telescope even with low power can cee the color differences.

M42 (Orion Nebula) (Bright Nebula, in Orion)
Observer: Joe Caggiano (e-mail: jcaggiano@mindspring.com, web: http://home.mindspring.com/~jcaggiano/)
Instrument: 10-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Glenside, Pa, USA
Light pollution: none   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: poor
Time: Tue Oct 2 10:15:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1715

Woke up very early this morning to what I thought would have been perfect seeing conditions. A very dark sky and very crisp air about an hour before sunrise. Orion, the last quarter moon and Mars were directly overhead. Venus blazed in the East light a beacon. I guessed Venus to be mag -4.0 or thereabout. My (first) target was M42. This was my first viewing with the new telescope. It was exceptional. It completely blew away any previous view through my 6" newt. The nebula had to be 3 times larger than I had ever seen it, not due to pumping up the magnification but instead because of so much more of the nebula that was visible. The long wisps of cloud along it's major axis were thin yet very well defined through binoviewers. Oddly, the view was not any better using a nebula filter. Since I had to get ready for work, I did not allow the scope to cool down which may account for the less than satisfactory views of the moon and Mars. Alot of ghosting and unfocused views no matter how I much I tried in vain to achieve good focus. All seems to be collimated so my only guess is choppy atmosphere or no ample cool down time.

M8 (Lagoon Nebula) (Bright Nebula, in Sagittarius)
Observer: John (e-mail: mail@mail.com, web: http://www.cumparaostea.ro/)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: -, -, -
Light pollution: none   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Wed Aug 8 00:00:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1693

M8's nebulosity was barely visible without the O-III filter. With the filter inplace nebulosity was clearly evident, the so-called Hourglass was very distinct,and the major dark lane was quite noticeable.

M8 (Lagoon Nebula) (Bright Nebula, in Sagittarius)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 18-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Milford, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: good
Time: Sat Jun 16 02:00:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1667

This evening my friends Mike Dzubaty, his son Mike, Steve Borer and I joined other members of The Astronomical Society of New Haven for an evening of stargaing at Silver Sands State Park in Milford Ct. The first thing we observed was the slender one day old moon low in the western sky. The moon was pencil thin and we were able to see Saber's Beads on the moon's lower cusp. As the moon was setting my other friend, Joe Cseh, arrived with news that spaceweather.com was predicting noctillucent clouds may be in our western sky. As soon as we all looked towards the western horizon, we were able to see several blue noctillucent clouds as the sky darkened. These clouds lasted about a half an hour before they faded away. It was only the second time in my life that I saw them. Next we observed Venus, Saturn and Jupiter through through Greg's 18" Dob. Venus showed some subtle shading in its cloud bank while Saturn and Titan were great in the scope. On Jupiter it appears that a piece of the South Temperate Belt was starting to appear on Jupiter. It's been two or three years since I saw the STB. We then started to observe some deep space objects. We began with the globular clusters M13 and M92. Both globulars showed many individual stars in the 18" Dob. M57 was a perfect donut. We then turned our attention to two more globulars, M28 and M4. M28 was not to impressive but M4 showed the individual stars very clearly. We all agreed M4 looked more like an open cluster than a globular cluster and I predict that it will be reclassified as an open cluster by the astronomical community. We then visited M8, M20 and M21. M8 had nebulosity on one side and an open star cluster on the other side. M20's nebulosity was faint but the open cluster M21 was impressive. Speaking of impressive, M11 The Wild Duck Cluster was just that. Finally we observed the Spiral galaxy M51. M51 and its companion galaxy NGC 5195 cores both showed well. We were able to see the spiral effects of M51 and it was nice. Finally we saw the ISS brighten to better than -6th Magnitude when it was going by. We also saw about ten other satellites as well. Finally, the fireflies that were all around us only made it better.

M42 (Orion Nebula) (Bright Nebula, in Orion)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 127-mm other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Tue Feb 20 00:00:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1624

This evening, my brother Anthony and I observed several objects during a one hour period in 19 degree weather. The first thing we looked at was a beautiful pairing of the moon and Venus in the western sky. The earthshine was very bright and we could see some mares on the darkside of the moon. Saber's Beads were very obvious and this was my brother's first observation of them. They can be seen on the lower cusp of a crescent moon one or two days around full moon. The long period variable star Mira is currenly at 2nd magnitude in its cycle. When it is this bright, the star star appears to be orange in color. As Mira begins to fade, it will begin to look redder in color. We then began to switch our attention to Orion Nebula. Both M42 and M43 showed plenty of detail and exibited a pale green color. We then swithed to the belt stars were the nebulosity had a bluish tinge do to the blue color of the belt stars. The belt star Alnitak is a double star that was easilly split. We then went to Rigel were its faint companion was rather difficult to split. Its faint compaion was very close to Rigel. We swithed to Sirius in order to observe it with my Star Spectroscope. Its two hydrogen lines showed easily and this means Sirius is a healthy star. Next it was on to Saturn where I was able to show my brother his first view of the Seeliger effect which shows the rings of saturn in front of Saturn's face being brighter than usual because Saturn is at opposition. Saturn's moon Titan had a yellow orange glow to it because of its hazy atmosphere. Next we went to Regulus to split it and its companion. Regulus is a very wide double that even a small scope can easilly split. Finally I saved the best for last. Tonight was such a transparant galaxy night my brother and I decided to try for the small satellite galaxy Leo 1 which is located right next to Regulus. We found it almost instantly. It looked like a small oval shaped smudge. It looked about four Regulus' long and about two Regulus' wide. I thus finished my big day night double header of astronomy. During the day I saw no sunspots on the sun.

M42 (Orion Nebula) (Bright Nebula, in Orion)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 127-mm other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: good
Time: Tue Nov 21 04:00:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1584

This evening, I observed the nebulosity of the constellation of Orion with my 127mm MAK and 12mm Televue Eyepiece. The Orion Nebula, M42 and M43 had a drab green color to it. There looked to be both tendrils and dustlanes in the nebula. The nebula does extend well beyond M42. An example is the belt stars of Orion in which each belt star is embedded in blue nebulosity. The nebula in that area is colored blue because the belt stars are so blue. Another nebula, NGC 1973 is just above the Orion Nebula and is an impressive nebula in its own right. In reality, NGC 1973 is really an extention of the Orion Nebula. Below M42, there is an open cluster in which some of the brighter members also seemed to have a little nebulosity. Finally, there is an impressive open cluster of stars around the three belt stars of Orion. This cluster is best seen with binoculars. A Leonid meteor zoomed by to the left of Orion to complete the evening's festivities.

M8 (Lagoon Nebula) (Bright Nebula, in Sagittarius)
Observer: Mel Dawson (e-mail: dawsonian2000@yahoo.com, web: http://www.vega-sky-center.com)
Instrument: 10-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Riverview, Florida, United States
Light pollution: light   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Sat Jul 15 02:15:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1550

This day marked another pinnacle in the history of the Vega Sky Center with the testing of the new SAO 10" Newtonian Equatorial Fork Mount reflector. Gary Barabino of the VAO travel from Waggamans, LA on vacation to the Sunshine State to witness first light of this grand instrument.I had just complete test assembling the 10" Newtonian fork mount and decided to go ahead with mounting the optics since Gary was in town. The scope was rolled out of the garage and the first object interest we spotted was Jupiter, looming in the constellation Libra. We had not fully aligned the optics in the scope, but they were setup sufficiently for the test.Upon targeting Jupiter using a 26mm 2" GSO eyepiece, we were graced with a splendid image. The jovian moons Calisto, and Ganymede were on one side while Io, and Europa held tight on the other. The Red Spot was not visible, but I could see the shadow of Io just grazing the limb of Jupiter. Though the optical combination only yeild 55x, this gave me verification of the integrety of the mirror.Next it was time to test the optics on a deep sky object. We chose M8, the Lagoon Nebula. Gary took the drivers seat and quickly landed the nebula in the field of view. He focused and gave out Vega's infamous yell of "Look at that!...". The intense center nebulosity glowed fairly bright, and the cluster just to side glistened. Not bad for a set of optics created back in 1986 and being used for the first time. We continued sweeping the area of the center of the Milky Way in and near Sagittarius and saw countless stars. Star cluster sparkled like hand fulls of diamonds!Unfortunately, the testing/ observing came to a rather sudden end when clouds begin to filter in from the east obscuring the sky completely in a matter of minutes. Nevertheless, we accomplished what we sat out to do, and that was to verify the optics were of good quality.We concluded the session with removing the OTA and taking out the mirrors to complete the finishing process of the scope. The check out the step-by-step construction process for this grand instrument, please go to http://www.vega-sky-center.com. We are updating the website on a regular basis. Also check out the drop-down boxes to reveal a list of our favorite sites.Clear Skies, Forever!Mel DawsonThe Vega Sky Center

M20 (Trifid Nebula) (Bright Nebula, in Sagittarius)
Observer: Joe Caggiano (e-mail: jcaggiano@mindspring.com, web: http://home.mindspring.com/~jcaggiano/)
Instrument: 6-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Glenside, Pa, USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Sat Jun 17 05:45:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1544

After having some decent luck with the UHC filter, I moved further south along "nebula row". Closer to the star Kaus Borealis (the top star in the Tea Kettle) I spotted M20. It was located approx. 6.2 NW of the star. Using the filter made all the difference in the bright southern sky. The nebula appeared as a roundish cloud with multiple bright regions around the edges surrounding darker lanes in the center. It appeared about twice as large as M16 though not as bright. Stars dotted the perimeter of the cloud. It is listed as magnitude 6.3.

M42 (Orion Nebula) (Bright Nebula, in Orion)
Observer: Joe Caggiano (e-mail: jcaggiano@mindspring.com, web: http://home.mindspring.com/~jcaggiano/)
Instrument: 6-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Glenside, Pa, USA
Light pollution: light   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Wed Mar 8 01:45:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1508

Nice viewing of M42 and M43 region. Using binoviewers at 71x and 142x and a Nebula Filter, the Great Nebula Region was huge! Long whisps of mist coiled around inside my FOV and the M43 cloud was also readily visible. The trapezium yielded 5 stars without the Nebula filter but only 4 stars with it on the eyepiece. The stars lose about a magnitude or so when using the filters in order to draw out more contrast for the nebula,s visibility.

M42 (Orion Nebula) (Bright Nebula, in Orion)
Observer: Joe Caggiano (e-mail: jcaggiano@mindspring.com, web: http://home.mindspring.com/~jcaggiano/)
Instrument: 6-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Glenside, Pa, USA
Light pollution: light   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Mon Feb 20 02:00:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1496

Simply beautiful view of the Great Nebula. It was crisp and easy to view at any power (71x up to 203x). Made out 5 stars in the Trapezium. M43 appeared larger than usual due to the excellent observing conditions. Still have not been able to see any real detail to NCG 1973, 1975 or 1977 as of yet. Perhaps through time exposure I will have some luck.

M42 (Orion Nebula) (Bright Nebula, in Orion)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 10-mm binoculars   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: good
Time: Mon Feb 13 23:15:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1490

This evening, after finishing work, my friend Don Hartlin and I took a ten minute binocular view of the night sky. First we went to M42 the Orion Nebula. In 10X50 binoculars, M42 looked like a small nebula with two blue stars in it. We then shifted to the three belt stars of Orion to observe Colandor 70, which is an open cluster of stars around the three belt stars. M45, the Pleiades, looks great in binoculars. However, because it wasn't quite dark out, we could not see the blue color of the stars. Finally The Hyades open cluster was really impressive with its mostly yellow stars. All in all, a nice evening of observing.

M42 (Orion Nebula) (Bright Nebula, in Orion)
Observer: B (e-mail: brilbri29@hotmail.com)
Instrument: 8-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Denver, Colorado, USofA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: poor
Time: Thu Dec 29 16:00:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1459

Bright Nebula in Orion. Very bright. Could see the wavy fingers of the nebula, if you know what I mean.Slit the trapezium easily, I was going to go for the fainter star 1F but forgot!! Can't believe it.

M42 (Orion Nebula) (Bright Nebula, in Orion)
Observer: Akarsh Simha (e-mail: akarsh_simha@fastmail.fm)
Instrument: 8-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Light pollution: none   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Thu Dec 8 22:00:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1447

This observation was from a village about 50 kms from the city, where light pollution is practically nil. The Orion Nebula looked like a grayscale version of David Malin's photograph of the same. It was breathtaking. The city of Bangalore offers enough light pollution to mar the view completely.M 43 in the field appeared as a separate patch of nebulosity with a star in the center.The whole thing looked like a bird with wings spread out.

M42 (Orion Nebula) (Bright Nebula, in Orion)
Observer: Joe Caggiano (e-mail: jcaggiano@mindspring.com, web: http://home.mindspring.com/~jcaggiano/)
Instrument: 70-mm binoculars   Location: Glenside, Pa, USA
Light pollution: light   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Thu Dec 8 04:00:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1428

Viewed the Moon and M42 last night. Started with the moon shortly after coming home from work. I was able to take a few pics of it with the LPI and have posted another mosaic on my webpage. About 5 hours later I viewed M42 with my 15x70 binos and a nebula filter. The view at 15x with the filter was amazing! The nebula looked completely different than what I am used to. Overall, it was about 1 1/2 times larger than usual. The filter really brought out subtle features that are invisible otherwise. The nebula took on a flame-shape with smaller nebulae being just visible above. (I believe this was NGC1973, 75 and 77). There was also a definite green hue clearly visible. On previous viewings through my scope I have picked up hues of pale green without having the filter. But with the filter, a much darker green is definetly visible even through much smaller aperature binos. I will target this nebula region with much more scrutiny this weekend if given the chance. We are due in for a major snow storm tonight through the weekend.

NGC2467 (Bright Nebula, in Puppis)
Observer: Sriram.M.Gubbi (e-mail: sriram_gubbi@yahoo.co.in, web: http://dino.lm.com/artists/display.php?name=sriram_gubbi)
Instrument: 6-inch other   Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Sun Nov 13 04:30:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1417

I'm not completely sure that I've seen the nebulosity but I remember that I saw a patch around the cluster using the Orion Skyglow filter.

M78 (Bright Nebula, in Orion)
Observer: Sriram.M.Gubbi (e-mail: sriram_gubbi@yahoo.co.in, web: http://dino.lm.com/artists/display.php?name=sriram_gubbi)
Instrument: 6-inch other   Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: good
Time: Fri Nov 11 04:15:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1408

It can be easily found with a wide field scope. It appeared comet like with about 2 stars surrounded by it.

NGC7000 (Bright Nebula, in Cygnus)
Observer: Joe Caggiano (e-mail: jcaggiano@mindspring.com)
Instrument: 70-mm binoculars   Location: Glenside, Pa, USA
Light pollution: light   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: good
Time: Mon Nov 7 00:45:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1395

Spotted the North American nebula just a few degrees off from Deneb. Using a nebula filter and my 15x70 Skymaster binos, I spotted the formation of stars that form what appears to be a sidewards "A" in the stars. It was so large and diffuse that I passed it numerous times before in my scope at 30x. In the binos it took up a great portion of my FOV. No wonder I could not spot it before! It appeared about as large as M42 appears at about 100x. VERY faint, at low power I can just make out the continental shape as well as the rift between it and the pelican nebula just next to it.

M42 (Orion Nebula) (Bright Nebula, in Orion)
Observer: Lee S (e-mail: nospam-laspain123@aol.com, web: http://cgi.tripod.com/astro-cracker/cgi-bin/YaBB.pl)
Instrument: 2.8-inch refractor   Location: Atlanta, GA, USA
Light pollution: severe   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Sat Oct 29 08:00:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1384

As impressive as M42 is with binoculars, it was fun to get a closer view with my Orion Observer. The Trapezium (Theta 1) was easily resolved into 4 stars. With 25mm Explorer II, I could see there were 4 stars, the 10mm Explorer II made it more clear, and the 8mm Plossl provided a good view as well. The only downside that I saw was that the general impression of the gas cloud area was slightly diminished for me when looking through the scope.

M42 (Orion Nebula) (Bright Nebula, in Orion)
Observer: Lee S (e-mail: nospam-laspain123@aol.com, web: http://cgi.tripod.com/astro-cracker/cgi-bin/YaBB.pl)
Instrument: 50-mm binoculars   Location: Atlanta, GA, USA
Light pollution: severe   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Sat Oct 29 07:15:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1383

I was glad to stay up late enough to greet Orion for the first time this fall. With an old pair of 10x50 wide angle binoculars, I could see M42 and get a general impression of the gas clouds around the region.

NGC6960 (Bright Nebula, in Cygnus)
Observer: Emil Neata (e-mail: forvert2000@yahoo.com, web: http://www.nightskyinfo.com)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: No location given
Light pollution: light   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Mon Oct 10 23:00:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1361

You can find NGC 6960 (Lace - Work Nebula, part of Veil Nebula) around the fourth magnitude star 52 Cygni.The nebula is very difficult in less than perfect skies, but visible with a 114-mm telescope from a dark location. Use averted vision, and keep 52 Cygni just out of the field.A UHC or OIII filter can really improve the visibility of the nebula, it allows much more contrast and detail to be seen, even if you observe from a slightly light polluted location.

M1 (Crab Nebula) (Bright Nebula, in Taurus)
Observer: Emil Neata (e-mail: forvert2000@yahoo.com, web: http://www.nightskyinfo.com)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: No location given
Light pollution: light   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Mon Oct 10 23:00:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1360

M 1, the Crab Nebula, is a supernova remnant in Taurus. At 36x is very spectacular, one of the very few deep sky objects that when seen through the eyepiece looks almost exactly like when seen on a photograph. The light is evenly spread and the elongated shape is easily visible.

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