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Observations made in the constellation Cygnus:

M29 (Open Cluster, in Cygnus)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 127-mm other   Location: West Haven, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: severe   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Thu Aug 31 01:15:00 2017 UT   Obs. no.: 2025

This evening, my brother Anthony & I viewed a few objects with my 127mm MAK. The highlight of the evening was our observation of the open cluster M29. We were able to see many stars in the cluster. We also viewed the galaxy M31 but all we could see was the core of the galaxy. We also viewed Saturn & with its rings wide open, it was a great sight. Saturn also had a close pairing with the moon.

Satellite (Satellite, est. mag -7, est. to be in Cygnus)
Observer: Mark D. Schneider (e-mail: markd_s@yahoo.com)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: Garden Grove, California, United States of America
Light pollution: light   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Fri Jul 29 04:54:30 2016 UT   Obs. no.: 1978

BRIGHT Iridium 35 flare below the Summer Triangle.

Satellite (Satellite, est. mag -8, est. to be in Cygnus)
Observer: Mark D. Schneider (e-mail: markd_s@yahoo.com)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: Garden Grove, California, United States of America
Light pollution: light   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Fri Jul 11 05:04:13 2014 UT   Obs. no.: 1926

Iridium 83 flare...very bright.

Satellite (Satellite, est. mag -6, est. to be in Cygnus)
Observer: Mark D. Schneider (e-mail: markd_s@yahoo.com)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: Garden Grove, California, United States of America
Light pollution: light   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Fri Jun 20 04:56:46 2014 UT   Obs. no.: 1920

ISS pass before it passed into the Umbra.

Satellite (Satellite, est. mag -4, est. to be in Cygnus)
Observer: Mark D. Schneider (e-mail: markd_s@yahoo.com)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: Garden Grove, California, United States of America
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Thu Jun 12 05:28:24 2014 UT   Obs. no.: 1917

Iridium 5 flare low in the East-Northeast.

Satellite (Satellite, est. mag -6, est. to be in Cygnus)
Observer: Mark D. Schneider (e-mail: markd_s@yahoo.com)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: Garden Grove, California, United States of America
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: good
Time: Fri Jun 1 05:35:00 2007 UT   Obs. no.: 1662

Iridium 19 in the NE sky.

M29 (Open Cluster, in Cygnus)
Observer: Joe Caggiano (e-mail: jcaggiano@mindspring.com, web: http://home.mindspring.com/~jcaggiano/)
Instrument: 70-mm binoculars   Location: Glenside, Pa, USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Wed Sep 13 02:00:00 2006 UT   Obs. no.: 1563

Cygnus was directly overhead while viewing. It was a cool night in the upper 40's and the atmosphere was still. I took in the vast star fields of the Milky Way that run right through Cygnus. Viewed stars through the binos probably down to 9th magnitude. A Beuatiful sight!

M29 (Open Cluster, in Cygnus)
Observer: Francisco Violat Bordonau (e-mail: fviolat@yahoo.es)
Instrument: 8-inch Schmidt-Cassegrain reflector   Location: Cceres, Cceres (Spain)
Light pollution: none   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Mon Nov 14 22:05:12 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1404

With a CCD and a filter V Johnson I can capture all this variable stars.

NGC7000 (Bright Nebula, in Cygnus)
Observer: Joe Caggiano (e-mail: jcaggiano@mindspring.com)
Instrument: 70-mm binoculars   Location: Glenside, Pa, USA
Light pollution: light   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: good
Time: Mon Nov 7 00:45:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1395

Spotted the North American nebula just a few degrees off from Deneb. Using a nebula filter and my 15x70 Skymaster binos, I spotted the formation of stars that form what appears to be a sidewards "A" in the stars. It was so large and diffuse that I passed it numerous times before in my scope at 30x. In the binos it took up a great portion of my FOV. No wonder I could not spot it before! It appeared about as large as M42 appears at about 100x. VERY faint, at low power I can just make out the continental shape as well as the rift between it and the pelican nebula just next to it.

NGC6960 (Bright Nebula, in Cygnus)
Observer: Emil Neata (e-mail: forvert2000@yahoo.com, web: http://www.nightskyinfo.com)
Instrument: 6-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: No location given
Light pollution: light   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Mon Oct 10 23:00:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1361

You can find NGC 6960 (Lace - Work Nebula, part of Veil Nebula) around the fourth magnitude star 52 Cygni.The nebula is very difficult in less than perfect skies, but visible with a 114-mm telescope from a dark location. Use averted vision, and keep 52 Cygni just out of the field.A UHC or OIII filter can really improve the visibility of the nebula, it allows much more contrast and detail to be seen, even if you observe from a slightly light polluted location.

NGC6979 (Bright Nebula, in Cygnus)
Observer: Michael Amato (e-mail: abigmick@aol.com)
Instrument: 25-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Colchester, Connecticut, United States
Light pollution: light   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Sun Oct 2 02:00:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1347

I just returned from the Connecticut Star Party. The largest scope there was the 25" dobsonian brought to the star party by members of the Westport astro group. One object I had the pleasure of observing, was the Veil Nebula. By moving the scope we were able to trace almost the entire length of the nebula. The best way to describe it was it looked like a long pale yellow veil, brighter in some spots and dimmer in other spots. For the first time in my life, I was able to also observe a planetary nebula called the blue snowball. The blue color was striking and it looked just like a snowball. In an 18" dob, I was able to observe M31 at high power. There was a dust lane cutting through one side of the of the galaxy that was very obvious. In a 6" refractor, I was able to observe Mars. The shrinking south polar cap was easily seen as was the blue colored north polar hood. I was not able to identify the dark areas of Mars that were visible. The 6" scope was then moved to Neptune. At high power, Neptune had a very bright blue disk. I had to go to an SCG 8" scope to observe Uranus. Its disk was pale blue with just a tinge of light green in it.I also had a stunning view of the double cluster with a mounted 25X100 binocular. Believe me when I say this is the best way to look at the double cluster. During the day, we observed the sun with white light, hydrogen alfa & continum filters. In hydrogen alfa, there was a prominence that we estimated was the size of four earths. There were also smaller prominences also. The sun showed no sunspots in white light. All in all, it was a great weekend.

Meteor (Meteor, est. mag -2, est. to be in Cygnus, Est. RaDec 60)
Observer: Joe Caggiano (e-mail: jcaggiano@mindspring.com)
Instrument: naked eye   Location: Horsham, Pa, USA
Light pollution: light   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Fri Sep 2 02:17:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1299

Was outside last night admiring the first clear night in some time when a blue-white meteor flashed past. It was originating from the Cygnus region and heading Southwest. It was maybe visible for 15 degrees as it streaked approx mag -2.0. About a minute later, another meteor slightly less bright (mag -1.8 or so) but with the same coloring flared past heading due West. Also originating from the Cygnus region this one was visible for maybe 20 degrees or so.

NGC7027 (Planetary Nebula, in Cygnus)
Observer: Andrew Cooper (e-mail: acooper@pobox.com, web: http://www.siowl.com/)
Instrument: 46-cm Dobsonian reflector   Location: TIMPA, near Tucson, Arizona, United States
Light pollution: light   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Sun Aug 28 06:22:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1293

Small, bright, vivid green!! one fellow observer commented on emerald, I would call it a rich teal, central star to one side of a small fan shaped nebula

M39 (Open Cluster, in Cygnus)
Observer: Akarsh Simha (e-mail: akarsh_simha@fastmail.fm)
Instrument: 8-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Sat Aug 6 22:00:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1309

Beautiful, Bright, fairly dense open cluster. Easy to locate once you know the neighbouring stars. About 80x does well.

NGC6960 (Bright Nebula, in Cygnus)
Observer: Andrew Cooper (e-mail: acooper@pobox.com, web: http://www.siowl.com/)
Instrument: 46-cm Dobsonian reflector   Location: Vekol Road, Arizona, Unites States
Light pollution: none   Transparency: good   Seeing: fair
Time: Sun Jun 5 04:00:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1274

The fragment surrounding 52Cyg , appears as a wisp of smoke, starting narrow to the north and widening as it goes through the star, a lot of detail within the wisp, almost appearing braided, OIII allows much more contrast and detail to be seen

M29 (Open Cluster, in Cygnus)
Observer: Akarsh Simha (e-mail: akarsh_simha@fastmail.fm)
Instrument: 8-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Bangalore, Karnataka, India
Light pollution: light   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Sat Mar 19 22:00:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1331

A unappreciable cluster of about 6 bright stars. Stars are about 5.5 mag.

NGC7082 (Open Cluster, in Cygnus)
Observer: Emil Neata (e-mail: forvert2000@yahoo.com, web: http://www.astroclubul.org/emilneata)
Instrument: 60-mm refractor   Location: Craiova, Romania
Light pollution: light   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Tue Jan 25 00:00:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1161

NGC 7082 - Composed of 30 faint stars.

M39 (Open Cluster, in Cygnus)
Observer: Emil Neata (e-mail: forvert2000@yahoo.com, web: http://www.astroclubul.org/emilneata)
Instrument: 60-mm refractor   Location: Craiova, Romania
Light pollution: light   Transparency: fair   Seeing: fair
Time: Tue Jan 25 00:00:00 2005 UT   Obs. no.: 1160

M 39 - Large and very scattered. Composed of approximately 40 stars, of which 10 brighter ones.

M29 (Open Cluster, in Cygnus)
Observer: Emil Neata (e-mail: forvert2000@yahoo.com, web: http://www.geocities.com/deep_sky_astronomy)
Instrument: 114-mm Dobsonian reflector   Location: Craiova, Romania
Light pollution: light   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Wed Nov 10 03:00:00 2004 UT   Obs. no.: 1109

M 29 is a beautiful cluster in Cygnus, placed in a star rich area of the Milky Way. Using 36x I could see eight stars easily discernible from the background. In the finder scope it appears as a small diffuse patch.

M29 (Open Cluster, in Cygnus)
Observer: Joe Caggiano (e-mail: jcaggiano@mindspring.com)
Instrument: 6-inch equatorial reflector   Location: Horsham, Pa., USA
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: excellent
Time: Mon Oct 4 02:00:00 2004 UT   Obs. no.: 1064

Decided to use my Celestron 15x70 Skymaster Binos due to having company over and did not have the 6" reflector cooled down. M29 was conspicuous in Cygnus but I always am drawn to the populated star field rather than M29 itself. It was however readily available for easy gazing in the 70mm binos. I tried for M57 but missed it. It was right at the zenith point at the time of me going to bed. This morning at 0600 EST when I awoke, Venus and M42 were out but I did not have a chance before getting ready for work. Perhaps tomorrow.

NGC7000 (Bright Nebula, in Cygnus)
Observer: Giorgos Koronis (e-mail: giorgos.koronis@lies.com)
Instrument: 8-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Parnon mountain, Greece
Light pollution: none   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: good
Time: Sun Jun 20 00:55:00 2004 UT   Obs. no.: 1024

The famous north America nebula is faint.Under the fine dark skies of Parnon mountain I could easily follow the "mexican coast" up to the "gulf of mexico" with direct vision.No filter used.28 x(32mm erfle).

NGC7013 (Galaxy, in Cygnus)
Observer: Giorgos Koronis (e-mail: giorgos.koronis@lies.com)
Instrument: 8-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Parnon mountain, Greece
Light pollution: none   Transparency: excellent   Seeing: good
Time: Sat Jun 19 19:35:00 2004 UT   Obs. no.: 1019

Galaxy near the veil nebula.Faint,in a rich field.Next to a star.Eyepiece 20mm plossl (45x).

Delta Cyg (Multiple Star, in Cygnus)
Observer: Giorgos Koronis (e-mail: giorgos.koronis@lies.com)
Instrument: 8-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Kalamata, Greece
Light pollution: light   Transparency: good   Seeing: excellent
Time: Sun May 23 23:40:00 2004 UT   Obs. no.: 1004

The air was steady.Using a 6.3 mm plossl (144x)the secondary was steadily visible between the difraction spikes.Nice binary and nice test for the steadiness of the air.

Comet (Comet, est. mag 8.5, est. to be in Cygnus)
Observer: Giorgos Koronis (e-mail: giorgos.koronis@lies.com)
Instrument: 8-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Kalamata, Greece
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: excellent
Time: Sun May 23 23:06:00 2004 UT   Obs. no.: 1007

Observed C/2004 K4 (Linear) with 8.8mm UWA eyepiece(104x).Brighter since my last observation.Estimated magnitude 8.5.With averted vision I suspected a starlike nucleus.No tail visible.

Comet (Comet, est. mag 9, est. to be in Cygnus)
Observer: Giorgos Koronis (e-mail: giorgos.koronis@lies.com)
Instrument: 8-inch Dobsonian reflector   Location: Kalamata, Greece
Light pollution: moderate   Transparency: good   Seeing: good
Time: Thu May 20 00:10:00 2004 UT   Obs. no.: 1001

Slowly sweeping near the star 15 Cygni I spotted again comet C/2003 K4 (Linear).I used a 10 mm plossl eyepiece (91x) on my 8" f/4.5 dob.It seemed brighter than during my previous observation.It was small,no tail visible,in a nice rich milkyway field.

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