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Observations of object "M13 (Hercules Cluster)":

M13 (Hercules Cluster) (Globular Cluster, in Hercules)
Observer: Marcos González Troyas (e-mail: mgtroyas@gmail.com)
Instrument: 8-inch Schmidt-Cassegrain reflector   Location: Madrid, Madrid, Spain
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Sat Jul 15 00:15:00 2017 UT   Obs. no.: 2015

Se resuelven las estrellas fácilmente.

M13 (Hercules Cluster) (Globular Cluster, in Hercules)
Observer: Christina (e-mail: christinabischoff@hotmail.com)
Instrument: 10-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Rio Rico, AZ, USA
Light pollution: light   Seeing: excellent
Time: Sun Aug 12 05:07:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1690

I decided to try for an easier object for my first ever try at finding something on my own. Even through the small amount of light pollution from the street lights below, it was clear; the center was too crowded with stars to make out the individual ones, but the outer stars were distinguishable. I'm definately thankful I managed to finally stumble upon it!

M13 (Hercules Cluster) (Globular Cluster, in Hercules)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 8-inch refractor   Location: New Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Fri May 4 01:00:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1650

This evening my friends Mike Dzubaty, his son Mike, Steve Borer and I visited the Leitner Observatory at Yale University for a night of viewing through their big scopes. The first object we viewed was Venus in an 8" Schmidt Cassegarain. Venus is still slightly more than half lit. I noticed some albedo features at the terminator. Next we went to the 8" refractor to observe Saturn. The Cassini Division showed well on the planet. On the face of Saturn itself, I noticed two belts and the polar south polar hood showed well. We then went over to the 16" reflecter were we had the pleasure of observing the double star Iota Cancri. The brighter componant was gold and the dimmer star was blue. It's not known if Iota Cancri is a real double or just an opticle double. The grand finale was the globular cluster M13. In the 16" scope we were able to see an lot of individual stars in the cluster. Before we went home we watched an orange moon that was just passed full rise in the east. Another great night of astronomy!

M13 (Hercules Cluster) (Globular Cluster, in Hercules)
Observer: Vedran Vrhovac (e-mail: vedran_vrhovac@yahoo.com)
Instrument: 8-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Velika Gorica, Croatia
Light pollution: light   Transparency: fair   Seeing: good
Time: Mon Jul 25 22:30:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1268

I just bought my 8" Dob. I decided to test dob on my favorite target, M13. At 38x cluster was a bright round fuzzy, but at 80x i show countless star. At 200x only core wasn't resovled. M13 gave me superb views.

M13 (Hercules Cluster) (Globular Cluster, in Hercules, Est. RaDec 16.7 36.5)
Observer: Vedran (e-mail: vedran_vrhovac@yahoo.com)
Instrument: 76-mm other   Location: Velika Gorica, Croatia
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: good
Time: Fri May 27 22:00:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1245

When I first observed M13 it seemed incredibly dim to me. Now its a standard DS object on my observing list.Through my 76mm scope it looks like round bright nebula with granulated edge at 38x. I estimated size to 5 arc minutes.Higher magnification (56x and 117x) only dim this wonderful object.

M13 (Hercules Cluster) (Globular Cluster, in Hercules)
Observer: Emil Neata (e-mail: forvert2000@yahoo.com, web: http://www.astroclubul.org/emilneata)
Instrument: 60-mm refractor   Location: Craiova, Romania
Light pollution: light   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Tue Jan 25 00:00:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1173

Seen through a 60mm telescope, all globular clusters are small, nebulous objects. The only cluster I've managed to resolve into stars, only towards the edges, is M 13.

M13 (Hercules Cluster) (Globular Cluster, in Hercules)
Observer: Joe Caggiano (e-mail: jcaggiano@mindspring.com)
Instrument: 6-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Horsham, Pa., USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Mon Oct 4 02:00:00 2004 UT   Obs. no.: 1065

Decided to use my Celestron 15x70 Skymaster Binos due to having company over and did not have the 6" reflector cooled down. M13 was rather faint in the binos. The cluster was about the size of the full moon is to the naked eye. Very faint and could see only the core when looking around the edges of the FOV and not straight on. Last month I had viewed it with the 6" reflector. At 30x it was still faint, but then again there was almost a full moon and some evening haze in the air. I will try again this week.

M13 (Hercules Cluster) (Globular Cluster, in Hercules)
Observer: Sriram.M.Gubbi (e-mail: sriram_gubbi@yahoo.co.in)
Instrument: 50-mm refractor   Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Light pollution: light   Transparency: fair   Seeing: excellent
Time: Sat May 1 20:30:00 2004 UT   Obs. no.: 1204

this globular cluster appears a little spread out than other globulars through my scope.but by averted vision it really looks beautiful though not resolved into stars.

M13 (Hercules Cluster) (Globular Cluster, in Hercules)
Observer: Paul (e-mail: paul_ohstbucks@msn.com)
Instrument: 16-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Kansas City, MO, USA
Light pollution: light   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Sun Mar 30 08:00:00 2003 UT   Obs. no.: 796

Last night was my first observation of M13 since last fall when it was lost to the sunset. It amazed me once again in its size and brightness. At 205x, the entire cluster was clearly resolved and bright with masses of stars forming shapes and knots sprawled throughout the cluster. Taking advantage of the great seeing, I went to 310x and almost fell off my stepstool. I was peering directly into the center of the core. At 310x, the outer portions of the Halo spilled outside the FOV. I then went to 410x and was able to look through the thousands of tightly packed the central core stars and out through to the space behind. My best view of M13 to date. One of these days, I'll have to get behind some really big glass to check this cluster out.

M13 (Hercules Cluster) (Globular Cluster, in Hercules)
Observer: Paul (e-mail: paul_ohstbucks@msn.com)
Instrument: 14-inch Schmidt-Cassegrain reflector   Location: Hillsdale Lake, KS, USA
Light pollution: light   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: fair
Time: Sun Sep 1 03:00:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 707

M13 showed all its beauty tonight. The stars seemed to form patterns as they stretched out in what seemed like arms....with knots and bulges of stars sprawling out from the central core. It completely filled the field of view in the nagler.

M13 (Hercules Cluster) (Globular Cluster, in Hercules)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 20-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: none   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Sun Mar 17 04:30:00 2002 UT   Obs. no.: 622

The m 13 globular completely covered the field in the 20" dob. Numerous individual stars were seen.

M13 (Hercules Cluster) (Globular Cluster, in Hercules)
Observer: Eero Holmstrm (e-mail: holmerkki@altavista.net, web: http://angelfire.com/music/holmerkki/index.html )
Instrument: 8-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Pernajan kirkonkyl, Pernaja, Finland
Light pollution: light   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Sun Apr 9 00:20:00 2000 UT   Obs. no.: 529

A beauty. At 120x a great number of stars were resolved. Three strong branches stretched out from the center, and the cluster had a 3 - dimensional look somehow. No sign of the dark dustlanes, though.

M13 (Hercules Cluster) (Globular Cluster, in Hercules, Est. RaDec 16h41.7m, +36h28')
Observer: Dave Mitsky (e-mail: djm28@psu.edu)
Instrument: 15-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Harrisburg, PA, USA
Light pollution: light   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: good
Time: Sun Jul 11 02:15:00 1999 UT   Obs. no.: 462

Why am I bothering to log an observation of such a mundane deep-sky object you ask? Because it was the first DSO that my friend Roger Studer and I observed after driving some 750 miles so that Roger could buy a 15" f/4.5 Obsession Dob that had been listed on Astromart just two days previously. (I went along for the ride and to help Roger evaluate the telescope.) Our observing site was the "close" one that the owner used and was well over an hour to the west of Chicago. This was by far the longest I have ever traveled to observe for just one night. We also observed M17, M27, M51, M57, M82, the eastern (NGC 6992) and western (NGC 6960) sections of the Veil Nebula, Collinder 399, Albireo, V Aquilae and many others.

M13 (Hercules Cluster) (Globular Cluster, in Hercules)
Observer: Sean Wilkins (e-mail: spw7000@usa.com)
Instrument: 4.5-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Elyria, Ohio, USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: excellent
Time: Sat Jun 19 21:43:24 1999 UT   Obs. no.: 493

I was sittin around the house one day and had planned out a night to take the telescope out and do some observing. So I did.I pointed what was almost the Zenith and looked at Hercules.M13 was the first object that came to mind.It was a splendor!I also observed M57,Alberio,The Veil Nebula and M92.

M13 (Hercules Cluster) (Globular Cluster, in Hercules)
Observer: Mike Pierce (e-mail: xtozaj@webtv.net)
Instrument: 03-inch refractor   Location: Malone, Florida, USA
Light pollution: light   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Wed Jun 9 06:30:00 1999 UT   Obs. no.: 459

Got a great low power ob of M13 in Hercules. I could not resolve individual stars with my small scope, but still got some resolution of M13 as a "fuzzy." I was able to stretch my magnification to the limit of my small refractor (144x), but my Barlow (2x), just isn't worth having!

M13 (Hercules Cluster) (Globular Cluster, in Hercules)
Observer: Harold Williams (e-mail: clouseau@webtv.net)
Instrument: 10-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Sun Jul 12 03:30:00 1998 UT   Obs. no.: 365

I've often seen the Hercules Cluster from my light polluted location many times but never as good as tonight. Using the Telradhere is usually difficult because the lights of the city make it impossible tosee all but the brightest stars. Tonight,all the necessary guide stars were readilyvisible. M13 was readily found in my 40mmeyepiece at 30x. It appeared as a smallhazy patch. Going to the 20mm wide angle eyepiece at 60x, the cluster began to take some shape. Individual stars were only visible using averted vision. I then dropped in the 3x Barlow and was given a pleasant surprise. I had never used the Barlow on a dim deep sky object before so didn't know what to expect. At 180x, the cluster appeared as bright as at lower power. But, now there were many individual stars visible. My upstairs neighbor who had never looked through a telescope before came out for a look. Her first comment was, "WOW", which I understand is customary for this object.

M13 (Hercules Cluster) (Globular Cluster, in Hercules)
Observer: Joe Muse (e-mail: jmuse@bigfoot.com, web: http://www.geocities.com/capecanaveral/3185)
Instrument: 16-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Roswell, NM, USA
Light pollution: none   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Wed Oct 29 14:00:00 1997 UT   Obs. no.: 245

Great

M13 (Hercules Cluster) (Globular Cluster, in Hercules)
Observer: John Callender (e-mail: jbc@west.net, web: http://www.west.net/~jbc/)
Instrument: 8-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Carpinteria, CA, USA
Light pollution: light   Transparency: good   Seeing: fair
Time: Sun Jun 29 09:45:00 1997 UT   Obs. no.: 169

The climax of my Hercules session; I definitely saved the best for last! A big, beautiful, condensed swarm of stars at 49x, with a central glow behind it. As with M92, the central region seemed irregular at 244x, while 122x gave the prettiest view.

M13 (Hercules Cluster) (Globular Cluster, in Hercules)
Observer: James Moyer (e-mail: dr.@who.net)
Instrument: 12.5-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Buckingham, PA, USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: good
Time: Wed May 21 03:00:00 1997 UT   Obs. no.: 139

This observation was made two days before full moon. At 55x M13 appeared very bright and large with many stars resolved, esp. towards the outskirts of the cluster but also continuing towards the center. The resolved stars gave the distinct impression of being superimposed over (in front of) the unresolved globular's central region. At 205x M13 filled the field of a 7mm Nagler eyepiece with many dozens of stars resolved, tiny pinpoints of light scattered across the entire field. The resolved stars were easily seen with direct vision at both magnifications. This is my very first deep sky observation made with a new NGT-12.5 after completing collimation and star testing.

M13 (Hercules Cluster) (Globular Cluster, in Hercules)
Observer: John Callender (e-mail: jbc@west.net, web: http://www.west.net/~jbc/)
Instrument: 8-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Carpinteria, CA, USA
Light pollution: light   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Mon Mar 17 12:45:00 1997 UT   Obs. no.: 113

My first viewing of M13 with this telescope. At 49x gave the appearance of a big, circular star cluster with an unresolved, condensed glow centered behind it. Best view was at 122x, with some of the central glow being resolved into faint stars.

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