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Observations made in the constellation Libra:

Sun (Sun, est. to be in Libra)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 62-inch other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Wed Oct 18 16:30:00 2017 UT   Obs. no.: 2033

Today, I viewed the sun with my Sunspotter Solar Telescope. Once again the sun has no sunspots on it. It's been blank for several days now.

Sun (Sun, est. to be in Libra)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 62-mm other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Wed Sep 27 15:45:00 2017 UT   Obs. no.: 2029

This morning I observed the Sun with my Sunspotter Solar Telescope. The sun now has 3 impressive Sunspot groups. Sunspot AR2681 is getting ready to move off while sunspot groups AR2682 & AR2683 are now on the sun's face. It looks to me like these sunspots may become active & possibly send a CME our way. Let's wait & see.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.5, est. to be in Libra)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 50-mm binoculars   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Mon Apr 3 02:15:00 2017 UT   Obs. no.: 2002

This evening I observed Jupiter with a 7th magnitude star about a quarter of a degree above the planet. I also was able to see two moons near Jupiter as well a Spica below Jupiter. It was a nice little gathering.

Saturn (Planet, est. mag 0.0, est. to be in Libra)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 12-inch refractor   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Sun May 17 01:00:00 2015 UT   Obs. no.: 1949

Last evening, My friends Mike Recchia, Steve Borer & I took a trip to Leitner Observatory at Yale to see a planetarium show & then afterwards to do some observing with Yale's Telescopes. The first planet we viewed was Saturn which the observatory's 12" refractor was trained on. The rings were in great view & Saturn's moon Titan was easily seen. With two smaller scopes, we were able to observe Jupiter & its four moons. The belts of Jupiter were easily seen. Finally we observed Venus which is now a waning crescent. I did some dark areas on Venus' cloud deck. All in all it was a great evening of astronomy.

Saturn (Planet, est. mag -.4, est. to be in Libra)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Tue Jul 8 01:00:00 2014 UT   Obs. no.: 1925

Last evening, my friend Joe & I viewed the close conjunction of Saturn & the moon. Saturn was about 0.6 degrees above the moon. A very nice sight.

Saturn (Planet, est. mag 0.0, est. to be in Libra)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Sun Jun 22 02:00:00 2014 UT   Obs. no.: 1921

Last night, my friend Steve & I viewed a number of objects with Steve's 6" Dob & my 12MM Televue eyepiece. We first turned our attention to Saturn, where we were able to see a belt going across the northern hemisphere. We were also able to see the Cassini Division in Saturn's rings. We then observed Mars & much to our surprise, we were still able to see some albedo markings & Mars' polar icecap. After viewing some double stars & seeing a -4 magnitude iridium flair, we turned our attention to a first time object for us to view. The star HD162826 is now considered to be our sun's sister star meaning it was born in the same nebula as our sun, 4.5 billion years ago. This star is about 6th or 7th magnitude & is easy to find one binocular field above & right of Vega. It looked yellow in my binoculars too. One more sky first we saw was Chinese lanterns, which look like UFO's floating across the sky. It was a great evening of viewing.

Saturn (Planet, est. mag 0.00, est. to be in Libra)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 50-mm binoculars   Location: Port Charlotte , Florida, United States
Light pollution: light   Transparency: fair   Seeing: good
Time: Fri May 23 02:00:00 2014 UT   Obs. no.: 1913

While vacationing in Florida, my friend Steve & I viewed Saturn with my 10X50 binoculars. With Saturn's rings very wide now, the planet looked like a tiny flying saucer. We also noted how Jupiter, Mars & Saturn were strung out along the ecliptic covering the whole sky. Scorpio was a great sight high in the southern sky with M7 visible with the naked eye. The next evening our entire group went on a sunset cruise. The sun looked completely distorted just before sunset. I promised everyone we would see the green flash but alas, I was wrong. Still, it was great watching the sunset.

Satellite (Satellite, est. mag -5, est. to be in Libra)
Observer: Mark D. Schneider (e-mail: markd_s@yahoo.com)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: Garden Grove, California, United States of America
Light pollution: light   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Tue Feb 24 12:59:00 2009 UT   Obs. no.: 1815

Iridium 65 FLARE opportunity toward the South this Morning before Sunrise.Right Ascension: 15h 24m 45.095s Appearent coordinates Declination: - 11 12' 49.79" Appearent coordinatesSun: Altitude: -18.7Time: 2009 February 24 Tuesday, 4h 58m 19s JD: 2454887.0404978 TDT: 2454887.0412597 deltaT: 65.82 sec Apparent sidereal time: Local: 15h 24m 45.095s Greenwich: 23h 16m 28.074s (All times in PST, UTC-08:00, topocentric data for Home, United States)Also got it using my Canon Digital PowerShot Camera.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.4, est. to be in Libra)
Observer: Joe Caggiano (e-mail: jcaggiano@mindspring.com, web: http://home.mindspring.com/~jcaggiano/)
Instrument: 6-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Glenside, Pa, USA
Light pollution: light   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Thu Jun 1 02:30:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1536

First time in over a month to really view Jupiter with some clarity. Using binoviewers, a 2x barlow and a planetary color booster, 4 bands easily appeared as well as both polar zones. Using a Jupiter Satellite program, I was able to tell that the GRS was not visible during my observation. What appeared as a smaller version of the Great Red Spot may possibly have been a festoon. Jupiter currently is still over 42" but will continue to shrink as it is passed its opposition early this month. I have posted some pics on my website.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.5, est. to be in Libra)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 127-mm other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Sun May 28 02:10:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1533

This evening, I observed Jupiter with my 127mm MAK. Using my new Orthoscopic eyepiece with an orange filter, I was able to enjoy a nice view of the Great Red Spot. The GRS now has an orange tinge to it. Just a reminder, an orange filter will not affect the color of the GRS. The orange color seems to be deepenimg to me. I also think the North Temperate belt may be reappearing. I was able to see a small section of it. The north Equitorial Belt had some obvious festooning in it. Also, Europa's shadow was transiting Jupiter but alas, I could not see it.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.5, est. to be in Libra)
Observer: Joe Caggiano (e-mail: jcaggiano@mindspring.com, web: http://home.mindspring.com/~jcaggiano/)
Instrument: 6-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Glenside, Pa, USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: poor
Time: Sun Apr 30 03:45:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1529

I got my first oppurtunity to view (and capture) a transition of Io in front of Jupiter. Starting at 10:45 on Saturday night, I noticed a small black dot that appeared on Jupiter at 250x. Seeing was not very good as there was turbulence in the atmosphere. Using a Jupiter Satellite program I have installed on my pc, it showed that Io had just stared a transit across Jupiter. I watched until alittle after 1:15 that morning, capturing shots along the way. Io itself could not be spotted as it blended in on the face of Jupiter. I could only see the small pinpoint shadow left by Io. It was my first transition of a Jovian moon. I have posted pics on my website. Hopefully the atmosphere will clear up as May 4 is Jupiter's opposition. It will span 44.7 arc-seconds.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.3, est. to be in Libra)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 127-mm other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Thu Apr 27 03:30:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1528

This evening, I observed Jupiter with my 127mm MAK. I saw festoons on the north equitorial belt with some white ovals embedded in them. The south temperate belt is now easily seen as Jupiter gets closer to opposition. There are now two faint stars near Jupiter. This makes it look like Jupiter has six Galalean moons. It's a very interesting sight.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.5, est. to be in Libra)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 127-mm other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Fri Mar 31 06:00:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1517

Early this morning, I observed Jupiter with my 127mm MAK. Using an orange filter, I was able to observe Jupiter's newest storm, the little red spot. The little red spot seems to be about half the size of the great red spot with a burnt orange tinge to it. Also, the LRS seems to be just off the south equitorial belt. This contrasts with the GRS which sits on the SEB. I also think I saw the south temperate belt. Earlier in the evening, I joined my friends Mike Dzubaty and Steve Borer to observe Saturn and Mars with Steve's 17" dob. I was able to see several different moons of Saturn. The rings also showed up nicely. We also tried to see if Mars' north polar icecap was showing yet. No matter how hard we tried, we could not see any icecaps or subtle markings on Mars. Mars did show an obvious gibbous phase.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.4, est. to be in Libra)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 127-mm other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: poor
Time: Tue Mar 21 05:40:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1512

Early this morning, I observed Jupiter with my 127mm MAK. Using an orange filter, I was able to observe the great red spot. Thr GRS has now become much redder looking compared to my observations last year using an orange filter. To confirm that the GRS is redder, I took a look at my friend Joe Caggione's most recent image of Jupiter's GRS. His image also shows the GRS looking redder. I also wanted to observe the newly discovered Little Red Spot but I was not able to pick it out.

Jupiter (Planet, est. mag -2.4, est. to be in Libra)
Observer: Joe Caggiano (e-mail: jcaggiano@mindspring.com, web: http://home.mindspring.com/~jcaggiano/)
Instrument: 70-mm binoculars   Location: Glenside, Pa, USA
Light pollution: light   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Sun Mar 19 06:00:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1511

Viewed Jupiter throughout the weekend. On Friday night into Saturday morning the clouds were pretty thick. Unlike Saturn, these actually helped me to attain a few nice pictures of the planet. The clouds acted as a natural glare filter against the brightness of the planet. Because of this, the disk was not white-washed and some detail was picked up without messing with a combination of different filters. Saturday night into Sunday morning was just the opposite. There were no clouds and extra filters were needed to draw out surface detail. I finally got a chance to "confirm" seeing the Great Red Spot. The planet is massive, currently measuring 42' across. Viewing was only so-so both days. Jupiter will continue to get larger as we head into it's opposition with the Earth. I have posted some pictures from both nights on my website.

Comet (Comet, est. mag ~7th, est. to be in Libra)
Observer: Dave Mitsky (e-mail: djm28@psu.edu)
Instrument: 17-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Harrisburg, PA, USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Wed Jan 3 09:00:00 2001 UT   Obs. no.: 543

I got my first look at C/1999 T1 (McNaught-Hartley) on the night of the Quadrantid meteor shower using the ASH 17" f/15 classical Cassegrain. A moderately bright coma was obvious but I failed to see the short tail that had been reported. A faint stellar pseudonucleus may have been present. We also observed Comet McNaught-Hartley through the ASH 12.5" f/6.5 Cave Newtonian and Howard Hoch's 80mm f/5 refractor. Before hunting for the comet I gave still tiny Mars a quick peak. The Quadrantids were disappointing. (Perhaps those farther west got tosee the expected peak activity.) I counted only six in 45 minutes ofdedicated meteor watching beginning at 10:15 UT. One that streakedbelow Bootes was fairly bright, perhaps -1, but quite short-lived.Hardly worth the hardships involved despite many layers of warmclothing, a sleeping bag,and a blanket.Before closing the French Dome I swung the 17" to a still visible M57 at11:30 UT.Objects observed on 2000/1/3: 152mm f/9 refractor - M42, M43, A theta 1 Orionis(V1016) and the Trapezium, the moon, Saturn, Jupiter, Sirius, M93, NovaPuppis; 17" f/15 classical Cassegrain - A theta 1 Orionis (118x), M93 (118x), Nova Puppis (118x), Mars (118x), C/1999 T1 (McNaught-Hartley)(118, 202x), M57 (118x); 12.5" f/6.5 Newtonian - C/1999 T1 (McNaught-Hartley); 125mm f/5 finder scope refractor - C/1999 T1(McNaught-Hartley); 80mm f/5 refractor - C/1999 T1 (McNaught-Hartley); naked-eye - 6 Quadrantid meteors

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