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Observations of objects of type "Globular Cluster":

M13 (Hercules Cluster) (Globular Cluster, in Hercules)
Observer: Marcos González Troyas (e-mail: mgtroyas@gmail.com)
Instrument: 8-inch Schmidt-Cassegrain reflector   Location: Madrid, Madrid, Spain
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Sat Jul 15 00:15:00 2017 UT   Obs. no.: 2015

Se resuelven las estrellas fácilmente.

M68 (Globular Cluster, in Hydra)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 16-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Milford, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Sat May 16 01:25:00 2009 UT   Obs. no.: 1822

Last evening my brother Anthony, my friends Steve Borer, Mike Dzubaty and his son Mike went to a local star party at Silver Sands State Park. The first object we observed was Saturn. Both hemispheres showed some cloud bands with its rings almost tilted edge on. Four moons of Saturn were also visible. We observed five galaxies with M104 showing its dust lane fairly well. Right near M104 was the Alligator Asterism which I saw for the first time ever. M82's dust lanes also showed up well also but its companion M81 was a lot brighter. M51 and its companion NGC 1595 cores looked like a pair of head lights in the 16' Dob. As for globular clusters M3 and M13 were there usual bright sights. There was more speckling in M13 than in M3. It's been many years since I observed the very faint globular cluster M68. With the 16" Dob. we were able to actually see a few individual stars. Thank goodness for large scopes. The grand finale was M57 the ring nebula which really was showing well. For icing on the cake we had two passes from the ISS. Star Paries, that's the life.

M79 (Globular Cluster, in Lepus)
Observer: Les (e-mail: lesjdguard-astrolog@yahoo.com)
Instrument: 11-inch Schmidt-Cassegrain reflector   Location: Blackwell, Oklahoma, USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Wed Dec 31 02:15:00 2008 UT   Obs. no.: 1809

Globular cluster (dwarf galaxy} in Lepus. Some resolution. Could see brighter core. Better seeing with 40mm eyepiece than 20mm with light pollution filter

M30 (Globular Cluster, in Capricornus)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 18-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Milford, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Sat Oct 13 00:30:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1718

This evening my friends Mike Dzubaty, Steve Borer and I joined other members of the Astronomical Society of New Haven for a public star party in Silver Sands State Park in Milford Ct. Most of our observing involved looking at Globular clusters. We started first by observing M15 in Pegasus. This globular was rather large but individual stars were not easy to see. In Hercules we observed the two good old standbys M13 and M92. In each case many individual stars were easily resolved. That's what makes these two globular clusters so great. We also observed M30 in Capricornus. This globular cluster was small yet interesting. I was able to see two trails of stars leading out from the globular cluster. In Andromeda we observed galaxies M31 and M32. We were able to see the dust lane cutting through the galaxy while M32 showed itself very well. In Lyra we visited M57 The Ring Nebula. One view of this and we were all craving a donut. It was very sharp and clear. Finally we turned the small rich field telescope onto M45 The Pleiades Open Cluster. These Stars are as blue as they can be. What beauty. While we were observing about three or four slow moving Dracanoid Meteors went across the sky. One of them was very bright and it ended with a bright flash. Once again we had a successful night of observing.

M13 (Hercules Cluster) (Globular Cluster, in Hercules)
Observer: Christina (e-mail: christinabischoff@hotmail.com)
Instrument: 10-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Rio Rico, AZ, USA
Light pollution: light   Seeing: excellent
Time: Sun Aug 12 05:07:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1690

I decided to try for an easier object for my first ever try at finding something on my own. Even through the small amount of light pollution from the street lights below, it was clear; the center was too crowded with stars to make out the individual ones, but the outer stars were distinguishable. I'm definately thankful I managed to finally stumble upon it!

NGC5139 (Globular Cluster, in Centaurus)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 50-mm binoculars   Location: Vieques, Puerto Rico, United States
Light pollution: none   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Tue May 22 00:00:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1658

For that past week Steve Borer, his four adult children and one of their friends and I vacationed in Vieques Island off the east coast of Puerto Rico. While the others did their thing, Steve and I did plenty of observing of the southern skies of Vieques. The first thing we went for was the great globular cluster Omega Centauri in the constellation Centaurus. In my 10X50 binoculars Omega Centauri was about two thirds the size of the moon. We couldn't see individual stars in my binoculars but the view was as great as everyone says it is. We also observed Alpha Centauri. Our closest neighbor to the sun had a slight yellow tinge to it. To our great surprise below Centaurus was the Southern Cross. At that latitude, 18 degrees north, The Southern Cross was Lying on its side with only some of its stars showing. If we got to Vieques two or three weeks earlier we would have seen the entire Southern Cross. We also did some predawn observing. The first thing we discovered was the summer Milkyways' southern branch reaches right up to M7 the big open cluster of Scopius. We found the northern branch of the Milkyway was no match for the southern branch of the milkyway. We were able to enjoy the rifts of both branches of the Milkyway with the southern rift being more obvious. We then recieved our second great surprise. Further down the Milkyway was the Coal Sack Nebula. We were completely stunned. Another great constellation we viewed was the Southern Crown. The Southern Crown was slightly more impressive than the Northern Crown which was over our heads. M8 and M21 were beautiful because they were higher in the sky. We did many things in Vieques but astronmy in Vieques was #1.

M13 (Hercules Cluster) (Globular Cluster, in Hercules)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 8-inch refractor   Location: New Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Fri May 4 01:00:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1650

This evening my friends Mike Dzubaty, his son Mike, Steve Borer and I visited the Leitner Observatory at Yale University for a night of viewing through their big scopes. The first object we viewed was Venus in an 8" Schmidt Cassegarain. Venus is still slightly more than half lit. I noticed some albedo features at the terminator. Next we went to the 8" refractor to observe Saturn. The Cassini Division showed well on the planet. On the face of Saturn itself, I noticed two belts and the polar south polar hood showed well. We then went over to the 16" reflecter were we had the pleasure of observing the double star Iota Cancri. The brighter componant was gold and the dimmer star was blue. It's not known if Iota Cancri is a real double or just an opticle double. The grand finale was the globular cluster M13. In the 16" scope we were able to see an lot of individual stars in the cluster. Before we went home we watched an orange moon that was just passed full rise in the east. Another great night of astronomy!

M92 (Globular Cluster, in Hercules, Est. RaDec 17h17m6s 437'58")
Observer: James Turley (e-mail: admin@backyard-sketches.co.uk, web: http://backyard-sketches.co.uk)
Instrument: 305-mm Dobsonian reflector   Location: Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Thu Sep 7 20:01:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1781

Could not resolve any core stars, bright though, easily as nice as M13

M22 (Globular Cluster, in Sagittarius)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 18-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Milford, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Sat Aug 19 01:30:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1558

This evening, a large group of us went to Eels Hill in Milford Ct. for an evening of observing. We started the evening by looking at Jupiter with the one member of the group's 18" dob. There was a huge white oval that was attached to the southern edge of the north equitorial belt. The storm was white with a dark circle going around it. The NEB also had good festooning on it. We toured around the southern skies to observe some Messier objects. In the 18" dob with bino viewers, M22 globular cluster was spectacular. It looked 3D with many individual stars showing. The globular clusters M10 and M12 also showed many individual stars. The Wild Duck Cluster, M11 was awesome. There was a veriable star in the middle which really stood out. I never noticed this star before because it was dim every time I looked at M11. The best nebula I viewed was the Swan Nebula. It clearly looked like a swan. The Dumbbell Nebula, M27 also was a great site in the 18" dob. We also observed M8, M20, M21 and M57. We also observed a beautiful garnet star. As for satellites, we observed an Iridium flare, Envisat and the ISS. Our final observation of the evening was of Neptune and its moon Tritan. Neptunes disk was a pale green color and Tritan was a grey dot. All in all, it was a graet evening of viewing.

M56 (Globular Cluster, in Lyra)
Observer: Joe Caggiano (e-mail: jcaggiano@mindspring.com, web: http://home.mindspring.com/~jcaggiano/)
Instrument: 6-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Glenside, Pa, USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Wed Jun 14 03:11:30 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1541

Another night of turbulent atmosphere that turned Jupiter into mush made me decide to try and find something new to look at. The Cygnus region of the Galxy was rising in the East and was a pretty good way up above the horizon. I started with the Ring Nebula but the glow from that horizon pretty much drowned it out. working my way further east I spotted the globular cluster M56. At 30x it was very small (one of the smallest globulars I have seen) and was not too well resolved. It is rather distant at 33,ooo light years and has a visiual brightness of 8.3 magnitude, but with the conditions I was facing, light pollution, high level wispy clouds ect...it was probably just withing my scopes range. It is also rather small at 8.8 arcminutes diameter. I had mixed feelings about it. DIsappointment at it's lack lusterness yet proud that I found it in such lousy conditions. I will view again later on this year when it is higher in the sky.

M5 (Globular Cluster, in Serpens)
Observer: Joe Caggiano (e-mail: jcaggiano@mindspring.com, web: http://home.mindspring.com/~jcaggiano/)
Instrument: 6-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Glenside, Pa, USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: poor
Time: Mon May 29 05:00:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1534

While viewing Jupiter I located M5. Viewing at 71x, it appeared as a round haze. I did not have enough aperature to resolve into individual stars though.

M3 (Globular Cluster, in Canes Venatici)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 12-inch Schmidt-Cassegrain reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Fri Apr 21 01:00:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1527

This evening, my friends, Mike Dzubaty, his son Mike, Steve Borer and I visited the Yale Observatory to view deep space objects through their fine observatory telescopes. Our first object was globular cluster M3. We were able to easily see many individual stars in M3. I saw speckling even towards the center of M3. M44, the behive cluster, featured several groups of triple star systems within the open cluster. The galaxies we observed were M65,66,81,82,87& ngc4438. M82 impressed me the most because of all the dust lanes in it.The others were mostly views of the cores with some haze around them. For double stars, we observed Iota Cassiope and Mizar. The Iota double was a gold primary star and a blue secondary star, while Mizar was split into two white componants. Finally we viewed Jupiter, Saturn and Mars through Yale's 200 year old 8" refractor. I'm not sure, but I think I saw Mars' north polar ice cap. Next month, we will be heading back to Yale's obsevatory for more astronomy.

NGC5139 (Globular Cluster, in Centaurus)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 50-mm binoculars   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Thu Apr 20 04:00:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1526

This evening, my friend Mike Dzubaty, his son Mike and I decided to go for the ultimate prize, Omega Centauri, the great southern sky globular cluster. Every spring, Omega Centauri pops three degrees above the horizon here in southern Connecticut. We started to scan the horizon with our 10X50 binoculars and ultimately found our target star Zeta Centauri. Omega Centauri was directly right of it and in our binos, it looked like a large defuse glow. We also saw many other stars in Centaurus including stars that were lower on the horizon than Omega Centauri. Omega Centauri will remain visable in the north for another four weeks or so. Also, this summer, another great southern sky object will be visable to us northerners. This is called the Southern Crown and it will be located below Sagittarius. I've observed the Southern Crown before and it is a lot easier to spot than Omega Centauri.

M9 (Globular Cluster, in Ophiuchus)
Observer: Sriram.M.Gubbi (e-mail: sriram_gubbi@yahoo.co.in, web: http://dino.lm.com/artists/display.php?name=sriram_gubbi)
Instrument: 6-inch other   Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Fri Jan 20 05:50:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1477

A circular and a rich globular. Could'nt see anything more due to twilight.

M92 (Globular Cluster, in Hercules)
Observer: Sriram.M.Gubbi (e-mail: sriram_gubbi@yahoo.co.in, web: http://dino.lm.com/artists/display.php?name=sriram_gubbi)
Instrument: 6-inch other   Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Fri Jan 20 05:40:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1478

I think I've seen this one earlier but this time, it appeared beautiful, showing hints of resolution with a bright centre. One peculiar fact is that it appears brighter than M13 to my eyes!

M12 (Globular Cluster, in Ophiuchus)
Observer: Sriram.M.Gubbi (e-mail: sriram_gubbi@yahoo.co.in, web: http://dino.lm.com/artists/display.php?name=sriram_gubbi)
Instrument: 6-inch other   Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Fri Jan 20 05:30:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1476

It is located close to M10. Identical to M10 but appeared a bit larger and slightly oval with the same brightness as its neighbour.

NGC5986 (Globular Cluster, in Lupus)
Observer: Sriram.M.Gubbi (e-mail: sriram_gubbi@yahoo.co.in, web: http://dino.lm.com/artists/display.php?name=sriram_gubbi)
Instrument: 6-inch other   Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Fri Jan 20 05:20:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1479

A bright globular, often neglected by everyone. It is a very good globular. If any of you have'nt seen it, then give it a shoot. Its nice!

M10 (Globular Cluster, in Ophiuchus)
Observer: Sriram.M.Gubbi (e-mail: sriram_gubbi@yahoo.co.in, web: http://dino.lm.com/artists/display.php?name=sriram_gubbi)
Instrument: 6-inch other   Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Fri Jan 20 05:20:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1475

Appeared a bit loose and slightly oval, but bright. I think I have seen this with my 2 inch about an year ago.

NGC5286 (Globular Cluster, in Centaurus)
Observer: Sriram.M.Gubbi (e-mail: sriram_gubbi@yahoo.co.in, web: http://dino.lm.com/artists/display.php?name=sriram_gubbi)
Instrument: 6-inch other   Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Wed Dec 28 04:45:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1454

I did'nt want to aim for it but just gave it a try and I did see it. It was visible using averted vision, situated very close to a bright star.

M53 (Globular Cluster, in Coma Berenices)
Observer: Sriram.M.Gubbi (e-mail: sriram_gubbi@yahoo.co.in, web: http://dino.lm.com/artists/display.php?name=sriram_gubbi)
Instrument: 6-inch other   Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Wed Dec 28 03:55:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1458

A good globular cluster in a region filled with galaxies. It appeared bigger than the normal globulars and somewhat whitish in colour.

M30 (Globular Cluster, in Capricornus)
Observer: Sriram.M.Gubbi (e-mail: sriram_gubbi@yahoo.co.in, web: http://dino.lm.com/artists/display.php?name=sriram_gubbi)
Instrument: 6-inch other   Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Sat Nov 19 19:46:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1407

A fairly bright globular cluster gave a mottled view through my telescope. It is located very close to a star.

NGC6441 (Globular Cluster, in Scorpius)
Observer: Akarsh Simha (e-mail: akarsh_simha@fastmail.fm)
Instrument: 8-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: good
Time: Fri Sep 23 15:15:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1339

A beautiful, bright, easy-to-locate globular in Scorpius. It is just about a mere 5 minutes from the 3.21 mag red star in Scorpius between Shaula and eta Sagittarii. Absolutely easy to find and wonderful at mag 7.4. Shows a brightness gradient from center to periferri. It is quite large. It is strange that this is not a Messier object.

M72 (Globular Cluster, in Aquarius)
Observer: Akarsh Simha (e-mail: akarsh_simha@fastmail.fm)
Instrument: 8-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Wed Sep 21 16:30:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1334

Practically impossible globular, like its precursor in the Messier catalog. The globular is so faint that I hardly saw anything. Careful use of averted vision showed a large hazy patch just above a star. Simply too faint, or maybe it was the moon that had just risen by then. Best view was a 83x on my scope.Its very close neighbour is the successor in the Messier catalog, M73.

M30 (Globular Cluster, in Capricornus)
Observer: Akarsh Simha (e-mail: akarsh_simha@fastmail.fm)
Instrument: 8-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Light pollution: light   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Wed Sep 21 15:45:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1333

Very prominent and comparatively bright globular cluster. Fairly large. Central brightness and surrounding haze are clear. Beautiful, but like any other globular. I expected a very faint, practically invisible globular cluster, but was astonished to see this beautiful sight.

M75 (Globular Cluster, in Sagittarius)
Observer: Akarsh Simha (e-mail: akarsh_simha@fastmail.fm)
Instrument: 8-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Light pollution: severe   Transparency: fair   Seeing: good
Time: Fri Sep 16 17:00:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1323

Terrible sky as a result of 14th day waxing moon. A thin haze was also present. This was a real difficult one on such a day, but nevertheless, since SGR is rarely visible from our region (due to Monsoon) I ventured out (successfully) for M75. With a star chart to mag 10 or so that I copied down from SkyChart v2.7 + Tycho 2 Star Catalog, it was a difficult but interesting manuever from omega SGR (Flamsteed 58) to M75 (about 5 arc degrees movement). A very faint, very small, bright (relatively for today's expectations), out-of-focus star-like greenish object viewed best at 100x or so on a 8" f/8. I'm quite sure I've found it as the object I've seen is definitely not a star. It looks as though two faint stars closely neighbour this globular.

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